The Universal Magazine, Volumer 52-53 (E-bok fra Google)

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Pub. for J. Hinton, 1773
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Side 253 - Ask where's the North? at York, 'tis on the Tweed; In Scotland, at the Orcades; and there, At Greenland, Zembla, or the Lord knows where.
Side 64 - There are few great personages in history who have been more exposed to the calumny of enemies, and the adulation of friends, than queen Elizabeth ; and yet there is scarcely any whose reputation has been more certainly determined by the unanimous consent of posterity. The unusual length of her administration, and the strong features of her character, were able to overcome all prejudices ; and obliging her detractors...
Side 24 - ... to be in company ; the one has but part of the affairs of one nation, the other all the works of God and nature under his consideration. There is no saying shocks me so much as that which I hear very often, " that a man does not know how to pass his time.
Side 257 - That all acquisitions made under the influence of a military force, or by treaty with foreign princes, do of right belong to the State.
Side 112 - Almighty Lord, who is a most strong tower to all them that put their trust in him, to whom all things in heaven, in earth, and under the earth, do bow and obey, be now and evermore thy defence; and make...
Side 40 - The righted orphan's grateful tear. To Virtue and her friends a friend, Still may my voice the weak defend, Ne'er may my prostituted tongue Protect th' oppressor in his wrong, Nor wrest the spirit of the laws To sanctify a villain's cause.
Side 112 - Albeit that good works, which are the fruits of faith, and follow after justification, cannot put away our sins, and endure the severity of God's judgment ; yet are they pleasing and acceptable to God in Christ, and do spring out necessarily of a true and lively faith ; insomuch that by them a lively faith may be as evidently known as a tree discerned by the fruit.
Side 304 - Whereas nothing can redound more to the honour of this nation as a maritime power, to the dignity of the crown of Great Britain, and to the advancement of the trade and navigation thereof, than to make discoveries of countries hitherto unknown...
Side 80 - Fault, it is very fit they fhould have what they deferve, but I hope no Perfuafion will prevail with the Prince himfelf to lay down that Commiffion. The Navy I think is fafer in his Hands, .than in any other Man's...
Side 214 - Gentlemen of the House of Commons, " I have ordered the proper officers to lay before you the national accounts, and...

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