Selections from the Dispatches and General Orders of Field Marshall the Duke of Wellington

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Side 675 - Peninsula; and would eventually prove highly injurious to the public interests. " 6. The rules, therefore, which have been observed hitherto, in requiring, and taking, and giving receipts for supplies from the country, are to be continued in the villages on the French frontier; and the commissaries, attached to each of the armies of the several nations, will receive the orders from the commander in chief of the army of their nations, respecting the mode and period of paying for such supplies.
Side 147 - I would sacrifice Gwalior, or every frontier of India, ten times over, in order to preserve our credit for scrupulous good faith...
Side 569 - It is occasioned entirely by the trick our officers of cavalry have acquired of galloping at every thing, and their galloping back as fast as they gallop on the enemy. They never consider their situation, never think of manoeuvring before an enemy — so little that one would think they cannot mano3uvre, excepting on Wimbledon Common ; and when they use their arm as it ought to be used, viz., offensively, they never keep nor provide for a reserve.
Side 195 - I believe, so far advanced as we should and ought to have been on the night of the 21st. I assure you, my dear Lord, matters are not prospering here ; and I feel an earnest desire to quit the army. I have been too successful with this army ever to serve with it in a subordinate situation with satisfaction to the person who shall command it, and, of course, not to myself. However, I shall do whatever the Government may wish.
Side 611 - We must look, therefore, for the existing evils, and for the situation in which we now find the army, to some causes besides those resulting from the operations in which we have been engaged.
Side 429 - A retreat in the face of such an enemy, already within reach of the easy communication by the sea-beach, must have involved the whole allied army in all, the danger of being attacked during the unavoidable confusion of the different corps arriving on the narrow ridge of Bermesa nearly at the same time.
Side 579 - Tormes, we came up with the enemy's rear of cavalry and infantry near La Serna. They were immediately attacked by the two brigades of dragoons, and the cavalry fled, leaving the infantry to their fate. I have never witnessed a more gallant charge than was made on the enemy's infantry by the heavy brigade of the King's German Legion, under Major-General Bock, which was completely successful ; and the whole body of infantry, consisting of three battalions of the enemy's 1st division, were made prisoners.
Side 85 - British cavalry, charged one large body of infantry, which had retired and was formed again, in which operation he was killed ; and some time elapsed before we could put an end to the straggling fire, which was kept up by individuals from the guns from which the enemy were driven. The enemy's cavalry also, which had been hovering round us throughout the action, were still near us. At length, when the last formed body of infantry gave way, the whole went off, and left in our hands ninety pieces of...
Side 245 - We all know that the discipline and regularity of all armies must depend upon the diligence of the regimental officers, particularly the subalterns. I may order what I please ; but if they do not execute what I order, or if they execute it with negligence, I cannot expect that British soldiers will be orderly or regular.
Side 542 - French corps d'armee which has not a battalion of sappers and a company of miners. But we are obliged to depend for assistance of this description upon the regiments of the line ; and although the men are brave and willing, they want the knowledge and training which are necessary. Many casualties among them consequently occur, and much valuable time is lost at the most critical period of the siege.

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