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favors use of general expressions in constitution, 53; champions
state rights, 61, note; declares legal tender notes unconstitu-

tional, 125, note 3.
Military academy, West Point, 168, note.
Military affairs, 164, 192.
Militia, 169, 230, 287, note 2.
Minority representation (in Illinois), 269, note.
Monroe, James, on internal improvements, 150, note 3.
Mormonism, 226, note 2.
Morris, Gouverneur, favors ratification of constitution, 27.
Municipal corporations, 324.
National debt, statistics of, 126, note 2.
Naturalization, 149.
National banks, 122.
National sovereignty, 50.
National lands, survey and sale of, 179, note.
National conventions, 87.
Navigation laws, 231.
Naval academy, Annapolis, 163, note.
Navy department, organization and work of, 95, note.
New England league of 1643, 4.
New states, admission of, 33, 76, note 2.
New York and Virginia delay ratifying constitution, 24.
New York congress of 1765, 5.
Nobility, titles of, 225, note 4.
Nomination of candidates for president, 87.
Non-coercion theory, 41.
Non-interference theory, 280.
Normal schools, 310.
Office, tenure of, 61.
Organization of federal government, 66.
Paper money in the United States, history of, 126, note 2.
Parliamentary government, 92, 191, note.
Parliamentary government in the states, 289.
Pardons, 210.
Patents, 151.
People vs. population, 47.
Petition, right of, 230.
Philadelphia congress of 1774, 5.
Philadelphia congress of 1775, 6.
Philadelphia convention of 1787, 16, 43.
Police powers of the states, 142.

Polk, J. K., consults senate before making treaty, 201, note.
Population and area, statistics of, 34.
Population vs. people, 47.
Powers of federal government, 53.
Postoffice department, organization and work of, 95, note.
Practice and pleading in federal courts, 221.
Preamble to the constitution, 37.
President, has all the executive power, 82; election of, 85; his salary,

106; his inaugural address, 115; his general powers, 190; military
powers, 192; war-powers, 194; cannot suspend habeas corpus,
196; powers as to foreign relations, 199; treaty-power, 200; ap-

pointment of officials, 206; pardoning power, 210.
Presidential election of 1876, 86.

electors, 85.

messages, 114.
" proclamations, 115.
Private property, taking for public use, 253; dedication to public

uses, 254.
Public debt, 117.
Public use of private property, 254.
Public works (state), 284.
Railroads, 145, note 2, 255.
Ratification of constitution, 24.
Re-admission of states, 31, note, 47, 188, note.
Real estate owned by United States, 174.
Reconstruction, 47, 240.
Reform, civil service, 106, note, 208, 256, 275, 290.
Regulation of commerce, 136.
Religious liberty, 225.
Removal of causes, 216, note 2.
Republican form of government, guarantee of, 236.
Resulting powers, 116.
Revenue, federal, statistics of, 121, note 2, 135.
Searches, 257.
Schools, normal, 310.
Schools, public, 304.
Schurz, Carl, his Indian policy, 136, note 3.
Secession, duty of preventing it by force, 45.

ordinances of, null and void, 46.
" theory of, 41.
Seizures, 257.
Senators, election of, 77; legislatures cannot instruct them, 78.

Seward, W. H., his views on initiative of the house in making ap-

propriations, 132; denies congressional jurisdiction of foreign
affairs, 199; as governor of New York refuses request for extra-

dition, 245.
Silver demonetized, 124, note.
Slavery, 18, 19, 175, 230.
Social-political legislation, 283.
Sovereignty of United States, 50.
Special legislation (state), 275.
State department, organization and work of, 95, note.
State courts, 291.

" debts, 279.

“ sovereignty, 39, 157.
States, the, readmission of, 31, note, 47, 188, note; their police

powers, 142; admisssion to the Union, 185; controversies be-
tween them, 219; cannot be sued, 220; their citizenship, 248;
constituent parts of their constitutions, 267; their legislative pow-
ers, 268; implied restrictions upon them, 271; their legislative
methods, 272; special legislation, 275; social-political legislation,
283; impeachment, 285; the executive power, 285; the governor,
286; the cabinet, 288; parliamentary government, 289; courts,
291; amendment of constitutions, 292; taxes in general, 296;
capitation tax, 299; income tax, 301: license and business taxes,

302.
Statistics of population and area, 34; of imports, 121, note 2; of fed-

eral revenue, 121, note 2, 135; of the national debt, 126, note 2;

of appropriations, 135; of land-grants, 276, note.
Stephens, A. H., opposes secession, 157.
Supreme court, packed to reverse legal tender cases, 62, note; its de-

cisions on constitutional questions, 63; limits of its jurisdiction,

66, note; its stability, 69; cannot compel extradition, 246.
System of checks and balances, 60.
Taxation, 117.

“ direct, 73, note 2.

06 (state), 296, 299, 301, 302,
Territories, 175.
Territorial courts, 98, note.

" government, 184, note.
Test-oath cases, 224, note.
Texas, 190.
Telegraphs, 145, note 2.
Tenure of office, 69.

Tenure of office act, 93, note.
Titles of nobility, 225, note 4.
Tilden, S. J., his claims to the presidency, 90..
Town officers, 328.
Townships, 327.
Trade, regulation of, 136.
Trade-marks, 153.
Treason, 154.
Treasury department, organization and work of, 95, note.
Treaty-power, 200.
Tyler, John, 83.
Universities and colleges, 312.
Vacancies in presidential office, 83, note.
Veto, 113.
Vice-president, his functions, 82; election of, 85.
Virginia and Kentucky resolutions, 40, note 2.
Virginia and New York delay ratifying constitution, 24.
War department, organization and work of, 95, note.
War powers, 194.
Warrants, 258.
Washington, George, on convention of 1787, 16; on ratification of the

constitution, 27; his farewell address, 115, note 1; consults senate

before making treaty, 201, note 1.
Webster, Daniel, on the territories, 183; on commercial treaties, 204.
Weights and measures, 150.
West Point military academy, 168, note.

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