Studies in the History of Modern Education

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Silver, Burdett, 1908 - 223 sider
 

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Side 69 - The whole education of women ought to be relative to men. To please them, to be useful to them, to make themselves loved and honored by them, to educate them when young, to care for them when grown, to counsel them, to console them, and to make life sweet and agreeable to them — these are the duties of women at all times and what should be taught them from their infancy.
Side 138 - This all-controlling law is necessarily based on an all-pervading, energetic, living, selfconscious, and hence eternal, Unity. . . . This Unity is God. All things have come from the Divine Unity, from God, and have their origin in the Divine Unity, in God alone. God is the sole source of all things.
Side 155 - Board, collect information of the actual condition and efficiency of the Common Schools, and other means of popular education, and diffuse as widely as possible throughout every part of the Commonwealth, information of the most approved and successful methods of arranging the studies, and conducting the education of the young, to the end that all children in this Commonwealth, who depend upon Common Schools for instruction, may have the best education which those schools can be made to impart.
Side 68 - ... upon it. Whether my pupil be destined for the army, the church, or the bar, matters little to me. Before he can think of adopting the vocation of his parents, nature calls upon him to be a man. How to live is the business I wish to teach him. On leaving my hands he will not, I admit, be a magistrate, a soldier, or a priest ; first of all he will be a man.
Side 67 - Everything is good as it comes from the hands of the Author of Nature; but everything degenerates in the hands of man.
Side 86 - Teaching must follow the path of development, and not that of dogmatic exposition, 7. " The individuality of the pupil must be sacred for the teacher. 8. " The chief aim of elementary instruction is not to furnish the child with knowledge and talents, but to develop and increase the powers of his mind.
Side 92 - Oh! if men would only comprehend that the aim of all instruction is, and can be, nothing but the development of human nature, by the harmonious cultivation of its powers and talents, and the promotion of manliness of life.
Side 143 - To give firmness to the will, to quicken it, and to (make it pure, strong, and enduring, in a life of pure humanity, is the chief concern, the main object in the guidance of the boy, in instruction and the school.
Side 169 - Teaching is the most difficult of all arts, and the profoundest, of all sciences. In its absolute perfection, it would involve a complete knowledge of the whole being to be taught, and of the precise manner in which every possible application would affect it...
Side 139 - Education consists in leading man, as a thinking, intelligent being, growing into selfconsciousness, to a pure and unsullied, conscious and free representation of the inner law of Divine Unity, and in teaching him ways and means thereto.

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