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Public health nursing is one of the first of the latter courses that should be considered. There should be a public health nurse in every county, and the medical school should train the women for these positions. They should be apostles of health and expounders of medical knowledge in the homes and schools of the people, just as the county agricultural agents are the teachers of better agriculture and animal husbandry in the fields and stables.

The medical school, though located at Kansas City, might well offer popular courses at Lawrence and even at Manhattan for future teachers, for home economics students, indeed for any and all students. Funds should be available for extension work among both the doctors and the laity of the State. “The State-wide campus" is certainly the ideal of the modern State-supported medical school, as it is of the agricultural college or the school of education.

The University of Kansas might canvass the question of dental education; and if there is need, dentistry might be developed as part of the greater medical school. It is a mistake alike of State policy and of educational policy to have dentistry independent of medicine. This does not mean that every dentist should have the complete training of a physician, but it does mean that both professions are founded on the same sciences and should be taught in the same laboratories and clinics. The development of a unified out-patient department, including medicine, dentistry, and social service, might well be considered.

The University of Kansas has a good opportunity in medical education. It need not try to rival Johns Hopkins and Harvard Universities all at once. It needs time. It needs boosting instead of knocking, harmony instead of jealousy, cooperation instead of petty criticism. I believe the time is ripe for a big forward movement.

APPENDIX.

STATISTICAL TABLES.

Table 1. Per cent of the population 14 to 18 years of age in high schools, 1919-20.

2. Per cent of total school enrollment in high schools.
3. High-school attendance in Kansas, 1900-1901 to 1919-20.
4. Number and places of residence of college and professional students, and

number of inhabitants per student, by States (excluding independent

theological schools and teacher-training institutions), 1920-21. 5. The relation between appropriations for State institutions of higher learning

and population in various States. 6. Number of students registered in the various divisions of the university and

agricultural college for the years 1912–13 to 1921-22. 7. Number of students taking various majors in engineering at the university

and the agricultural college for the years 1912–13 to 1921–22. 8. Summary of enrollment in normal schools for the years 1917–18 to 1921-22. 9. Enrollment of resident students in normal schools for the year 1921-22. 10. Number of credit hours taken by students at the university and agricul

tural college for the year 1921-22. 11. Courses offered and courses given by departments, for the years 1920-21

and 1921-22. 12. Sizes of classes for the years 1920-21 and 1921-22. 13. Number of degrees granted by the university and agricultural college for

the years 1911-12 to 1920-21. 14. Vocations of graduates of the university and agricultural college for the years

1912 to 1921, inclusive. 15. Numbers of members of faculties, 1913 to 1922. 16. Enrollment and graduates in privately supported colleges and universities

in Kansas accredited by the State board of education for the year 1921-22. 17. Summary of enrollment and graduates in privately supported colleges and

universities in Kansas accredited by the State board of education for the

years 1917-18 to 1921–22. 18. Appropriations by the State legislature to the State educational institutions

for the years 1914 to 1923. 19. Condensed and consolidated statement of income and expenditures of the

university, agricultural college, and normal schools, for the year 1920-21. 20. Expenditures for agricultural and home economics extension for the years

1911-12 to 1920-21. 21. Comparative statement concerning correspondence and extension classes.

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Table 1.-Per cent of the population 14 to 18 years of age enrolled in high schools, 1919–20.

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TABLE 2.-Per cent of total school enrollment in high schools.

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TABLE 3.-High-school attendance in Kansas, 1900–1901 to 1919–20.

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Total.

Public.... Private.

Total.

16,479 16,573 18,550 20,452 20,857

20,995

21,643 22,493

24,977

1909-10 1910-11 1911-12 1912-13 1913-14 1914-15 1915-16 1917-18 1919-20

57,528 2,582

26,278 27,594 31,296 34,600 37,653 38,318 41,011 | 54,823

543 992 1, 126 1,514 1,779 1,663 1,569 1,954 26,821 28,586 32, 422 36,114 39, 432 39,981 42,580 56,777

60,110

The number of high-school graduates during the years 1918-19 and 1919-20 was, respectively, 8,716 and 7,833. TABLE 4.-Number and places of residence of college and professional students, and number of inhabitants per student, by States (excluding independent theological schools and teacher training institutions), 1920–21.

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TABLE 5.Relation between appropriations for State institutions of higher learning and

population in various States, 1919–20.

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1 Nevada.. 2 Utah.. 3 Oregon. 4 Arizona. 5 Washington. 6 Montana. 17 | Idaho. 8 North Dakota.. 9 Nebraska. 10 Colorado.. 11 Minnesota. 12 South Dakota.. 13 KANSAS. 14 Iowa.. 15 Wisconsin 16 Oklahoma. 17 Michigan. 18 California. 19 Wyoming 20 New Mexico. 21 Texas. 22 West Virginia.. 23 Hawaii. 24 Connecticut. 25 New Hampshire.

$241, 708 77, 407 $3.12
1, 239, 445 449, 396 2. 75
1,873, 914 783, 389

2. 39
874, 423
334, 162

2.31
2, 461, 701 | 1,356, 621 1.81
876, 501
548, 889

1. 59
673, 697 431, 866

1.58 1,016, 443 646, 872

1.57 2,022, 100 | 1, 296, 372 1.55 1,436, 958

939, 629 1.52 3,533, 436 2,387, 125 1.48 1,040, 323

636, 547

1.47 2, 499, 103 1,769, 257 1.41 3, 247, 233 2,404, 021

1.35 3, 186, 143 2,632, 067 1, 21 2, 287, 412 2,028, 283 1.14 4, 107, 723 3,668, 412 1. 12 3,748,750 3, 426, 861 1.09

203, 858 194, 202

379, 629 360, 350 1.04
3,341, 546 4,663, 228 .72
1,042,387 1,463, 701 .71

173, 947 255, 912 .68
928, 176 1,380, 631 .67
274, 173 443, 083

Indiana...
27 Illinois.
28 South Carolina.
29 Mississippi.
29 Maine.
30 Virginia.
31 Massachusetts.
32 Ohio...
33 Delaware.
34 North Carolina..
35 Florida,
36 Rhode Island..
37 Vermont.
38 Tennessee.
39 Missouri.
40 Georgia..
41 New Jersey.
42 Maryland.
42 Alabama.
43 New York.
43 Kentucky.
44 Arkansas.
45 Louisiana.

Pennsylvania.
46 Porto Rico.

$1,833, 566 2,930, 390 $0.62 3,737, 976 6,485, 280 . 57

922, 565 1,683, 724 54 867, 260 1,790, 618 48 358, 907 768, 014 48 1,094, 225 2,309, 187 47 1,665, 630 3,852, 356 45 2,580, 409 5,759, 394

94, 045 223,003 . 42 978, 545 2,559, 123 . 38 350, 710 968, 470 . 36 211, 924 604, 397 35 128, 419 352, 428 699, 381 2,337, 885 29 913, 297 3,404, 055 . 27 765, 418 2,895, 832 . 26 735, 653 3, 155, 900 23 320, 026 1,449, 661 .22

532, 330 2,348, 174 .22 3,074, 625 10,385, 227 . 21

712, 722 2,416, 630 .21 334, 087 1,752, 204 .18

308, 042 1,798, 509 . 17 1, 529, 257 8,720, 017 17 145, 921

1, 297,772 . 11

. 33

1.05

45

.63

1 Including normal schools.

TABLE 6.-Number of students registered in various divisions for the years 1912–13 to

1921–22.

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Graduate...
Arts and science.
Education.
Engineering.
Fine arts.
Law..
Medicine.
Pharmacy.
Summer school.

Total, excluding dupli

cates.

119 127 143 151 137 87 110 120 118 158 1,287 1,466 1,656 1,713 1,927 1,605 2,012 2,447 2,617 2,648

262 167 236 322 333 316 262 337 355 391
393 399 443 423 496 399 1,070 742 738 714
161 163 197 184 252 225 243 396 406 437
215 185 177 171 120 112 87 202 250 265
129
135 136

170 159 161 155 176 78 65 70 60

59
42 36 66

83
468 510 562 569 817 748

762

710 924 1,309

89

145

99

2,546 2,637 2,812 2,959 3,437 2,840 3,916 4,011 | 4,226 4,667

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Total, excluding dupli

cates...

2,928 3,027 3,089 3,314 3,339 2, 406 2,991 3,376 3,395 3,547

Federal Board for Vocational Education students not classified as to divisions in 1920.

TABLE 7.—Number of students taking various majors in engineering.

A. UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS.

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1 Does not include freshmen and sophomores.

2 Including specials and short course.

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