Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, ed. by W. Smith (E-bok fra Google)

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1861
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Side 254 - The Lord possessed me in the beginning of his way, before his works of old. 23 I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was. 24 When there were no depths, I was brought forth ; when there were no fountains abounding with water. 25 Before the mountains were settled, before the hills was I brought forth...
Side 217 - His practice is based on the two fundamental maxims : 1. That disease is something contrary to nature, and is to be overcome by that which is contrary to the disease itself; and 2.
Side 54 - Epistle in defence of the procession of the Holy Spirit from the Father and the Son...
Side 37 - His gods, like every thing else, consisted of atoms, and our notions of them are based upon the ttSot\a which are reflected from them and pass into our minds. They were and always had been in the enjoyment of perfect happiness, which had not been disturbed by the laborious business of creating the world ; and as the government of the world would interfere with their happiness, he conceived them as exercising no influence whatever upon the world or man.
Side 203 - Omne jus quo utimur, vel ad personas pertinet, vel ad res, vel ad actiones.
Side 107 - He could not bring his philosophical convictions with regard to the nature of God and His relation to mankind into harmony with the contents of these legends, nor could he pass over in silence their incongruities. Hence it is that he is driven to the strange necessity of carrying on a sort of polemical discussion with the very materials and subjects of whiten he had to treat.
Side 65 - The length of this article will not be blamed by any one who considers that, the sacred writers excepted, no Greek has been so much read or so variously translated as Euclid.
Side 406 - Since the days of Scipio and Hannibal, no bolder enterprise has been attempted than that which Heraclius achieved for the deliverance of the empire.
Side 69 - This book has a completeness which none of the others (not even the fifth) can boast of: and we could almost suspect that Euclid, having arranged his materials in his own mind, and having completely elaborated the tenth book, wrote the preceding books after it, and did not live to revise them thoroughly.
Side 77 - VI.), king of Parthia, and appears to have been one of the most powerful of the Bactrian kings, and to have greatly extended his dominions ; but all the events of his reign are involved in the greatest obscurity and confusion. It seems probable that he established his power in Bactria proper, while Demetrius, the son of Euthydemus, still reigned in the Indian provinces south of the Paropamisus...

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