Cicero on Oratory and Orators: With His Letters to Quintus and Brutus (E-bok fra Google)

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H.G. Bohn, 1871 - 522 sider
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Review: Cicero on Oratory and Orators (Landmarks in Rhetoric and Public Address)

Brukerevaluering  - Robyn - Goodreads

who can write this much? it's good stuff... but the man obviously loved himself. Les hele vurderingen

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Side 300 - Piso, said that a countless sum of money had been given to Magius4 the governor, and Scaurus tried to refute him, by alleging the poverty of Magius, You mistake me, Scaurus, said he, for I do not say that Magius has saved it, but that, like a man gathering nuts without his clothes, he has put it into his belly. Or, as when Marcus Cicero6 the elder, the father of that excellent man our friend, said, That the men of our times were like the Syrian slaves ; the more Greek they knew, the greater knaves...
Side 196 - ... receive also this pleasure and delight from the study of the law, that you will then most readily comprehend how far our ancestors excelled other nations in wisdom, if you compare our laws with those of their Lycurgus, Draco, and Solon. It is indeed incredible how undigested and almost ridiculous is all civil law except our own ; on which subject I am accustomed to say much in my daily conversation, when I am praising the wisdom of our countrymen above that of all other men, and especially of...
Side 181 - But in my daily exercises I used, when a youth, to adopt chiefly that method which I knew that Caius Carbo, my adversary, generally practised ; which was, that having selected some nervous piece of poetry, or read over such a portion of a speech as I could retain in my memory, I used to declaim upon what I had been reading in other words, chosen with all the judgment that I possessed. But at length I perceived that in that method there was this inconvenience, that Ennius, if I exercised myself on...
Side 182 - The poets must also be studied; an acquaintance must be formed with history; the writers and teachers in all the liberal arts and sciences must be read, and turned over, and must, for the sake of exercise, be praised, interpreted, corrected, censured, refuted; you must dispute on both sides of every question ; and whatever may seem maintainable on any point, must be brought forward and illustrated. The civil law must be thoroughly studied ; laws in general must be understood; all antiquity must be...
Side 195 - Ithaca, fixed, like a little nest, among the roughest of rocks, to immortality itself, — with what affection ought we to be warmed toward such a country as ours, which, pre-eminently above all other countries, is the seat of virtue, empire and dignity? Its spirit, customs, and discipline ought to be our first objects of study, both because our country is the parent of us all, and because as much wisdom must be thought to have been employed in framing such laws, as in establishing so vast and powerful...
Side 270 - For mankind make far more determinations through hatred, or love, or desire, or anger, or grief, or joy, or hope, or fear, or error, or some other affection of mind, than from regard to truth, or any settled maxim, or principle of right, or judicial form, or adherence to the laws.
Side 180 - Writing is said to be the best and most excellent modeler and teacher of oratory; and not without reason; for if what is meditated and considered easily surpasses sudden and extemporary speech, a constant and diligent habit of writing will surely be of more effect than meditation and consideration itself; since all the arguments relating to the subject on which we write, whether they are suggested by art, or by a certain power of genius and understanding, will present themselves, and occur to us,...
Side 147 - ... and a multitude of examples is to be kept in the memory; nor is the knowledge of laws in general, or of the civil law in particular, to be neglected. And why need I add any remarks on delivery itself, which is to be ordered by action of body, by gesture, by look, and by modulation and variation of the voice, the great power of which, alone and in itself, the comparatively trivial art of actors and the stage proves...
Side 479 - from what has just been mentioned, that a pure and correct style is the groundwork, and the very basis and foundation, upon which an Orator must build his other accomplishments: though, it is true, that those who had hitherto possessed it, derived it more from early habit, than from any principles of art. It is needless to refer you to the instances of...
Side 147 - What can I say of that repository for all things, the memory, which, unless it be made the keeper of the matter and words that are the fruits of thought and invention, all the talents of the orator, we see, though they be of the highest degree of excellence, will be of no avail...

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