Oratory and Orators

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S.C. Griggs, 1878 - 448 sider
 

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Side 385 - I happened soon after to attend one of his sermons, in the course of which I perceived he intended to finish with a collection, and I silently resolved he should get nothing from me. I had in my pocket a handful of copper money, three or four silver dollars, and five pistoles in gold. As he proceeded I began to soften and concluded to give the copper.
Side 264 - But how much nobler will be the Sovereign's boast, when he shall have it to say that he found Law dear, and left it cheap ; found it a sealed book, left it a living letter ; found it the patrimony of the rich, left it the inheritance of the poor ; found it the two-edged sword of craft and oppression, left it the staff of Honesty and the shield of Innocence...
Side 21 - His peculiar phrases had that force of description that the original scene appeared to be, at that moment, acting before our eyes. We saw the very faces of the Jews: the staring, frightful distortions of malice and rage. We saw the buffet; my soul kindled with a flame of indignation; and my hands were involuntarily and convulsively clinched.
Side 159 - Treason, treason!" echoed from every part of the house. Henry faltered not for an instant, but, taking a loftier attitude, and fixing on the speaker an eye of fire, he added " may profit by their example. If this be treason, make the most of it...
Side 259 - You well know, gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness, — how soon, upon any call of patriotism, or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion — how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage — how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder.
Side 284 - Was this then the fate of that high-gifted man, " The pride of the palace, the bower and the hall, " The orator, — dramatist, — minstrel, — who ran " Through each mode of the lyre, and was master of all...
Side 238 - Tis liberty to liberty engaged," that they will defend themselves, their families, and their country. In this great cause they are immovably allied ; it is the alliance of God and nature — immutable, eternal — fixed as the firmament of heaven.
Side 266 - There is a law above all the enactments of human codes ; the same throughout the world, the same in all times — such as it was...
Side 17 - Monsieur, tell those who sent you that we are here by the will of the People, and that nothing but the force of bayonets...
Side 287 - But let us not too much grieve, that you have met the common fate of men. You lived at least long enough to know that your work had been nobly and successfully accomplished. You lived to see your country's independence established, and to sheathe your swords from war.

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