"Drifting About"; Or, What "Jeems Pipes, of Pipesville," Saw-and-did. An Autobiography by Stephen C. Massett. With Many Comic Illustrations by Mullen (E-bok fra Google)

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Carleton, 1863 - 371 sider
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Some of the Troublos of a Wandering Minstrel
242
LXXVtLola Montez
247
The Columbia River
249
LXXIXAstoria
251
A Running Trip from Portland to Corvalleaits Perils
253
The other Land of Gold
259
An Exciting Occurrence at Savage Island in the South Pacific Ocean
260
Melbourne
266
A Christmas Dinner at the French Consuls
270
LXXXT Rambles through the Colonies
272
How I got to my Hotel
280
On the Wing
281
Concert Saloons
282
My Concert in Bendigo
283
XCSydney
290
XCLA Visit to the Lunatic Asylum at Paramatta
294
XCIXI meet with an Old Schoolfellow
297
I am Patronized by his Excellency the Governor and Suite
299
Amusing Letter from an Agent
300
Still Moving On
302
XCV1 Off for India
304
XCVH Bombay
306
A Visit to the Caves of Elephanta
308
Blowing Away from the Guns
311
CA Word at Parting
320
CLCalcutta
321
I meet with Captain Hall after an absence of Twenty Years
323
CHI StreetsHotelsetc eta etc
325
Voyage from Calcutta to Suez
326
Aden
327
Suez
328
CVHI Shepards British Hotel
329
CXSomething about the Pyramids
332
About Cotton
334
Alexandria
337
Southampton
340
London once again 841
341
The Event and what Occurred
342
Mr Shirley Brooks
345
CXYII The Derby Day
346
CXVIIXThe Garrick Club
347
Charles Dickenss First Reading in London
349
CXXThe Shakespeare Dinner at the Garrick Club
350
Hanging at the Old Bailey
351
A Visit to Doctors Commons London and to the Sur rogates Office New York The Contrast
354
The Hon Mrs Norton
357
Leave England for New York
359
Undercliff
361
Washington Irving
362
My First Concert at Nibloa
365
First Concert in Boston
366
Off Again to California
367

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Populære avsnitt

Side 29 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Side 63 - I know our country disposition well ; In Venice they do let heaven see the pranks They dare not show their husbands ; their best conscience Is not to leave undone, but keep unknown.
Side 265 - The bridegroom may forget the bride Was made his wedded wife yestreen ; The monarch may forget the crown ' That on his head an hour has been ; The mother may forget the child That smiles sae sweetly on her knee ; But I'll remember thee, Glencairn, And a' that thou hast done for me ! " LINES, SENT TO SIR JOHN WHITEFORD, OF WHITEFORD, BART.
Side 136 - My name is Norval: on the Grampian hills My father feeds his flocks; a frugal swain, Whose constant cares were to increase his store, And keep his only son, myself, at home. For I had heard of battles, and I longed To follow to the field some warlike lord : And Heaven soon granted what my sire denied.
Side 172 - Now comes the most wonderful of all. " Sir, venturing too near a powder-mill at Faversham, I was, by a sudden explosion, blown into a million of atoms ; by this unpleasant accident I was rendered unfit for my business (a banker's clerk); but, hearing of your...
Side 331 - Consider the lilies how they grow: they toil not, neither do they spin; and yet I say unto you, that Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.
Side 16 - Sally has a cross old granny.' " ' « 'Oh! ' " ' "Heave and fall — -jib-halyards — hoist away." ' "Oh! dear— oh! dear." ' "The clumsy brute has half-killed the girl! — Don't cry, my dear." ' "Pick up the child, Tom, and shove it out of the way.
Side 201 - Now let there be the merry sound of music and of dance, Through thy corn-fields green, and sunny vines, oh pleasant land of France ! And thou, Rochelle, our own Rochelle, proud city of the waters, Again let rapture light the eyes of all thy mourning daughters. As thou wert constant in our ills, be joyous in our joy, For cold, and stiff, and still are they who wrought thy walls annoy.
Side 186 - Here he may many a time have sat when a boy, watching the slowly revolving spit with all the longing of an urchin ; or of an evening, listening to the cronies and gossips of Stratford, dealing forth churchyard tales and legendary anecdotes of the troublesome times of England. In this chair, it is the custom of every one that visits the house, to sit ; whether this be done with the hope of imbibing any of the inspiration of the bard, I am at a loss to say...
Side 220 - Boulevard des Italiens in particular, and those adjacent, present on a fine autumnal evening a scene of the utmost gaiety ; the effect is indescribable ; a confusion of colours and images bursts upon the eye, and the whiteness of the houses, broken at intervals by dark masses of verdure, form a beautiful contrast to the blaze of light issuing from the splendid

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