Celtic Mythology and Religion

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A. & W. Mackenzie, 1885 - 109 sider

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Side 81 - Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow, Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies Deep-meadow'd, happy, fair with orchard-lawns And bowery hollows crown'd with summer sea, Where I will heal me of my grievous wound.
Side 98 - This I give to thee, preserve thou my horses ; this to thee, preserve thou my sheep ; and so on.' After that, they use the same ceremony to the noxious animals : ' This I give to thee, O fox ! spare thou my lambs ; this to thee, O hooded crow ! this to thee, O eagle...
Side 98 - ... every one takes a cake of oatmeal, upon which are raised nine square knobs, each dedicated to some particular being, the supposed preserver of their flocks and herds, or to some particular animal, the real destroyer of them. Each person then turns his face to the fire, breaks off a knob, and flinging it over his shoulders, says, " This I give to thce, preserve thou my horses ; this to thee, preserve thou my sheep,
Side 41 - Thrice happy they beneath their northern skies, Who that worst fear — the fear of death — despise Hence they no cares for this frail being feel, But rush undaunted on the pointed steel ; Provoke approaching fate, and bravely scorn To spare that life which must so soon return.
Side 101 - The mistress and servants of each family take a sheaf of oats and dress it up in women's apparel, put it in a large basket, and lay a wooden club by it, and this they call Briid's Bed : and then the mistress and servants cry three times, Briid is come, Briid is welcome.
Side 89 - But shiv'ring horror in the branches heaves ; Black springs, with pitchy streams, divide the ground, And, bubbling, tumble with a sullen sound. Old images of forms mis-shapen stand, Rude and unknowing of...
Side 41 - If dying mortals' doom they sing aright, No ghosts descend to dwell in dreadful night ; No parting souls to grisly Pluto go, Nor seek the dreary silent shades below ; But forth they fly immortal in their kind, And other bodies in new worlds they find...
Side 97 - Every one, blind-fold, draws out a portion. He who holds the bonnet is entitled to the last bit. Whoever draws the black bit, is the devoted person who is to be sacrificed to Baal, whose favour they mean to implore in rendering the year productive of the sustenance of man and beast. There is little doubt of these inhuman sacrifices having been once offered in this country as well as in the East, although they now omit the act of sacrificing, and only compel the devoted person to leap three times...
Side 100 - Shony, I give you this cup of ale, hoping that you'll be so kind as to send us plenty of sea-ware, for enriching our ground the ensuing year ;' and so threw the cup of ale into the sea.
Side 100 - ... and so threw the cup of ale into the sea. This was performed in the night time. At his return to land they all went to church, where there was a candle burning upon the altar : and then standing silent for a little time, one of them gave a signal, at which the candle was put out, and immediately all of them went to the fields, where they fell a drinking their ale, and spent the remainder of the night in dancing and singing, &c.

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