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and diffolutions, I am not afraid Colonel Birch.) I am heartily of it now, and I hope no man sorry this has happened. This is else here is afraid of it. I would an unlucky stumble at the threshold, not give the kiog offence, but not before we get into the house. I part with one hair of our right. came hither with an intention (God If you will not ftand to it here, you is my witness) to make this « will have a great many things put · healing parliament.'. I have alupon you. I am fatisfied that we ways heard here, that it is the uncould not fix upon a fitter perfon doubted right of this house to chuse for fpeaker than Mr. Seymour; he their speaker, &c. I have ccalon to is a privy counsellor, treasurer of believe Mr. Seymour very proper of the navy, and has done the king for the employment, and that he very good service here, which would be acceptable to his mamakes me wonder he should not jesty; but he that did this with be approved of by the king. I the king may do'more. I would thought we could not have oblig- adjourn till to-morrow, and make ed the king more. The king faid, a representation of our right to -6. He would have no favourite but the king. - his people.'-And thus to have Mr. Powle.) This gives me apour speaker rejected, what will you prehension that there is some perthink of it! Pray, gentlemen, let lon too near the king, who is afraid us fleep upon it, and let the clerk of this parliament, I have obput the question for adjourning till served that, of late, thofe things of co-morrow.

the greatest momentare done with• Sir Thomas Lee.] I see it is the out any council at all; done in a univerfal opinion to adjourn, &c. corner. As for the prorogation therefore I shall say but a little. and diffolution of the last parliaThe last parliament, a little before ment, there was not one word of the prorogation, information was the advice of the privy council in given the house of the danger of it. I fear no advice was asked, the king's person, and the house bot given for fupporting the deaddressed the king, · To have a figns of private men. I have ever • care of his person, &c.' The an- taken the record to be, that no fwer was,

• The king was then man was ever refused being fpeak• busy, but we should have an er when presented to the king, but • account of our message;' but for for fome disability: of body; as three weeks we heard nothing, and in Sir John Popham's case, who we were prorogued. I take no defired to be excufed from that tice only how things grow by de- service by reason of disability of grees, We came up to this par- body from wounds he received in liainent with great joy, and expec the wars, 28 Hen. VI. And latetation of doing good, and now we ly Sir Job Charlton, not being are thus interrupted! This being able to endure the employment, by our condition, and we having pre-- reason of disability of bodyRut cedents plain in the case for us, I nothing of this can be objected would adjourn till to-morrow, and against Mr. Seymour. Muft any then make a representation of the private person inform the king of thing to the king.

his unfiineis, &c. without any

caus

Seymour in the chancellor's speech. without a speaker, nor was their But if it be proved that the king having a speaker originally from has always granted, and never de- the crown, but by the commonsnied the choice, I suppose the Till Hen. IV's time, not one prething will be given up. There is cedent of presenting a speaker, &c. but one precedent of the king's The chancellor tells us,

that the denial, and that was in the case of " king's favour may not turn to Thorp. It is strange that this • his prejudice, &c. This being house must be made a second. I put to a question of right, we see many worthy faces that were must stand upon our right. There not here the laft parliament: and is no reason from the electors or therefore, I all say, it is very the elected, why he should be rehard, there having, for an hun- jected; therefore I adhere to Mr. dred years together, never been so Seymour. much as one excuse made by a Sir Thomas Clarges. I desire Speaker chosen by the commons, to inform the house, because there nor one allowance or disallowance are a great many new members made in parliament, that it should that were not of the last parliabe so now. It was usually ex ment; that we have power of adcused by compliment, and this journing ourselves by the clerkparliament has complimented itself In time of sickness of the speaker, out of its right. But I would not it has been done from day to day. lose a hair's breadth of the king's Gentlemen, our lives and liberright, nor the subjects. They are ties are preserved by this house, enemies to the nation, that, at and the privileges are inheritable this time, throw a bone betwixt to us. I must inform you,

that the king and us.--After all this Mr. Seymour attended the king danger and distraction we are in, yesterday, and he acquainted his must this house be made the next majesty with the unanimous choice precedent? I would not take the of him to be speaker, and that least right from the king. I move, • he hoped to have the king's • that the clerk may put the quer- ' good liking'. The king faid

, • tion for adjourning the house till • He liked very well the choice.'

to-morrow,' and in the interim - If so, this alteration of the the records may be searched for king's mind muft be from evilprecedents in this matter, and then disposed people about the king, ave may, inform the king how much who would create discontent bethis manner of proceeding is to his tween the king and his people. prejudice and yours.

The king faid once, ( He would Mr. Williams.) This is now a

have no favourites but the comquestion of right. I am sorry that mons of England. If you will our time, at the beginning of a fel not think fit to caufe Mr. Seymour fion, should be thus lot by the to declare what the king said to starting this question. Here is a him, I acquiesce. But I move

that worthy person named, Sir Tho- you will adjourn, mas Meres, and we; named and Mr. Garroway:] I am one that presented to the king a worthy one have fat here long, and have seen too. The commons have been great miscarriages, prorogations,

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and diffolutions. I am not afraid Colonel Birch.] I am heartily of it now, and I hope no man forry this has happened. This is else here is afraid of it. I would an unlucky stumble at the threshold, not give the king offence, but not before we get into the house. I part with one hair of our right. came hither with an intention (God If you will not stand to it here, you is my witness) to make this: will have a great many things put healing parliament." I have alupon you. I am satisfied that we ways heard here, that it is the uncould not fix upon a fitter perfon doubted right of this houseto.chule for fpeaker than Mr. Seymour; he their speaker, &c. I have ceason to is a privy counsellor, treasurer of believe Mr. Seymour very proper of the navy, and has done the king for the employment, and that he very good service here, which would be acceptable to his mamakes me wonder he should not jesty ; but he that did this with be approved of by the king. I the king may do'more. I would thought we could not have oblig- adjourn till-to-morrow, and make ed the king more. The king faid, a reprefentation of our right to + He would have no favourite but the king. - his people.'-And thus to have Mr. Powle.] This gives me aponr speaker rejected, what will you prehension that there is some perthink of it! Pray, gentlemen, let lon too near the king, who is afraid us feep upon it, and let the clerk of this parliament, I have obput the question for adjourning till served that, of late, those things of to-morrow.

the greatest momentare done withSir Thomas Lee.] I see it is the out any council at all; done in a univerfal opinion to adjourn, &c.

As for the prorogation therefore I shall say but a little. and diffolution of the last parliaThe laft parliament, a little before ment, there was not one word of the prorogation, information was the advice of the privy council in given the house of the danger of it. I fear no advice was asked, the king's person, and the house but given for fupporting the deaddressed the king, - To have a signs of private men.

I have ever care of his person, &c.' The an- taken the record to be, that no swer was, • The king was then man was ever refused being Speak• busy, but we should have an er when presented to the king, but 6account of our message ;' but for for fome disability of body; as three weeks we heard nothing, and in Sir John Popham's case, who we were prorogued. I take no desired to be excufed from that tice only how things grow by de- service by reason of disability of grees, We came up to this para body from wounds he received in liament with great joy, and

expec the wars, 28 Hen. VI. And latetation of doing good, and now wely Sir Job Charlton, not being are thus interrupted! This being able to endure the employment, by our condition, and we having pre reason of disability of body + Rut cedents plain in the case for us, I nothing of this can be objected would adjourn till to-morrow, and againt Mr. Seymour. Muit any then make a representation of the private perfon inform the king of thing to the king

his unfiineis, &c.1. without any

caute

corner.

home. I move, that we may have Sir William Portman.] There is fome persons nominated, of emi no precedent of a speaker presentnence about the king (though not ed to the king by the house, that privy counsellors, for they have has been rejected : and let us not the fole privilege of carrying make a precedent of addressing our messages) humbly to acquaint the king without a speaker, the king, That the matter deli Mr. Leveson Gower.] I would • vered by my lord chancellor, in would have any man cite a prece• his name, is of fo great impor- dent, whether ever any address tance, that we defire some far was made to the king without a

ther time to consider of it:' speaker ? (He spoke it rougbly, and And then, no doubt, but we shall several younger gentlemen called aloud, acquit ourselves as we ought to do. To the bar.') I move this way, because it should Mr. Vaughan.) Something much not be said that we come to a hafty be done ; and in this case we nuit resolution in so important a matter. create a precedentprime impresionis. I move that Sir Robert Carr, the Was there ever any precedent that chancellor of the dutchy, may go so many met together, and do with the message to the king; and nothing. I move you to make an I doubt not but we shall make out address to the king. our rights with all duty to the Sir Eliab Harvey. ] Our time is king.

but short, and pray let us not Sir Rober Carr. ] I humbly mispend it. I will name another move you, that the privy coun to go to the king with Carr, Lord fellors may carry the message to Rusel. the king. I was one, but I am Sir Christopher Musgrave.] I not now. I hope you will dis- conceive your proper question is, pense with me. There are none • Whether an address shall be of the council here now, but I made to the king for a longer suppose they will be here. time, &c. ?' And when that is

Mr. Sacheverell.) If you stay over, then you are to nominate for the privy counsellors, the black persons to attend the king; and rod will come up to call you up, I shall name a third. &c. and those gentlemen of the Mr. Powle.] I would have the privy council are not here, and question be, That an applicathen what will become of you ? tion Mall be made to the king that We have sent those to attend the the matter delivered by the lord king formerly who were no privy chancellor yesterday is of such counsellors, and I would have Carr great importance relating to the for one now.

Ipeaker, that we desire fome time Mr. Leveson Gower.] I would to consider of it.' know, whether ever the house The message was this : • That made an address to the king when the matter delivered by the lord they had no speaker ? I would have chancellor yesterday is of fuch Sacheverell `inform the house, • great importance, that this house whether there be any precedent of cannot immediately come to a that.

• resolution therein ; therefore do

• humbly

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humbly defire that his majesty Mr. Hampden.) Suppose the would be graciously pleased to king makes you no answer. Can grant some farther time to take you give your country a better acthe matter into consideration." count and answer of what you

Ordered, That lord Ruffel, lord have done already, than that you Cavendish, fir Henry Capel, and were about to make an humble fir Robert Carr, do attend his ma- representation to the king? I know jesty with this message.

no reason why we should not go Mr. Garroway ] I propose this about it presently; and that three to you; Whether, if the black

or four may withdraw to prepare rod comes, we shall not go up with it, let the issue be what it will. this message ourselves ?

Mr. Williams.] In this you give Colonel Birch.] I hope this the king no occasion of offence. course is not taken about our This may possibly be called "A speaker to make those that sent us remonftrance. But I would not hither to miftrust us. Therefore I vapour with a petition, and I desire, that presently three or four would give no occasion of offence. gentlemen may be chosen, to draw Sir Edward Dering.} If Mr. up an humble petition to the king, Seymour be our speaker, we may in few words, to represent to his lie under the penalty of sool. for majesty with what heart we came acting before we are qualified, by up to serve him and those that taking the oaths, and subscribing chose us, and in order to that we the test, &c. at the table. I would have chosen a speaker; and then stay this matter moved for, till hope that we may not be made a you have an answer from the king. precedent of a thing that was Lord Russel reports, That, acnever done before, in rejecting our cording to command, they have speaker, that so we may go about attended the king, and his majeity the business of the nation. is pleased to make this answer to

Sir Harbottle Grimstone. ] I fear the message, viz. , I have cona ; that such a petition to the king, as fidered your message, and do : is propofed, may grant too much consent to a farther time for you

of the point ; as that he is not to consider, till Tuesday next : speaker whom we have chosen, till And as I would not have my prebe be approved of by the king. rogative encroached upon, so I

Sir Thomas Lee.] The thing would not encroach upon your may be so drawn, as that we may privilege ; if a third person cannot yield the point in the least. not be found out for an expe

Mr. Broome Whorwood.] If this dient in the mcan time.' be your right, keep it; if not,

[Debate. ] give it up. I have fac long enough Serjeant Streete. When the here to see that our rights have difference was between the lords been attempted, and what is our and commons, in the case of Sir right I will never part with. Samuel Barnardifton, which you

Colonel Titus.) I think you are laboured under, the king found not ripe for any such petition, till out an expedient. That being the you have an answer from the king case, I will presume to name a whether we shall have longer time third person for speaker. But granted to us or not.

be w3s nct fifered.) VOL. VI,

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Mr.

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