A Personal Narrative of a Visit to Ghuzni, Kabul, and Afghanistan, and of a Residence at the Court of Dost Mohamed: With Notices of Runjit Sing, Khiva, and the Russian Expedition (E-bok fra Google)

Forside
Whittaker, 1840 - 479 sider
0 Anmeldelser
  

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Innhold

I
1
II
35
III
67
IV
98
V
125
VI
154
VII
179
VIII
202
IX
227
X
267
XI
325
XII
384

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 470 - ... if he should consent to such a measure his name would be handed down to posterity as
Side 469 - Somnath, a stone idol, five yards in height, two of which were sunk in the ground. The king, approaching the image, raised his mace and struck off its nose. He ordered two pieces of the idol to be broken off, and sent to Ghuzni, that one might be thrown at the threshold of the public mosque, and the other at the court door of his own palace. These identical fragments are to this day, (now six hundred years ago,) to be seen at Ghuzni.
Side 61 - H -II estimate the height of the ridge to be about nine thousand feet more. Dark and finely pencilled lines were visible for about twothirds of the height of the ridge. These, when seen through a glass, proved to be rows of fir-trees, waving as they projected or receded, with the ravines and banks on its side; a few only were growing on the sheltering crevices upon the summit, which, in the distance, appeared to be of a bare, light-coloured, grey rock. I was told, that on the top, there was a holy...
Side 459 - Russia has a right, and which alone can ensure the maintenance of peace. This is the purpose of the present expedition; and as soon as it shall be attained, and an order of things conformable to the interests of Russia and the neighbouring Asiatic states shall be established on a permanent footing, the body of troops nh that has received orders to march on Khiva, will return to the frontiers of the empire.
Side 185 - Bud" dhists of Tibet for two years previously, is " unexceptionable evidence. He says, vol. " ii. p. 391, ' my own conviction, from the " ' character of the buildings, of the caves, " ' paintings, and sculptures, is, that Bamian, " ' whatever its ancient appellation, was the " ' residence of a great Lama, bearing the " ' same relation to the Lamaism of the " ' West, as Lhassa does now to that of the " ' East.' " There is an apparent exception to the " general character of Buddhism in some of " the...
Side 469 - Brahmins petitioned his attendants, and offered a quantity of gold if the king would desist from further mutilation. His officers endeavoured to persuade him to accept of the money ; for they said that breaking one idol would not do away with idolatry altogether; that, therefore, it could serve no purpose to destroy the image entirely; but that such a sum of money given in charity among true believers, would be a meritorious act. The king acknowledged there might be reason in what they said, but...
Side 469 - Somnat, a stone idol, five yards in height, two of which were sunk in the ground. The King, approaching the image, raised his mace and struck off its nose. He ordered two pieces of the idol to be broken off and sent to Ghizny, that one might be thrown at the threshold of the public mosque, and the other at the court door of his own palace. These identical fragments are to this day (now 600 years ago) to be seen at Ghizny. Two more fragments were reserved to be sent to Mecca and Medina.
Side 467 - Rajah and inhabitants had abandoned the place, rather than submit to him, Mahmud ordered it to be sacked, and the adjacent country to be laid waste. Conceiving the reduction of the fort of Ajmeer would occupy too much time, he left it unmolested ; and proceeding on his expedition, took by assault some smaller forts on the road, till at length he arrived at Nehrwala, a frontier city of Guzerat, which was evacuated on his approach.
Side 224 - Nawah's castle of Bukhak. About half-way we passed an old bridge over the Logur river, which forms a junction with the Kabul river near Bukhak ; and thence, under the name of the Kabul river, passes through the defile by which it enters Lughman. There, so I was informed, its waters are precipitated over a ledge of rocks so as to form a cataract, which alone would effectually prevent a water-communication between Kabul and the Attok. The road from Kabul to Bunu Tak is open, and not difficult, according...
Side 22 - Loham's, chiefly from Bokhara and Turkistan : these are manufactured in one hundred and fifty workshops. One man will finish an ordinary kaish or piece of silk in six days, perhaps three yards long and a foot and a half wide, taking eight days previously for the arrangement of the weaving apparatus. A very handsome kaish is finished in sixteen days.

Bibliografisk informasjon