The Emporium of Arts & Sciences, Volum 3

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John Redman Coxe, Thomas Cooper
J. Delaplaine, 1814
 

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Side 478 - THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY REFERENCE DEPARTMENT Thi...
Side 290 - m but five hours behind the sun ! When dress'd, I to the yard repair, And breakfast on the pure, fresh air : But though this choice Castalian cheer Keeps both the head and stomach clear, For reasons strong enough with me, I mend the meal with toast and tea.
Side 141 - ... to prevent the arch cracking across, or giving way edgewise. In forming an arch, the bricks must be coursed across the centre, and a grooved side of the bricks must face the workmen. The bricks may be either laid in mortar, or dry, and the interstices afterwards filled up by pouring in lime-putty, Paris plaster, or any other convenient material. The obvious advantages of arches constructed upon this principle, are, that the same centre, which, whatever be the breadth of the arch, may be in no...
Side 341 - ... they stamp the face of the block with the impression of the seal of the Duchy, which stamp is a permission for the owner to sell, and at the same time an assurance that the tin so marked has been purposely examined, and found merchantable...
Side 363 - ... extremely true, with a frame round it, or a groove cut in its edges, to keep the superfluous mercury from running off; secondly, lead weights covered with cloth, to keep them from scratching the glass, from one pound weight to twelve pounds each, according to the size of the glass laid down ; thirdly, rolls of tin-foil ; fourthly, mercury. The artist...
Side 352 - A mixture of equal parts of tin and lead, they called argentarium; a mixture of two parts of lead and one of tin, they call tertiarium ; and with equal parts of tertiarium and tin, that is, with two- parts of tin and one of lead, they tinned whatever vessels they thought fit. They, moreover, applied silver upon- copper, in the same way in which they applied tin upon it...
Side 437 - My exertions were,, however, of no avail; his disorder grew every day more and more untractable and malignant, so that I was in hourly expectation of his dissolution. Being under the necessity of taking a journey, before I set off, I went to see him, as I thought, for the last time; and I prepared his parents for the event of his death, which I considered as inevitable, and reconciled them in the best manner I was able to a loss which I knew they would feel severely.
Side 365 - ... into the globe intended to be silvered; the alloy should be poured into the globe by means of a paper or glass funnel reaching almost to the bottom of the globe, to prevent...
Side 363 - Cut the tinfoil a little larger than the glass every way, and lay it flat upon the stone ; and with a straight piece of hard wood, about three inches long, stroke it every way, that there be...
Side 444 - That wake at honour's, friendship's call ; " Benevolence, that unconfin'd, " Extends her liberal hand to all. " By sympathy's untutor'd voice, "Be taught her social laws to keep; " Rejoice, if human heart rejoice, " And weep, if human eye shall weep. " The heart, that bleeds for others woes, " Shall feel each selfish sorrow less ; " His breast, who happiness bestows, " Reflected happiness shall bless.

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