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the city and sanctuary fhall be deftroyed. We might add, that, A regular plan of mufic. according to that most probable punctuation, which the ancient PSALMODY, called cant us Greek interpreters followed DY planus, confifts of five tones, by, that the Messiah himself, cut and two half tones, which are the oft, shall destroy the city and sanc- foundation of all sorts of mufic: Cuary, with the prince that shall but by a more regular division is come. As Matt. xxii. ver. 7. should be said there are fix notes, “ He fent forth his armies, and of which not only one, but all destroyed those murtherers." From may be divided into half notes, these four particulars it plainly ap- quarter notes, demi-quarters, and pears, that the modern Jews who so on, further than any mortal ear expect a Messiah ftill to come, are can apprehend. Sound being digrossiy mistaken in the notion of visible ad infinitum in the fame the Messiah, as were also their manner as space. fore-fathers, who caused Jesus to

This division of musical sounds, be crucified, and, by that ineans, has an analogy or relation with that ignorantly fulfilled what the

pro

of colours, of which there are fix phets had foretold concerning him, sorts; white, red, yellow, green, * that he should fuffer, and so blue, and black. Some indeed enter into his glory.”

divide the colours into seven; The notion which the modern the seventh they call purple; Jews have. is this : first, that he but I can't perceive it is Otherwise Ihall be a pure man, descending than a mixture more splendid than from the seed of David. Secondly, brown, grey, and the other mixed that he is promised to the Jews colours. Black is said to be a only, and not to the gentiles, mere negation of calour, but as it That he shall come in the time of makes an impression on the imagithe captivity, after the Roman nation, I overlook the subtilty in empire is expired. That he fail this comparison, and suppose it a fet up a terrestrial monarchy over colour, the whole world, and the benefits By dividing the mufical notes which he shall bring to the Jews into fix, as nature directs, the unia fall be only corporal. That Mej- found will fall on the seventh note, fias Davidicus non occidetur. That and should, for this reason, be Meflias, who comes of the line of called a feptime, and not an octave, David, shall not be slain : but shall a name occafioned by the two half conquer and subdue all nations, notes. Music is generally fupand make them subject to him, and posed to confift of three parts ; then he shall suffer them to live in treble, tenor, and bass. But that peace and quiet, who embrace the the twenty-four letters of the al., Jewish religion, and continue in phabet may find employment in the vaffalage and subjection to the scheme of music I am propofing, I Jews under him.

fall divide it into four parts, which are the double treble, the treble, the tenor, and the bass, fıx 10tes to each part. The double

treble

treble is hardly practicable : how- tions. The a should be pronounced ever the fix vowels a, e, i, o, u, full, and not as an e; the e should y, are to denote it; the a being likewise be pronounced plain, and the highest note of all. · The fix not as the French i, which found aspirations, h, y confonant, j, f, fhould remain with the taid letter w, o, are to denote the treble. i, and not partake of the pronun The fix liquids r, I, v, 2, 1, m, ciation of the Greek dipthong oi, are to denote the tenor; and the or ei; the o should not be profix mutes, k; &, d, t, b, P, are nounced like the dipthong ao as in to denote the bass. Thus,, a, by the word nod, but naturally, as in r, k, are unisounds; e, cs 1, g, the very word, word; the u should the fame; the c in composition de- be pronounced as by the Italians, notes the y consonant, as I shall and as ou is pronounced by the explain just now; i, j, s, d, are Englifh in the word you ; the y likewise unisounds to f, x, t, alike; vowel should be pronounced as u v, w, n, b, in the like manner in the word pure; the_u is always jov, m, P are also unifounds. pronouuced lo by the French; the This is describing music according y was anciently pronounced so by to the rules of nature; thereby a the Greeks, though it differs not tune may be easily penned from as to found in the vulgar alphabets the finger's voice, or the founding from an i. of the instrument, which would The consonants should be probe very commodious.

nounced in the following manner. Half tones may be denoted by with an a or any other vowel, ha, the figures that denote a half in ya, ja, fa, we, va; these are all calculation, or some briefer cha- aspirations, and are the notes of racter, such as a dot added to the treble: the c in practice is to the letter. Semibreves, minims, take the place of the y consonant, crotchets, quavers, femiquavers, de- because there is no particular chamiquavers, and their rests ; times, racter of the y confonant in any repeats, tyings, divisions of the alphabet I know of, unless it be trains, tarps, flats, naturals, the aleph or ajin of the Hebrew : hould also be signified by cha- and because there is no occasion racters, that may be quickly pen- for it otherwise; for it differs not ned, fuch as commas, points, dots in found from the for the k, being variously situated in respect to the fometimes pronounced as oite, and letter, that is, the note they belong fometimes as the other; the q is to.. Ofall which a sort of horn-book not a different letter from the k. should be made, the composition The fix liquids and the six mutes of which I recommend to a judici- are to be called thus, ra, la, la, oas mafter, that the reading of mu za, na, ma, these are the notes of fic, fo requifite to allay forrow, the tenor ; and ka, ga, da, ta, ba, and to complete joy, may be more pa, these are the notes of the bafs. general than it is at present. A liquid is a letter, that has an

The letters considered as notes imperfect found independent of a of music should be pronounced ac- vowel, for which reason the sand cording to the dictates of nature, z are of that number, though not and not according to valgar no- generally regarded as such. Any VOL. VI.

other

stile, kept ever in subferviency to me confiderably better than a se the facred poetry, ought to be fidence in town; and I find a greataimed at as the truest and the on er fhare of satisfaction at the botly praise. The same devout fim- tom of your little garden, than plicity of manners may be attained ever I experienced in the bafle of in the performance, and ought to a court. Poflibly this may probe ftudied by the organist and ceed from a proper estimation of choir : their ambition thould lic your worth, and a juft opinion of in a natural and dignified execu- all the ambitious coronets, or fawo. tion, not in a curious display of ing sycophants I am surrounded art. The maxim of Augustine was with. Certain it is, however, excellent, and deserves the serious the dignity of human nature ledattention both of those who per- fens in my notion of things, accordform and those who hear ; « I ing to the knowledge I have of always think myself blameable, mankind; and the more intimate when I am drawn more to the I become with the generality of finger than to what is fung.” But people, the greater occafion I have an additional circumstance seems to despise them.--The felon at the necessary, as a means of bringing bar, and the judge upon the beach, back church music to its original are stimulated by the same motives, dignity and use : we have seen in though they act in different capathe course of this differtation, how cities; for the one but plunders the feparations follow each other through a hope of gain and let in the decline of the poetic and ine ak if the other would take any musical arts.

pains in the administration of julAnd for the sake of the truth, tice without a reasonable gratuiwe must here observe, that in the ty for his labour. performance of cathedral mufic, a This you will say may be carleparation hath long taken place, rying things too far, and posibly fatal to its trueft utility. The it may be fo-yet, though a par. higher ranks of the church do not ticular instance or two may be think themselves concerned in the brought to contradict an observaperformance. It were devoutlytion of this kind, they can by no to be wished that the musical edu- means be produced as arguments cation were so general as to enable against the universal depravity. I the clergy, of whatever rank, to am greatly pleased with a remark join the choir in the celebration of which Swift made a few days ago their Creator, in all its appointed in a conversation which we had forms: the laity would be natu upon this very fubject; I need not rally led to follow fo powerful an tell you how four the dean is in his example.

fentiments of the world ; but I

think the following declaration is An original letter from lord Boling- not more diftinguithed for its se

broke to Mr. Pope, on the univer- verity, than supported by its julJal depravity of mankind ; and the tice, " Werewe, said he, to poetry of Addison

make a nice, examination into the Dear Pope, ,

adions of every man, we should I Do not know how it is, but the find one half of the world

to be air of Twickenham agrees with

rogues,

rogues, and the other half to be there is a heaviness about his verÈ blockheads; the latter half may be sification, which is totally incon

divided into two claffes, the good- fiftent with elegance and spirit, natured blockhead and the fenfi- and which, though it may in the ble; the one, through an easiness, thoughts of fome people carry

of temper, is always liable to be much judgmeut, is in my opinion : ill-used; the other, through an ex a proof of very little genius. I am

cefs of vanity, is frequently ex- far, you know, from being fond of posed to be wretched. Mutual eternal epithets in poetry, or endconfidence and real friendship are less endeavours at fublimity of exvery pretty words, but feldom car- prestion ; but I would have it ex. ry ary meaning ; no man will en- alted a little above prose in the tortain an opinion of another, moft humble species, and carry which is opposite to his own in an air of some dignity and imterest; anda nod from a great man, portance. or a smile from a strumpet, will

Trivial as the remark may ap. fet a couple of blockheads by the pear, it was very well for a boy of

ears, who a moment before would fourteen, who was reading Cato, E have ventured their lives for each and coming to that tag which is so other's reputation.”

highly celebrated by some of the Lord Peterborough dined with author's friends ; me yesterday, I have a highi dea So the pure limpid stream of the goodness of this nobleman's when foul with stains ;" heart, ihough it may be brought as the lad burit into a fit of laughing, a proof againit my favourite fyf- and cried, Here is a bull! who tem ; but he is of a turn so excef- ever thought that a tream could fively romantic, that I cannot be be pure and limpid, yet at the equally prejudiced in favour of his fame time foal with ftains ? I could understanding. I have no notion not help joining the langh at the of a man's perpetually expofing archness of the boy's observation, himself to unnecessary dangers for tho’ the criticism might seem too the mere fake of being talked of; low for judgments of more expeor, through a ridiculous thirst for rience and maturity.- But why do military glory, venturing a life I entertain a fellow of your abiliwhich should be preserved for the ties in this manner, who are so service of his prince, and the in- greatly a fuperior master of the terest of his country. My motive lubject. I am somehow fond of for saying this you know is neither fcribling, and become trifling for founded upon pique, nor directed the sake of spinning out a letter. by ill-nature.

My lord is a man If possible, I shall take an airing for whom I have the most perfect down your way on Saturday, and regard, and my esteem alone is pray let me have a little leg of the reason why I may be fo ex- lamb, with some spinnage and plain tremely sensible of his errors. butter, to regale on.' Where I

I saw Addison this morning- dine in town they starve me with Somehowor other, Pope, I can by no luxury; and I have sat at many a means think that man an excellent table where I had not a bit of any poet; his prose is very well--but thing to eat, because I had too

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ftile, lept ever in fubferviency to me confiderably better than a re the facred poetry, ought to be fidence in town; and I find a greataimed at as the truest and the on er fhare of satisfaction at the botly praise. The same devout fim- tom of your little garden, than plicity of manners may be attained ever I experienced in the bustle of in the performance, and ought to a court. Poflibly this may probe studied by the organist and ceed from a proper estimation of choir : their ambition fhould lic your worth, and a juft opinion of in a natural and dignified execu

all the ambitious coronets, or fawntion, not in a curious display of ing, fycophants I am surrounded art. The maxim of Augustine was with. Certain it is, however, excellent, and deserves the serious the dignity of human nature lelattention both of those who per- fens in my notion of things, accordform and those who hear ; * I ing to the knowledge I have of always think myself blameable, mankind; and the more intimate when I drawn more to the I become with the generality of Inger than to what is sung.". But people, the greater occafion I have an additional circumstance feems to despise them.-The felon at the necessary, as a means of bringing bar, and the judge upon the bench, back church music to its original are stimulated by the fame motives, dignity and use : we have feen in though they act in different capathe course of this differtation, how cities; for the one but plunders the feparations follow each other through a hope of gain ; and let in the decline of the poetic and me ak if the other would take any musical arts.

pains in the administration of jufAnd for the sake of the truth, tice without a reasonable gratuiwe must here obferve, that in the ty for his labour. performance of cathedral mufic, a This you will say may be carfeparation hath long taken place, rying things too far, and posibly fatal to its trueft utility. The it may be fo-yet, though a parhigher ranks of the church do not ticular instance or two may be think themselves concerned in the brought to contradict an observaperformance. It were devoutly tion of this kind, they can by no to be withed that the musical edu means be produced as arguments cation were fo general as to enable against the universal depravity. the clergy, of whatever rànk, to am greatly pleased with a remark join the choir in the celebration of which Swift made a few days ago

their Creator, in all its appointed in a conversation which we had forms: the laity would be natu

upon this very fabject; I need not rally led to follow so powerful an tell you how four the dean is in his example.

sentiments of the world ; but I An original terter from ford Boling- not more diftinguished for its fe

think the following declaration is broke to Mr. Pope

, on the univer- verity, than supported by its ju. fal deprauity of mankind; and the tice,

“ Were we, faid he, to poetry of Addison

make a nice, examination into the Do not know how it'is, but the find one half of the world to be

actions of every man, we should I!

air of Twickenham agrees with

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tid. Dear Pope,

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rogues,

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