Register of Debates in Congress: Comprising the Leading Debates and Incidents of the Second Session of the Eighteenth Congress: [Dec. 6, 1824, to the First Session of the Twenty-fifth Congress, Oct. 16, 1837] Together with an Appendix, Containing the Most Important State Papers and Public Documents to which the Session Has Given Birth: to which are Added, the Laws Enacted During the Session, with a Copious Index to the Whole ..., Volum 3;Volum 10;Volum 60

Forside
 

Hva folk mener - Skriv en omtale

Vi har ikke funnet noen omtaler på noen av de vanlige stedene.

Utvalgte sider

Innhold

Del 1
2839
Del 2
2927
Del 3
3065
Del 4
3293
Del 5
3491
Del 6
3499
Del 7
3515
Del 8
3535
Del 12
3689
Del 13
3733
Del 14
3991
Del 15
4003
Del 16
4023
Del 17
4067
Del 18
4091
Del 19
4109

Del 9
3617
Del 10
3627
Del 11
3655
Del 20
4111
Del 21
4153

Andre utgaver - Vis alle

Vanlige uttrykk og setninger

Populære avsnitt

Side 2851 - It not only serves as a shield to the executive, but it furnishes an additional security against the enaction of improper laws. It establishes a salutary check upon the legislative body, calculated to guard the community against the effects of faction, precipitancy, or of any impulse unfriendly to the public good, which may happen to influence a majority of that body.
Side 2907 - that whoever drew blood in the streets should be punished with the utmost severity," was held after long debate not to extend to the surgeon, who opened the vein of a person that fell down in the street with a fit. 5. But, lastly, the most universal and effectual way of discovering the true meaning of a law, when the words are dubious is by considering the reason and spirit of it or the cause which moved the legislator to enact it.
Side 2793 - ... unless the Secretary of the Treasury shall at any time otherwise order and direct ; in which case the Secretary of the Treasury shall immediately lay before Congress, if in session, and if not, immediately after the commencement of the next session, the reasons of such order or direction.
Side 3109 - The President shall have power to fill all vacancies that may happen during the recess of the Senate, by granting commissions which shall expire at the end of their next session; but no person rejected by the Senate shall be reappointed to the same office during their ensuing recess.
Side 2851 - ... by different modes of election and different principles of action, as little connected with each other as the nature of their common functions and their common dependence on the society will admit. It may even be necessary to guard against dangerous encroachments by still further precautions. As the weight of the legislative authority requires that it should be thus divided, the weakness of the executive may require, on the other hand, that it should be fortified.
Side 2907 - A grant, in its own nature, amounts to an extinguishment of the right of the grantor, and implies a contract not to reassert that right. A party is, therefore, always estopped by his own grant.
Side 2851 - ... is inspired by a supposed influence over the people, with an intrepid confidence in its own strength ; which is sufficiently numerous to feel all the passions which actuate -a multitude ; yet not so numerous as to be incapable of pursuing the objects of its passions, by means which reason prescribes ; it is against the enterprising ambition of this department, that the people ought to indulge all their jealousy, and exhaust all their precautions.
Side 2933 - That there shall be an Executive Department to be denominated the Department of War; and that there shall be a principal officer therein, to be called the Secretary for the Department of War, who shall perform and execute such duties as shall, from time to time, be enjoined on or entrusted to him by the President of the United States...
Side 3155 - Resolved, That the president is hereby authorized to cause to be prepared and circulated such documents and papers as may communicate to the people information in regard to the nature and operations of the bank.
Side 3013 - Nay, do not think I flatter; For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flatter'd? No; let the candied tongue lick absurd pomp, And crook the pregnant hinges of the knee Where thrift may follow fawning.

Bibliografisk informasjon