Language History, Language Change, and Language Relationship: An Introduction to Historical and Comparative Linguistics

Forside
Walter de Gruyter, 1. jan. 1996 - 602 sider
1 Anmeldelse
Why does language change? Why can we speak to and understand our parents but have trouble reading Shakespeare? Why is Chaucer's English of the fourteenth century so different from Modern English of the late twentieth century that the two are essentially different languages? Why are Americans and English 'one people divided by a common language'? And how can the language of Chaucer and Modern English - or Modern British and American English - still be called the same language? The present book provides answers to questions like these in a straightforward way, aimed at the non-specialist, with ample illustrations from both familiar and more exotic languages.
  

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Innhold

Introduction
3
Appendix to Chapter
22
The discovery of IndoEuropean
35
3
42
4
50
8
56
II
59
12
63
Language dialect and standard
321
Dialect
346
4
356
guages
364
2
371
4
382
Dialectology beyond language boundaries
393
4
403

Its history and its decipherment
65
14
75
alphabets
81
Sound change
113
Analogy and change in word structure
153
Syntactic change
189
Semantic change
215
Synonymy and homonymy
223
Lexical borrowing
253
The study of words
292
1
297
5
411
Pidgins
418
Metaphor
446
Establishing language relationship
455
ProtoWorld? The question of longdistance genetic
485
Linguistic
507
Chapter notes and suggested readings
536
2
544
Copyright acknowledgments
555
Indexes
585
Opphavsrett

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Referanser til denne boken

Alle boksøkresultater »

Bibliografisk informasjon