A History of the Church in nine books, from A.D.324 to A.D.440 (E-bok fra Google)

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S. Bagster, 1846 - 448 sider
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IAt
4
Conversion of several distant nations Chap VII Conversion of the Iberians 5
57
Conversion of the Armenians and Persians 5h Chap IX Persecution of Christians in Persia under Sapor
59
Martyrdom of Christians under Sapor 62
62
Continuation of the persecution
63
Martyrdom of Tarbula the sister of Symeon
64
Martyrdom of St Acepsimus
65
Martyrdom of many bishops in Persia
66
Letter of Constantine to Sapor in behalf of the Christians
67
Restoration of Eusebius and Theognis to their bishoprics
68
Election of Athanasius to the bishopric of Alexandria
70
Refusal of Athanasius to admit Arius into communion
72
Council of Antioch Deposition of Eustnthius
75
Relapse of Eusebius and Theognis into the errors of Arius
76
Machinations of the Arians and Mcletians against Athana sius 77
77
Calumny respecting Athanasius and the hand of Arsenius
79
Conversion of Indian nations
81
Council of Tyre Deposition of Athanasius
84
Erection and dedication of a church in Jerusalem
87
Chap XXVII Recall of Arius from exile his formulary of faith
88
Letter of Constantine Exile of Athanasius
91
Refusal of Alexander bishop of Constantinople to admit Arius into communion Death of Arius
93
Account given by Athanasius of the death of Arius
95
Fresh troubles arise in the church of Alexandria Letter of Constantine
96
Law enacted by Constantine against heresy
97
Marcellus bishop of Ancyra his heresy and deposition
99
Death and burial of Constantine
100
The History BOOK IIX Pages 103145
103
Return of Athanasius from exile
104
Chap Ill Paul bishop of Constantinople Heresy of Macedonius
105
Sedition at the ordination of Paul
106
Council of Antioch
107
Bishopric of Alexandria refused by Eusebius and accepted by Gregory
111
Letter of Julius bishop of Roine
113
Ejection of Paul and Athanasius
115
Chapter Dispute concerning Athanasius between the bishop of Roine and the Eastern bishops 116
116
Council of Sardica 118
118
Deposition of the Eastern by the Western bishops
120
Chap XIIL Schism between the churches of the East and of the West
121
Of the holy men who flourished in Egypt at this period
123
Didymus the blind and Aetiu9 the heretic
130
Piety of St Ephraim
132
Progress of Christianity
136
Chap xvtu Religious sentiments of the sons of Constantine
137
Council of Ariminum
138
Return of Athanasius to Alexandria
139
Letter of Constantius in behalf of Athanasius
141
Letter from the Council of Jerusalem in favour of Athana sius
142
Chap xxni Innocence of Athanasius acknowledged by Valens and Ursacius
143
Chap xxrv Letter written by Valens and Ursacius to Athanasius
144
The Histoby BOOK IV Pages 146201
146
Chap in Martyrdom of Martyrius and Marcian
147
Military expeditions of Constantius
148
Appearance of the sign of the Cross in the heavens
149
Chap vn Death of Magncntius Silvanus and Gallus
152
Arrival of Constantius at Rome Cabals of the Arians against Athanasius
154
Council of Milan Banishment of Athanasius
155
Miraculous escape of Athanasius Cruelty of George
157
Exile of Liberius bishop of Rome
159
Heresy of Aetius
161
Chap XIIL Letter of George bishop of Laodicea 1 S3 Chap XIV Letter of Constantius against Eudoxius
164
Return of Liberius to Rome
166
Chap XVL Earthquake at Nicomedia
167
Council of Ariminum
173
Letter from the Council to Constantius
174
Reply of the emperor Second letter of the Council
177
Persecution of those who held that the Son is consub stantial with the Father
180
Chap XXL Persecution of the Novatians in Paphlagonia Translation of the body of Constantine
182
Chap XXIL Council of Seleucia
183
The deputies of the Council of Seleucia accept the formulary of the Council of Ariminum
190
Heresy of Macedonius defended by Marathonius
196
The History BOOK V Pages 202247
202
Chap IIL Progress of the Christian religion impeded by Julian
209
Death of George
215
Character and miracles of Hilarion Martyrdom of some
221
Dispute between the partizans of Macedonius and
227
Julian strives to destroy Christianity without having
234
Statue of Jesus Christ Fountain of Emmaus Tree
243
The History BOOK VI Pages 248
322
Visions concerning the death of Julian
251
Proclamation of Jovian
254
Council of Antioch Letter from the council to Jovian
255
Virtues of Athanasius recognised by Jovian
257
Death of Jovian Proclamation of Valentinian
258
Chap VIL Council of Lampsacus
260
Revolt and death of Procopius
262
Persecution of those who adhered to the doctrines of Nicaja
263
Persecution of the orthodox by Valens
264
Formulary of faith drawn up by the Macedonians
266
Persecution of monks in Egypt
278
Chap XXL Firm adherence of the Scythians to the Christian faith
280
Chap xxn The Holy Ghost declared to be of the same substance as the Father and the Son
281
Death of Liberius Contest between Damasis and Ursinus
282
Election of Ambrose to the bishopric of Milan
285
Heresies propounded by Apollinarius
287
Innovation concerning the rite of baptism introduced by Eunomius
290
Heresy of Eunomius condemned by the holy ascetics of this period
294
Account of the ascetics who flourished in Egypt
295
Celebrated monks of Thebais
297
Monks of Scetis
303
Monasteries of Nitria
304
Monks of Palestine
306
Celebrated ascetics of Syria 30s Chap XXXIV Account of the monks who dwelt near Edessa
308
Persecution of Philosophers by Valens
310
Death of Valentinian Proclamation of Valentinian the younger
312
Chap xxxvn Christianity embraced by the Goths
313
War between the Romans and Saracens Conversion of the latter nation 317
317
Peter installed in the government of the Churches of Egypt
320
Death of Valens
321
Thk HistoryBOOK VII Pages 323372
323
Dissension between the followers of Meletius and of Pau linus
325
Baptism of Theodosius Law against diversity in religious opinions
326
Chap Expulsion of Demophilus the Arian bishop from Constan tinople
327
Intrigues of the Arians Eloquence of Eunomius
328
Council of Constantinople
331
Election of Ncctarius to the see of Constantinople
332
Decrees of the Council of Constantinople
333
Humility of Martyrius Translation of the body of Paul
335
Flavian ordained to the bishopric of Antioch
336
Attempt to establish uniformity in religion
337
Tyranny of Maximus The Empress Justina and Ambrose Death of Gratian
339
Birth of Honorius
341
Demolition of Pagan temples and consequent sedition
342
Regulations of Ncctarius concerning Penance
345
Errors of Eunomius Theophronius and Eutychus
348
New heresy introduced by the Novatians Feast of the Passover
350
Digression on the diversity prevailing in different churches on points of discipline
354
Progress of Christianity Demolition of Pagan temples Inundation of the Nile
356
Discovery of the head of John the Baptist
357
Death of Valentinian the younger Revolt of Eugenius
359
Sedition at Antioch The wrath of the emperor appeased by Flavian
361
Massacre at Thessalonica Intrepidity of Ambrose bishop of Milan
363
Miracles performed by Donatus and Theotimus
366
Miracles of St Epiphanius
367
Exemplary conduct of Acacius bishop of Beroea of Zeno and of Ajax
369
Discovery of the relics of Habakkuk and Micah Death of Theodosius
371
The Histort BOOK VIII Pages 373420
373
John establishes discipline among the clergy and reconciles Flavian with the Pope
379
Death of Gamas
380
Eloquence of John Miracle wrought ly him
383
Asia and Phrygia visited by John
384
History and death of Eutropius
386
Chap vin Ministry of John Chrysostom Effects of his preaching
387
Advice given by John to Olympiadc Murmurs of the clergy against him 388
390
Dispute in Egypt concerning the nature of the Deity
391
Chap xn Enmity of Theophilus against four monks called the Great Brothers
392
The monks appeal to John bishop of Constantinople
394
Books of Origen condemned by Eugenius He excites the people against John
395
Conference between Epiphanius and the Great Brothers
398
Chap XVI Enmity of the empress against John
399
Council held by Theophilus Condemnation of John
400
Sedition of the people Recall of John
402
Chap xrx Departure of Theophilus Restoration of John
404
Statue of the empress Deposition of John 40G Chap XXI Attempt against the life of John
407
Departure of John 4og Chap xxni Arsacius obtains the bishopric of John Persecution of the followers of John
410
Cruelty perpetrated upon a reader a priest and a pious lady
412
Troubles excited by Stilicho
414
Letter of Innocent bishop of Rome
415
Chap XXVH Death of the Empress Eudoxia Death of Arsacius Elec tion of Atticus
418
Efforts of Innocent to convene a council and obtain the restoration of John Death of John
420
The History BOOK IX Pages 421442
421
Discovery of the relics of forty martyrs
423
Commendations on Pulcheria and her sisters
426
Peace concluded with several nations while others are dispersed
428
Siege of Rome
429
Embassy despatched to Alaric
430
Chap VIH Proclamation of Attains He yields to Honorius
431
I
1
Surrender of Rome
433
Virtue of a Roman lady
434
Defeat of tyrants in the West
435
Constantine and Constans retire to Aries
436
Maximus at the instigation of Gerontius accepts the insignia of imperial power
437
Defeat and death of Edovicus
438
Ordination of Constantino His death
439
Death of Honorius His successors Prosperity of the two empires
440
Discovery of the relics of Zechariah the prophet and of Stephen the protomartyr
441

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Populære avsnitt

Side 186 - ... of books; but of the principal isles and of his estate and of his law, I shall tell you some part. This Emperor Prester John is Christian, and a great part of his country also. But yet, they have not all the articles of our faith as we have. They believe well in the Father, in the Son and in the Holy Ghost. And they be full devout and right true one to another.
Side 48 - But when he had advanced thus far, God appeared to him by night, and commanded him to seek another site for his city. Led by the hand of God, he arrived at Byzantium in Thrace, beyond Chalcedon in Bithynia, and here he was desired to build his city, and to render it worthy of the name of Constantine. In obedience to the command of God, he therefore enlarged the city formerly called Byzantium, and surrounded it with high walls ;2 he also erected magnificent dwelling-houses, and being aware that the...
Side 237 - He divided this work into twenty-four parts, to each of which he appended the name of one of the letters of the Greek alphabet, according to their number and order. He also wrote come-dies in imitation of Menander, tragedies resembling those of Euripides, and odes on the model of Pindar.
Side 252 - Church, and consulting concerning the best measures to be adopted. After much deliberation, two individuals arose in the midst of the assembly, desired the others to be of good cheer, and departed, as if to deprive Julian of the imperial power. He who saw this vision did not attempt to pursue his journey, but awaited, in horrible suspense, the conclusion of the revelation. He laid himself down to sleep again, in the same place, and again he saw the same assembly : the two individuals who had appeared...
Side 23 - ... gardens. They had also, he informs us, sacred edifices which were called monasteries, in which they dwelt apart and alone, occupied in celebrating the holy mysteries, and in worshipping God with psalms and hymns. They never tasted food before sunset, and some only took food every third day, or even at longer intervals. Finally, he says that on certain days they lay on the ground and abstained from wine and the flesh of animals ; that their food was bread, salt, and hyssop, and their drink, water;...
Side 132 - Nisibis, or his family was of the neighboring territory. He devoted his life to monastic philosophy ; and although he received no instruction, he became, contrary to all expectation, so proficient in the learning and language of the Syrians, that he comprehended with ease the most abstruse theorems of philosophy. His style of writing was so replete with splendid oratory and with richness and temperateness of thought that he surpassed the most approved writers of Greece. If the works of these writers...
Side 30 - He fell into absurd discourses, so that he had the audacity to preach in the church what no one before him had ever suggested; namely, that the Son of God was made out of that which had no prior existence, that there was a period of time in which he existed not; that, as possessing free will, he was capable of vice and virtue, and that he was created and made...
Side 32 - ... from Alexander, Arius sent messengers to Paulinas, bishop of Tyre, to Eusebius Pamphilus, who presided over the church of Caesarea in Palestine, and to Patrophilus, bishop of Scythopolis, soliciting permission for himself and for his adherents, as they had previously attained the rank of presbyters, to form the people who were with them into a church. For it was the custom in Alexandria, as it still is in the present day, that all the churches should be under one bishop, but that each presbyter...
Side 9 - Sopater,5 the philosopher, who was then master of the school of Plotinus, concerning the means of purification from guilt. The philosopher — so the story goes — replied that such moral defilement could admit of no purification. The emperor was grieved at this repulse, but happening to...
Side 428 - Moesia, called Castra Martis, and thence made incursions into the rest of Thrace, and insolently refused to enter into terms of alliance with the Romans. The prefect of the Thracian soldiers made propositions of peace to him, but he replied by pointing to the sun, and declaring that it would be easy to him, if he desired to do so, to subjugate every region of the earth that is enlightened by that luminary.

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