France and England in North America, Volum 7,Del 2

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Little, Brown, 1910

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Side 320 - I am glad of it," was his calm reply. He then asked how long he might survive, and was told that he had not many hours remaining. "So much the better," he said; "I am happy that I shall not live to see the surrender of Quebec.
Side 405 - He went to bed well last night, rose at six this morning as usual, looked, I suppose, if all his money was in his purse, and called for his chocolate. A little after seven he went into the...
Side 194 - I became proud, insolent, and intolerable, — these considerations will make me wish to leave the regiment before next winter ; that by frequenting men above myself I may know my true condition, and by discoursing with the other sex may learn some civility and mildness of carriage.
Side 273 - Most of the French writers of the time mention these barbarities without much comment, while Vaudreuil loudly denounces them. Yet he himself was answerable for atrocities incomparably worse, and on a far larger scale. He had turned loose his savages, red and white, along a frontier of six hundred miles, to waste, burn, and murder at will. " Women and children," such were the orders of Wolfe, " are to be treated with humanity ; if any violence is offered to a woman, the offender shall be punished...
Side 297 - Robison, afterward professor of natural philosophy in the University of Edinburgh. He used to tell in his later life how Wolfe, with a low voice, repeated Gray's " Elegy in a Country Churchyard " to the officers about him. Probably it was to relieve the intense strain of his thoughts. Among the rest was the verse which his own fate was soon to illustrate : — " The paths of glory lead but to the grave." " Gentlemen," he said, as his recital ended, " I would rather have written those lines than take...
Side 292 - The officers and men will remember what their country expects from them, and what a determined body of soldiers, inured to war, is capable of doing against five weak French battalions, mingled with a disorderly peasantry.
Side 437 - That we were, wilfully or ignorantly, deceived by our interpreter in regard to the word assassination, I do aver, and will to my dying moment ; so will every officer who was present. The interpreter was a Dutchman, little acquainted with the English tongue, therefore might not advert to the tone and meaning of the word in English ; but whatever his motives were for so doing, certain it is, we called it the death, or the loss, of the Sieur Jumonville.
Side 307 - It was towards ten o'clock when, from the high ground on the right of the line, Wolfe saw that the crisis was near. The French on the ridge had formed themselves into three bodies, regulars in the center, regulars and Canadians on right and left.
Side 308 - When the smoke rose, a miserable sight was revealed ; the ground cumbered with dead and wounded, the advancing masses stopped short and turned into a frantic mob, shouting, cursing, gesticulating. The order was given to charge. Then over the field rose the British cheer, mixed with the fierce yell of the Highland slogan. Some of the corps pushed forward with the bayonet ; some advanced firing. The clansmen drew their broadswords and dashed on, keen and swift as bloodhounds. At the English right,...
Side 438 - That we were wilfully or ignorantly deceived by our interpreter in regard to the word assassination I do aver, and will to my dying moment ; so will every officer that was present. The interpreter was a Dutchman little acquainted with the English tongue, therefore might not advert to the tone and meaning of the word in English ; but, whatever his motives for so doing, certain it is that he called it the death or the loss of the Sieur Jumonville. So we received and so we understood it, until, to our...

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