Narrative of Thirty-four Years' Slavery and Travels in Africa (E-bok fra Google)

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Sir. Richard Phillips and Company, 1819 - 42 sider
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Side 14 - But nothing," continues Dumont, " could exceed the horrors of what we endured one day from the prison taking fire, with all the slaves shut up in it. Though no lives were lost, our beards and hair were partly consumed. The water intended for our use was turned off to extinguish the flames. The heat and the torrents of smoke were suffocating, so that we foamed at the mouth, and at one time we were in apprehension of being burnt alive. No one thought of unloosing us, probably from a dread of some confusion...
Side 32 - ... eight olives, allowed him daily. At Algiers he remained eight months. At length, the great deliverer, Lord Exmouth, appeared before Algiers, and obtained the surrender of all the Christian slaves of every nation. Dumont adds, " We were taken in by a number of English boats, and there it was that our last chains fell off, not without the deep sighs and regrets of three thousand renegadoes, who despaired of obtaining deliverance, and cursed the day wherein they apostatized from the Christian faith.
Side 5 - Crillon, both of them with their suit alighted, and all lay flat on the ground, to shun the effects of a bomb that fell near a part of the barracks where a French woman had a canteen. This woman, with two children on her arm, rushes forth, sits with the utmost sangfroid on the bomb shell, puts out the match, and thus extricates from danger all that were 47 o around her.
Side 14 - But nothing"' continues Dumont, "could exceed the horrors of what we endured one day, from the prison taking fire, with all the slaves shut up in it. Though no lives were lost, our beards and hair were partly consumed. The water intended for our' use was turned off, to extinguish the flames. The heat and the torrents of smoke were suffocating, so that we foamed at the mouth ; and at one time, we were in apprehension of being burnt alive. No one thought of...
Side 12 - There are always," says Dumont, " a hundred and fifty armed men to watch over the safety of an hundred slaves. But though the Koubals are incessantly on the lookout, it will not prevent the lion from sometimes carrying off its prey, if greatly pressed by hunger. One remarkable circumstance is, that the...
Side 10 - says Dumont, " was allowed us to lie on, with a stone for a pillow, and permission to sleep if we could. "Although I felt my wounds extremely painful, particularly one inflicted by a lance, I was compelled to labour with the rest at six every morning, dragging along my chain. Our food for the day was three ears of Indian corn, which were thrown to us as if we were dogs.
Side 13 - Koubals are incessantly on the look out, it will not prevent the lion from sometimes carrying off its prey, if greatly pressed by hunger. One remarkable circumstance is, that the shouts and outcries of men will drive the wild beasts back into the woods ; whereas, peals of musketry draw numbers of them out of the forest, as if curiosity formed some part of their instinct.
Side 5 - ... around her. Numbers were witnesses of this incident ; and his highness granted her a pension of three francs a day, and promised to promote her husband after the siege. The Duke de Crillon imitated the prince's generosity, and insured to her likewise a payment of five francs a day.
Side 17 - I received such a blow across rny loins, that I fainted away and lost my breath. But soon recovering, I grasped a large stone and threw it with such force at the head of the kail, that, hitting his eye, the latter was forced from the socket. I then darted at his breast, and remained fixed to it till obliged to relax from my hold, by the united blows of the keepers on all parts of my body. After such an example as this of insubordination and revolt, The mule was stopped in the presence of Osman, who...
Side 15 - ... and disorder ; and only the usual quantities of water were dealt out to us, at the usual times : nor was this all ; for a liberal distribution of the bamboo ensued, applied to some for setting fire to the place from negligence, to others, for not foreseeing the accident, and to others for an imputed criminal intention, as if they would take advantage of such an opportunity to effect their escape.

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