Observations, Anecdotes, and Characters, of Books and Men

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J. Murray, 1820 - 302 sider

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A collection of anecdotes, mostly collected from Spence's conversations with Pope, but including snippets from many others as well. Most deal with literature, writing, and impressions of ... Les hele vurderingen

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Side 133 - That's very strange ; but if you had not supped, I must have got something for you. Let me see, what should I have had ? A couple of lobsters ; ay, that would have done very well ; two shillings— tarts, a shilling ; but you will drink a glass of wine with me, though you supped so much before your usual time only to spare my pocket ?' ' No, we had rather talk with you than drink with you.
Side 108 - A little after Dryden went out; and in going, spoke to me again, and desired me to come and see him the next day. I was highly delighted with the invitation; went to see him accordingly : and was well acquainted with him after, as long as he lived.
Side 159 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the sea-shore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Side 83 - Shakspeare had just arrived, and the boy sent for from school to him, a head of one of the colleges (who was pretty well acquainted with the affairs of the family) met the child running home, and asked him, whither he was going in so much haste? The boy said, "•To my godfather, Shakspeare.
Side 148 - Snch a post as that, and such a wife as the Countess, do not seem to be, in prudence, eligible for a man that is asthmatic, and we may see the day when he will be heartily glad to resign them both.
Side 129 - Prior was not a right good man. He used to bury himself for whole days and nights together with a poor mean creature, and often drank hard.
Side 136 - OOOJJO some time; but afterwards thought it would be better to write a comedy on the same plan. This was what gave rise to the Beggar's Opera.
Side 10 - Addison, to let him know that I was not unacquainted with this behaviour of his; that if I was to speak severely of him in return for it, it should...
Side 8 - Iliad, because he had looked over Mr. Tickell's, but could wish to have the benefit of his observations on my second, which I had then finished, and which Mr. Tickell had not touched upon.
Side 30 - I was a great admirer of Ovid's Metamorphoses, and that was one of the chief reasons that set me upon the thoughts of stealing the Latin language. Mr. Wortley was the only person to whom I communicated my design, and he encouraged me in it. I used to study five or six hours a day for two years in my father's library ; and so got that language, whilst everybody else thought I was reading nothing but novels and romances.

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