The Senator; or, Clarendon's parliamentary chronicle

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Side 216 - House has met before that day, or will meet on the day of the issue), issue his warrant to the clerk of the Crown to make out a new writ for electing another member in the room of the member whose seat has so become vacant.
Side 144 - I do know instances of men being picketed in Ireland till they fainted ; when they recovered, picketed again till they fainted ; recovered again, and again picketed, till they fainted a third time ; and, this, in order to extort from the tortured sufferers a confession, either of their own guilt, or of the guilt of their neighbours.
Side 142 - ... consequence of a presumption that the person who was the unfortunate object of such oppression was in hostility to the Government ; and yet that has been done in a part of the country as quiet and as free from disturbance as the city of London. Who states these things, my lords, should, I know, be prepared with proofs. I am prepared with them. Many of the circumstances I know of my own knowledge ; others I have received from such channels as will not permit me to hesitate one moment in giving...
Side 142 - I have seen the most wanton insults practised upon men of all ranks and conditions. I have seen the most grievous oppressions exercised, in consequence of a presumption that the person who was the unfortunate object of such oppression was in hostility to the Government ; and yet that has been done in a part of the country as quiet and as free from disturbance as the city of London.
Side 571 - A neglect of this, the most important of all parliamentary duties, must produce, and in our opinions it has already produced, consequences the most fatal to the dignity of the nation, the stability of the government, and the interests of the people. In the unconditional compliance with the demands of the executive government again proposed as the remedy, we perceive the real and fatal source of the evil. Year after year his Majesty's ministers have grounded their application to Parliament Upon the...
Side 51 - I have now the affliction of finding, that whatever I had apprehended from it has been very much exceeded by its effects, in raifing the infolence and audacity of the enemy, and in breaking down that fpirit and energy of government which can alone work out our fafety in this awful juncture, or give dignity and glory to our fall.
Side 51 - Houfe from being implicated in approving a negotiation, of which we know little more than that it has drawn down new calamities and indignities, new injuries and outrages on his Majefty and his people. Of thefe indeed too much is already known His...
Side 138 - Bofton," which was read a firft time, and ordered to be read a fecond time on Monday next.
Side 569 - I have thus particularly adverted to the parliamentary debut of the noble Lord, because it is by no means improbable, advanced in years and infirm in body as he is, that his speech of last session, to which I have also particularly alluded, may be among the last, if not the last, which...
Side 51 - On our fide, it is avowed that there was a departure from all the rules of common prudence, by...

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