Eloquence of the United States, Volum 4

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E. & H. Clark, 1827
 

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Side 399 - It is not the intention of the court to say that no individual can be guilty of this crime who has not appeared in arms against his country. On the contrary, if war be actually levied, that is, if a body of men be actually assembled for the purpose of effecting by force a treasonable purpose, all those who perform any part, however minute or however remote from the scene of action, and who are actually leagued in the general conspiracy, are to be considered as traitors.
Side 294 - A crime, or misdemeanor, is an act committed or omitted in violation of a public law, either forbidding or commanding it.
Side 15 - The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign nations, is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connexion as possible. So far as we have already formed engagements, let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith. Here let us stop.
Side 410 - In a short time the whole man is changed, and every object of his former delight is relinquished. No more he enjoys the tranquil scene; it has become flat and insipid to his taste. His books are abandoned. His retort and crucible are thrown aside. His shrubbery blooms and breathes its fragrance upon the air in vain ; he like.~ it not. His ear no longer drinks the rich melody of music; it longs for the trumpet's clangor and the cannon's roar.
Side 198 - sit up late,' and ' eat the bread of carefulness...
Side 376 - The law of hi? master is, t; resist not evil ;" " if a man smite thee on one cheek, turn to him the other also.
Side 185 - And found no end, in wandering mazes lost Of good and evil much they argued then, Of happiness and final misery, Passion and apathy, and glory and shame, Vain wisdom all, and false philosophy: Yet with a pleasing sorcery could charm Pain for a while, or anguish, and excite Fallacious hope, or arm the obdured' breast With stubborn patience as with triple steel.
Side 103 - They have not made the appointment of the President to depend on any preexisting bodies of men, who might be tampered with beforehand to prostitute their votes; but they have referred it in the first instance to an immediate act of the People of America, to be exerted in the choice of persons for the temporary and sole purpose of making the appointment.
Side 474 - For the proof of this I need only refer to Vattel, one of the most correct and certainly not the least indulgent of modern professors of public law.
Side 79 - I look on the message of December, 1823, as forming a bright page in our history. I will help neither to erase it nor to tear it out ; nor shall it be by any act of mine blurred or blotted. It did honor to the sagacity of the Government, and I will not diminish that honor.

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