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for brevity is only to be praised when, while it puts an end to unseasonable delays, it suppresses nothing which is well authenticated. 2. Gallus had hardly breathed his last in Noricum, when Apodemius, who as long as he lived had been a fiery instigator of disturbances, caught up his shoes and carried them off, journeying, with frequent relays of horses, so rapidly as even to kill some of them by excess of speed, and so brought the first news of what had occurred to Milan. And having made his way into the palace, he threw down the shoes before the feet of Constantius, as if he were bringing the spoils of a king of the Parthians who had been slain. And when this sudden news arrived that an affair so unexpected and difficult had been executed with entire facility in complete accordance with the wish of the emperor, the principal courtiers, according to their custom, exerting all their zeal in the path of flattery, extolled to the skies the virtue and good fortune of the emperor, at whose nod, as if they had been mere common soldiers, two princes had thus been deprived of their power, namely, Veteranio and Gallus. 3. And Constantius being exceedingly elated at the exquisite taste of this adulation, and thinking that he himself for the future should be free from all the ordinary inconveniences of mortality, now began to depart from the path of justice so evidently that he even at times laid claim to immortality; and in writing letters with his own hand, would style himself lord of the whole world; a thing which, if others had said, any one ought to have been indignant at, who laboured with proper diligence to form his life and habits in emulation of the constitutional princes who had preceded him, as he professed to do. 4. For even if he had under his power the infinities of worlds fancied by Democritus, as Alexander the Great, under the promptings of Anaxarchus, did fancy, yet either by reading, or by hearing others speak, he might have considered that (as mathematicians unanimously agree) the circumference of the whole earth, immense as it seems to us, is nevertheless not bigger than a pin's point as compared with the greatness of the universe.

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A.D. 354.] DANGER OF URSICINU2. 47

II.

§ 1. AND now, after the pitiable death of the Caesar, the
trumpet of judicial dangers sounded the alarm, and Ursi-
cinus was impeached of treason, envy gaining more and
more strength every day to attack his safety; envy which
is inimical to all powerful men.
2. For he was overcome by this difficulty, that, while
the ears of the emperor were shut against all defences
which were reasonable and easy of proof, they were open
to all the secret whispers of calumniators, who pretended
that his name was almost disused among all the districts of
the East, and that Ursicinus was urged by them both
privately and publicly to be their commander, as one who
could be formidable to the Persian nation.
3. But this magnanimous man stood his ground im-
movably against whatever might happen, only taking care
not to throw himself away in an abject manner, and
grieving from his heart that innocence had no safe founda-
tion on which to stand. And the more sad also for this
consideration, that before these events took place many of
his friends had gone over to other more powerful persons,
as in cases of official dignity the lictors go over to the
successors of former officers.
4. His colleague Arbetio was attacking him by cajol-
ing words of feigned good-will, often publicly speaking
of him as a virtuous and brave man; Arbetio being a man
of great cunning in laying snares for men of simple life,
and one who at that season enjoyed too much power.
For as a serpent that has its hole underground and hidden
from the sight of man observes the different passers-by,
and attacks whom it will with a sudden spring, so this man,
having been raised from being a common soldier of the
lowest class to the highest military dignities, without
having received any injury or any provocation, polluted
his conscience from an insatiable desire of doing mis-
chief.
5. Therefore, having a few partners in his secrets for
accomplices, he had secretly arranged with the emperor
when he asked his opinion, that on the next night Ursicinus
should be seized and carried away from the sight of the
soldiers, and so be put to death uncondemned, just as

formerly Domitius Corbulo, that faithful and wise defender of our provinces, is said to have been slain in the miserable period of Nero’s cruelty.

6. And after the matter had been thus ananged, while the men destined for the service of seizing Ursicinus were waiting for the appointed time, the emperor’s mind changed to mercy, and so this impious deed was put ofi' for further consideration.

7. Then the engine of calumny was directed against Julian, who had lately been brought to court; a prince who afterwards became memorable, but who was now attacked with a two-fold accusation, as the iniquity of his enemies thought requisite. First, that he had gone from the Park of Macellum, which lies in Cappadocia, into Asia, from a desire of acquiring polite learning. Secondly, that he had seen his brother as he passed through Constantinople.

8. And when he had explained away the charges thus brought against him, and had proved that he had not done either of these things without being ordered, he would still have perished through the intrigues of the abandoned court of fiatterers, if he had not been saved by the favour of the supreme Deity, with the assistance of Queen Eusebia. By her intercession he obtained leave to be conducted to the town of Como, in the neighbourhood of Milan; and after he had remained there a short time he was permitted to go to Greece for the purpose of cultivating his literary tastes, as he was very eager to do.

9. Nor were there wanting other incidents arising out of these occurrences, which might be looked upon as events under the direction of Providence, as some of them were rightly punished, while others failed of their design, proving vain and ineffective. But it occasionally happened that rich men, relying on the protection of those in oflice, and clinging to them as the ivy clings to lofty trees, bought acquittals at immense prices; and that poor men who had little or no means of purchasing safety were condemned out of hand. And therefore truth was overshadowed by falsehood, and sometimes falsehood obtained the authority of truth.

10. In these days Gorgonius also was summoned to court, the man who had been the Caesars principal cham

A.D. 354.] skvERE TREATMENT OF GALLUS's FRIENDS. 49

berlain. And though it was made plain by his own confession that he had been a partner in his undertakings, and sometimes a chief instigator of them, yet through the conspiracy of the eunuchs justice was overpowered by dexterously arranged falsehoods, and he was acquitted and so escaped the danger.

III.

§ 1. WHILE these events were taking place at Milan, battalions of soldiers were brought from the East to Aquileia, with a number of members of the court, who, being bloken in spirit, while their limbs were enfeebled by the weight of their chains, cursed the protraction of their lives which were surrounded with every variety of misery. For they were accused of having been the ministers of the ferocity of Gallus, and it was believed to be owing to them that Domitian had been torn to pieces, and that Montius and others had been brought to destruction.

2. Arboreus, and Eusebius, at that time high chamberlain, both men of insane arrogance, and equally unjust and cruel, were appointed to try these men. And they, without any careful examination, or making any distinction between the innocent and the guilty, condemned some to scourgings, others to torture and exile, some they adjudged to serve in the lowest ranks of the army, and the rest they condemned to death. And when they had thus filled the sepulchres with dead bodies, they returned as if in triumph. and brought an account of their exploits to the emperor, who was notoriously severe and implacable against all offences of the kind.

3. After this, throughout the rest of his reign, Constantius, as if resolved to reverse the prescribed arrangement of the Fates, behaved with greater violence than ever, and opened his heart to numbers of designing plotters. And owing to this conduct, many men arose who watched for all kinds of reports, at first attacking, as with the appetite of wild beasts, those in the enjoyment of the highest honours and rank, and afterwards both poor and rich indiscriminately. Not like those Cibyratae in the time of Verres, fawning on the tribunal of a single lieutenant, but harassing the limbs of the whole republic by means of all the evils that arose anywhere. 4. Among these men Paulus and Mercurius were especially conspicuous, the first a Dacian born, the latter a Persian. Mercurius was a notary, and Paulus had been promoted from being a steward of the emperor's table to a receivership in the provinces. Paulus, as I have already mentioned, had been nicknamed The Chain, because in weaving knots of calumnies he was invincible, scattering around foul poisons and destroying people by various means, as some skilful wrestlers are wont in their contests to catch hold of their antagonists by the heel. 5. Mercurius was nicknamed Count of Dreams, because as a dog fond of biting secretly fawns and wags his tail while full of inward spite) he forced his way into feasts and companies, and if any one in his sleep (when nature roves about with an extraordinary degree of freedom) communicated to a friend that he had seen anything, exaggerated it, colouring it for the most part with envenomed arts, and bore it to the open ears of the emperor. And for such speeches men were attacked with formidable accusations, as if they had committed inexpiable crimes. 6. The news of these events having got abroad, men were so cautious of even relating nocturnal dreams, that, in the presence of a stranger, they would scarcely confess they had slept at all. And some accomplished men lamented that they had not been born in the country of Mount Atlas, where it is said that dreams never occur, though what the cause of such a fact is, we must leave to those who are learned in such matters to decide. 7. Amid all these terrible investigations and punish. ments, another disaster took place in Illyricum, which from some empty words involved many in danger. At an entertainment given by Africanus, the governor of the second Pannonia, at Sirmium, some men having drunk rather too much, and thinking there was no witness of their proceedings, spoke freely of the existing imperial government, accusing it as most vexatious to the people. And some of them expressed a hope that a change, such as was wished for by all, might be at hand, affirming that * Herodotus, iv. 184, records that in Africa, in the country about Mount Atlas, dreams are unknown.

* Tlepolemus and Hiero, whom Cicero, Verres iii. 11, calls Cibyratici Cânes. R.

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