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List of correspondence between the Department of State and the Entoy

Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of her Catholic Majesty near the government of the United States.

Mr. Calderon to Mr. Clayton, 31st May, 1850, with enclosure.
Mr. Calderon conimunicates, 1st June, 1850, copy of a letter from Span-

ish consul at Philadelphia.
Mr. Clayton to Mr. Calderon, 3d June, 1850.
The same to the same, 4th June, 1850, with enclosure.
The same to the same, 4th June, 1850.
Mr. Calderon communicates, on the 5th June, 1851), copy of a letter from

Spanish consul at New York.
Mr. Clayton to Mr. Calderon, 7th June, 1850, with enclosure.
Mr. Calderon to Mr. Clayton, 7th June, 1850.
The same to the same, 14th June, 1851), with enclosure.
The same to the same, 24th June, 1850.
Mr. Clayton to Mr. Calderon, 25th June, 1850.
Mr. Calderon to Mr. Clayton, 28th June, 1850, with enclosure.
The same to the same, Sth July, 1850.
Mr. Clayton to Mr. Calderon, 9th July, 1850.
Mr. Calderon to Mr. Clayton, 17th July, 1850.
The same to Mr. Webster, 26th July, 1850.
The same to the same, 27th July, 1850.
'The same to the same, 30th July, 1850, with enclosure.

The same to the same, 20th August, 1850.
Mr. Webster to Mr. Calderon, 30 September, 1850, with enclosures.
Mr. Calderon to Mr. Webster, 27th September, 1850.
Mr. Calderon to Mr. Webster, 1st October, 1850.
Mr. Webster to Mr. Calderon, 3d October, 1850, with enclosure.
Mr. Calderon to Mr. Webster, 10th October, 1850, with enclosure.
The same to the same, 10th October, 1850.
The same to the same, 14th October, 1850.
Mr. Derrick, acting Secretary of State, to Mr. Calderon, 4th November,

1850, with enclosure.
Mr. Calderon to Mr. Webster, 16th November, 1850, with enclosure.
The same to the same, 28th November, 1950, with enclosure.
The same to the same, 8th January, 1851.
The same to the same, 17th January, 1851, without enclosure.
Mr. Webster to Mr. Calderon, 220 January, 1851.
Mr. Calderon to Mr. Webster, 24th January, 1851, with enclosure.
The same to the same, 28th January, 1851, with enclosure.
Mr. Webster to Mr. Calderon, 30th January, 1851, with enclosure.

Mr. Calderon de la Barca to Mr. Clayton.

[Translation.]

LEGATION OF SPAIN IN WASHINGTON,

May 31, 1850. In his note of the 27th instant the undersigned, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of her Catholic Majesty, applied, in pursiiance of his duty, for the enforcement of the existing laws of the United States, not only against the wrong-headed Lopez and his so called aid-de-camp Yznaga, but against the rest of the pirates, who, on being routed at Cardenas, had run into Key West on board the steamer “Creole” for shelter, and are now disappearing from that place one after the other.

The undersigned takes pleasure in acknowledging that he has received from both his excellency the upright and illustrious General Taylor, President of the republic, and from the honorable the Secretary of State, the most positive assurances not only of their unqualified disapprobation of this execrable piratical outrage, but of their firm resolution to maintain the inviolability of treaties, and to enforce obedience to the existing laws. These assurances, verbally given on this occasion, have been communicated by nie, with entire confidence and thorough conviction of their sincerity, to the government of her Majesty, as also to the most excellent Captain General of the island of Cuba. In the mean time, this high functionary has addressed to the undersigned, under date of the 22d instant, a communication of which he has the honor of enclosing a literal copy to the honorable Secretary of State. In it the Hon. John M. Clayton will find an exact account of all the pccurrences that have taken place, and irrefragable evidence of the commission of the crime.

The undersigned also encloses a literal copy of another communication which he received at the same time from the Admiral Don Francisco Ar. mero, then at Key West, and written on the 22d May instant, on board her Catholic Majesty's war steamer Pizarro. The perusal of it shows most clearly the noble motives which prevented him from attacking the steamer “Creole” while in pursuit of her. Having once entered the waters of a friendly port, he understood that the right of trying the pirates belonged to the government of the United States. In return for ihis proceeding, which harmonized so well with the friendly relations subsisting between the two countries, he had the grievous mortification to see the pirates land with their arms, carrying away, without let or hindrance, whatever the steamer “Creole” had brought over, and without any attempt being made to hoist the flag of the collector of the port on board of her until after everything had been removed; all this occurring in sight of two pilot boats, with the American flag of war flying on board of each, and after the Spanish admiral had actually made known to them the act of aggression which the pirates had committed. In view of both these documents, it becomes the duty of the undersigned to request, as he does formally request, accordingly: Firstly, that energetic efforts may be made by the government of the United States in order fully to carry out the spirit of the treaties which bind them to Spain, and also in order that severe punishment may be administered to all those who may have organized, or may organize within the limits and jurisdiction of the republic, any revolutionary expedition against Spain or her colonial provinces: Secondly, that the honorable Secretary of State will give him assur. ances in writing, for the purpose of their being forwarded to the government of her Majesty, to this effect: that the government of the United States, in consideration of the friendly relations existing between them and Spain, is determined to execute its own laws, and to adopt all the means in their power in order to secure the arrest, trial, and punishment of all those who have taken part in the piratical attempt.

The undersigned requests further, in the strongest and most urgent manner, that the Hon. Secretary of State will take into serious consideration, and that he will cause the most excellent President to understand, the great importance of these assurances, especially at the present time, in order to produce a complete and abiding confidence in the mind of her Majesty and of her government. The undersigned believes this to be highly necessary, in consideration of the vast and important mercantile and other relations of all kinds existing between the two nations.

The undersigned renews to the Hon. John M. Clayton, Secretary of State, the earnest assurance of his most distinguished consideration.

A. CALDERON DE LA BARCA. Hon. John M. Clayton,

Secretary of State of the United States.

{ Translation. ]

Her Catholic MAJESTY'S STEAMER PIZARRO. Most ExcELLENT SIR: Yesterday morning I anchored in this port soon after the entrance into the same of the steamer Creole,” which I had been in chase of from the coasts of Cuba, in consequence of her having, on the night of the 18th instant, made an attempt to surprise the small detachment of troops constituting the garrison of the village of Car. denas; but as, after the lapse of a few hours, the aggressors were completely beaten by the peasantry and some troops which had managed to reach the place, the consequence was that they had to embark again on the night of the 19th, with some loss, and to steer their course for this port, which they succeeded in reaching by keeping close to the chain of sand.banks which skirts the American shore to the eastward, and whose shallow waters did not allow the vessel upon which I am to follow

The “ Creole" left New Orleans conjointly with a barque and a brig schooner, (bergantine goleta,) having on board an expedition of armed men destined for the coast of Cuba; but the two latter vessels having been captured by me, the steamer alone was enabled to accomplish the vandalic object in the manner which has been specified to your excel. lency; and although the said steamer was suspecied of being American, yet it was with astonishment, most excellent sir, that I saw her hoist the flag of the American Union, after the perpetration of the crime, as she was approaching Key West, and that, shortly after coming alongside a wharf, the men she had on board landed, with their arms, and took pos. session of one of the public buildings of the village. A few moments before all this took place, I had passed them within a very short distance; but I had already abandoned the idea of pursuing them, because I had

understood that the right of passing judgment upon them belonged to the government of the United States. This mode of proceeding, harmonizing so well with the friendly relations existing between the two nations, did not permit me to doubt but that, on their part, the authorities of Key West, although they might extend to the fugitives the shelter and protection which their situation required, would immediately after take steps to have them disarmed and secured; but as neither of these proceedings have taken place, I sent a communication to our consul, a copy of which (marked No. 1) I enclose to your excellency; and although 24 hours have elapsed, I have not been able to obtain any other result than that of causing the confiscation flag of the collector of Key West to be hoisted on board the aforesaid steamer, after she had been completely deserted, nor have I received any other reply than that which accompa. nies this, (marked No. 2,) with the exception of a verbal explanation from both functionaries to the effect that these villages are at the mercy of any band of pirates that may come into their parts, with the booty which the plander of the adjacent coasts supplies them. This circumstance induced me, in order to protect the village of Key West from any accident, to offer them the assistance they stood in need of, but it was not accepted on their part.

These facts deserve that they should be made known by your excellency to the grıvernment of the United States, inasmuch as, while the admiral of a friendly nation who is pursuing a band of pirates that has just plundered a Spanish village abstains from attacking them as soon as they get near a port of the Union, these marauders not only attempt to hoist the American flag, but, fully armed, they invade the town, establish their quarters in it, and disembark their booty; all this occurring in sight of two revenue boats, (parlebotes) bearing the flag and pennant of war of the United States, and to whom I had previously communicated the outrage committed by the people on board the “Creole." May God preserve your excellency for many years !

On board ihe steamer designated above, at Key West, May 22, 1850, at six o'clock in the evening.

FRANCISCO AVENERO.

No. 1.

The Commander of the Pizarro 10 the Spanish consul at Key West.

(Translation )

HER CATHOLIC Majesty's STEAMER PIZARRO. I have this moment, half past one o'clock p. m., anchored in this port; having come hither in pursuit of a steamer which left the port of Car. denas, in the island of Cuba, yesterday, to which place she took four hun. dred marauders, who landed with arms, fired upon the troops and the people, stealing and committing crimes worthy only of pirates and va. grants. As soon as she arrived at this port the aforesaid steamer dis. played the American flag; and in view of that fact, it is indispensable that you should request the authorities of Key West to state immediately whether they recognise the vessel in question as American, and will extend to it the protection of their flag, in which case you will ask, in the name of her Catholic Majesty's government, for the detention of the vessel and passengers, as well as for the surrender of the person of the lieutenant governor of Cardenas, that of the captain commanding the detach: ment of troops at the same place, and of any other Spaniard whom the pirates may have on board. * You, and the people of Key West, have been eye witnesses of the high consideration I have shown to the American flag, since, after coming alongside of the aforesaid vessel in the vicinity of the port, I did not capture it, being well assured that the government of the United States, which is as much interested in the punishment of every act of piracy as that of the country most concerned in it, would have taken all the neces. sary steps in order to have that punishment administered. But in view of having myself witnessed the landing at this point of the people aforesaid, with their arms, I must repeat my request that you will ask of the authorities alluded to, and in the name of the nation you represent, their surrender, with whatever else the circumstances I have related to you may require.

May God preserve you for many years! On board the steamer men. tioned above, and from the anchorage in the port of Key West, May 2, 1850. The Commandant General of the naval forces of Spain in the Antilles,

FRANCISCO AVENERO. To H. C. Majesty's Consul at Key West.

No. 2.

T. A. Browns to the commander of the Spanish naval forces in the

Antilles.

[Translation.)

Most ExceLLENT SIR: In performing the duties which have been intrusted to me by your excellency, it is important I should tell you that I will not be able to accomplish all before to morrow morning early, when I will communicate to your excellency all that I have been able to do. May God preserve your excellency many years! Key West, May 21, 1850.

T. A. BROWNS. To the most Excellent the COMMANDANT GENERAL

of the Naval Forces of Spain in the Antilles.

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