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stance, that plan has not been attended with any matérial inconvenience. The fortune of the expeditions, depending during the ne

otiation of the peace, was not, #. the mutual consent of parties, to have any influence on the terms of it. The places taken were to be reciprocally restored. We, therefore, thought it more pri. dent to present to the reader anarrative of that important transaction, entire and unbroken, rather than i. any part of it, until we

ad gathered in all the scattered events of the war. However, there were events, and some of them so confiderable, to the knowledge of which we have arrived since the conclusion of our last year's labour, that they ou ht by no means to be omitted. They will furnish some.." to the entertainment we propose for the public in the o, and they are such, as not unworthily close that great scene of national glory, which Great Britain had displayed to the world, during the five last campaigns. The chief of these was the expedition against 1he Manilas. Its importance will

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improved to the best advantage. The spirit of commerce is not powerful in that people. The trade of the Philippines is thought to have declined: its great branch is now reduced to two ships, which annually pass between these islands and Acapulco in America, and to

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N the close of our last volume, we became apprehensive of a deficiency of materials towards furnishing an history of the succeeding years. The peace seemed to be so well settled, that one might imagine, there could be little room for political disputes amongst the several powers, and none at all for actual war and hostility. In reality, Europe may be said to be perfeótly quiet: but the extent of the commercial empire of Great Britain is such, and it engages her in such a vast variety of difficult conneétions, that it is almost impossible for any considerable length of time to pass over, without producing abundance of events of a very interesting nature; and we heartily wish we could flatter ourselves, that we should be found as equal to our materials of history, as we are likely to be well supplied with them. The savage war, which has unfortunately broke out in America since the conclusion of the general peace, has been fruitful of events; and it is not yet ended. Since then, troubles of great consequence have likewise arisen in the East Indies, which threaten to afford us Vol. VI. [B] but

ginally inhabited, or came as adVenturers, or were brought as slaves, *tuo their extensive dominions. From this short account it is visible, that the acquisition of such a place must have proved of very great advantage towards carrying on the war with Spain effectually, and could not, therefore, fail of having an advantageous, influence on the terms of pacification. Accordingly it was resolved to make an attempt upon the Manilas, from a plan of operations delivered to the ministry by colonel Draper; and, perhaps, the reader will be glad to know how this plan came to be formed. After the memorable defence of Madrass in 1759, colonel Draper's bad flate of health obliged him to leave that country. He embarked, in company with the honourable capt. owe, then commander of the Winchelsea, for Canton in China, a city with which the inhabitants of Manila carry on a confiderable trade. Here they wisely spent that time of relaxation from military operations, in attaining such knowledge of the Philippine islands, as might afterwards be serviceable to their country, giving a lesson to all men in public cmployment, that, at times when they cannot perform an active service, they may still do a material one by wise attention and fensible observation. They dis. covered, that the Spaniards of the Philippine islands, confiding in their remote distance from Europe, fupposed an attack upon them inpracticable, and were by that fatal security, which is always the consequence of an ill-founded confidence, lulled into a total inattention, to a regular military strength. Upon the first rumour of a war

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put they were soon obviated. Nothing was demanded but a light frigate to carry colonel Draper to Madrass, where alone suitable prearations could be made for this important enterprise. . . . The colonel arrived at Madrass the latter end of June, 1762, and on his arrival was appoint. ed brigadier general and commander in chief of the expedition, which was to be undertaken folely by the troops and squadron then in India. No doubt, as we were ...;arbiters of the peninsula of India, by the #.. of the o and by the humiliation of the Dutch, this attempt became more feasible. However, as this dominion was new, and rather entered upon, than firmly established, something was to be dreaded even from the natives ; and, therefore, from this

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