Voyages to the East-Indies, Volum 1 (E-bok fra Google)

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G.G. and J. Robinson, 1798
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Side 463 - Another boat of this country which is very curiously constructed is called a Mourpunkey ; these are very long and narrow and sometimes extending to upwards of an hundred feet in length, and not more than eight feet in breadth...
Side 223 - Monlbons are fet in, they can difcern an high mountainous Land to the Southward of them, and continues in Sight from December to the latter End of February, or the Beginning of 'March, and then difappears. If the Report be true, it muft be fome...
Side 313 - Portuguese ; but these never become entirely white. Children born in the Indies are nicknamed liplaps by the Europeans, although both parents may have come from Europe. Girls are commonly marriageable at twelve or thirteen years of age, and sometimes younger. It seldom happens, if they are but tolerably...
Side 408 - A chaffingdifh, or pan of embers, is then given to him, with a model of what is to be made ; and the gold or filver is weighed off to him by rupees ; a.nd an agreement is made how many annas, or fixteenth parts of a rupee, according to the work that is to be done, and the trouble required to...
Side 300 - It does not unfrequently happen, that two ladies, of equal rank, meeting each other, in their carriages, one will not give way to the other, though they may be forced to remain for hours in the street.
Side 287 - ... post stuck in the ground. At the top of the post, about ten feet from the ground, there was a kind of little bench, upon which the body rested. " The insensibility or fortitude of the miserable sufferer was incredible. He did not utter the least complaint, except when the spike...
Side 289 - These acts of indiscriminate murder are called mucks, because the perpetrators of them, during their frenzy, continually cry out amok, amok, which signifies kill, kill. When, by swallowing much opium, or by other means, they are raised to a pitch of desperate fury, they sally out with a knife or other weapon in their hand, and kill, without distinction of sex, rank, or age, whoever they meet in the streets of Batavia ; and proceed in this way...
Side 226 - ... particularly for the last thirty years, in which period the cultivation of coffee and other articles has been assiduously prosecuted and encouraged. The chief produce is pepper, which is mostly grown in the western part of the island. This spice is produced from a plant of the vine kind, piper nigrum, which twines its tendrils round poles or trees, like ivy or hops. The peppercorns grow in bunches close to each other.
Side 310 - Dutch or of any other cation, and in whatever station they are, live at Batavia nearly in the same manner. In the morning, at five o'clock, or earlier, when the day breaks, they get up. Many of them then sit at their doors; others stay in the house, with nothing but a light gown, in which they sleep, thrown over their naked limbs; they breakfast upon coffee or tea ; afterwards dress, and go about whatever business they may have. Almost all who have any place or employment must be at their proper...
Side 409 - The whole is done with a very trifling apparatus and Europeans are surprised to behold the perfection of manufacture, which is exemplified here in almost every handicraft, effected with so few and such imperfect...

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