Notes on the Bedouins and Wahábys: Collected During His Travels in the East, Volum 2 (E-bok fra Google)

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H. Colburn and R. Bentley, 1831
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Side 364 - Each of these is divided into different parts : — Islam has five, viz. the profession that there is no God but God, and that Mohammed is his prophet...
Side 366 - Righteousness is not that ye turn your faces towards the east or the west, but righteousness is, one who believes in God, and the last day, and...
Side 90 - Egypt, where they are particularly injurious to the palm-trees. These they strip of every leaf and green particle, the trees remaining like skeletons with bare branches. In Arabia the locusts are known to come invariably from the East, and the Arabs accordingly say that they are produced by the waters of the Persian Gulf. The province of Nedjd is...
Side 70 - ... dreaded in various quarters of the desert), than any others; and on that account principally they are preferred by the Bedouins, who from the most distant parts of Arabia repair to Nedjd that they may renew their flocks. Among the Bedouins, female camels are always more esteemed and dearer than the males. In Syria and Egypt, on the contrary, where the camels are chiefly wanted for their strength in bearing heavy loads, the males are most valued. The' people who inhabit the towns and villages...
Side 125 - Mohammed, and explained the text according to the commentaries of the best writers. After him, other olemas delivered lectures in the same manner, and Saoud himself always closed the meeting by taking the book and explaining every difficult passage. It is said that he equalled, or perhaps excelled, any of the olemas in his knowledge of religious controversy and of the law in general. His eloquence was universally admired ; his voice remarkably sonorous and sweet at the same time, which made the Arabs...
Side 52 - Hadramaut, comprising the great chain of mountains and the lower grounds on the west of it, towards the sea. The great heat of the climate in Oman is reckoned unfavourable to the breeding of horses, which are there still more scarce than in Yemen. When I affirm, therefore, that the aggregate number of horses in Arabia, (as bounded by the river Euphrates and by Syria,) does not exceed fifty thousand, (a number much inferior to what the same extent of ground in any other part of Asia or in Europe would...
Side 50 - Arabia is very rich in horses; but the breed is limited to the extent of fertile pasture grounds in that country, and it is in such parts only that horses thrive, while those Bedouins who occupy districts of poor soil rarely possess any horses. It is found, accordingly, that the tribes most rich in horses are those who dwell in the comparatively fertile plains of Mesopotamia, on the banks of the river Euphrates, and in the Syrian plains. Horses can there feed for several of the spring months upon...
Side 195 - Saoud declared that he might have taken the town by assault long before, but that he wished to avoid disorder and excesses ; and he told the olemas in full council that he had seen Mohammed in a dream, who threatened him that he should not survive three days if a single grain of corn were forcibly taken from the holy city. The people of Mekka now became Wahabys ; that is, they were obliged to pray more punctually than usual, to lay aside and conceal their fine silk dresses, and to desist from smoking...
Side 53 - I have arrived at about the true estimate. •' In this part of the east I know not any country that seems to abound more in horses than Mesopotamia. The tribes of Curdes and Bedouins in that quarter probably possess greater numbers than all the Arabian Bedouins together, for the richness of the Mesopotamian pasture contributes materially to augment the breed. The best pasturing places of Arabia not only produce the greatest number of horses, but likewise the finest and most select race. The best...
Side 91 - East) toward the end of May, when the Pleiades are setting, according to observations made by the Arabs, who believe that the locusts entertain a considerable dread of that constellation. They remain there generally during a space of forty or fifty days, and then disappear for the rest of the year.

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