Familiar Lectures on Botany, Practical, Elementary, and Physiological: With an Appendix, Containing Descriptions of the Plants of the United States and Exotics, &c., for the Use of Seminaries and Private Students

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F.J. Huntington & Company, 1838 - 432 sider
 

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Side 148 - But his bow abode in strength, And the arms of his hands were made strong By the hands of the mighty God of Jacob...
Side 147 - I must go seek some dewdrops here, And hang a pearl in every cowslip's ear.
Side 189 - The eternal regions : lowly reverent Towards either throne they bow, and to the ground With solemn adoration down they cast Their crowns inwove with amarant and gold ; Immortal amarant, a flower which once In Paradise, fast by the tree of life, Began to bloom...
Side 59 - , , Of ash, or lime, or beech, distinctly shine, Within the twilight of their distant shades; There, lost behind a rising ground, the wood Seems sunk, and shorten'd to its topmost boughs. No tree in all the grove but has its charms, Though each its hue peculiar...
Side 204 - The glory of Lebanon shall come unto thee, the fir tree, the pine tree, and the box together, to beautify the place of my sanctuary; and I will make the place of my feet glorious.
Side 217 - And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth : and it was so.
Side 218 - And Solomon's wisdom excelled the wisdom of all the children of the east country, and all the wisdom of Egypt.
Side 45 - The grand transition, that there lives and works A soul in all things, and that soul is God. The beauties of the wilderness are his, That make so gay the solitary place Where no eye sees them. And the fairer forms That cultivation glories in, are his. He sets the bright procession on its way, And marshals all the order of the year. He marks the bounds which winter may not pass, And blunts his pointed fury. In its case Russet and rude, folds up the tender germ Uninjured, with inimitable art, And ere...
Side 218 - O flowers That never will in other climate grow, My early visitation, and my last At even, which I bred up with tender hand From the first opening bud, and gave ye names, Who now shall rear ye to the sun, or rank Your tribes, and water from the ambrosial fount...
Side 43 - The fig-tree, not that kind for fruit renown'd, But such as, at this day, to Indians known; In Malabar or Decan spreads her arms, Branching so broad and long, that in the ground The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow About the mother tree, a pillar'd shade, High overarch'd, and echoing walks between...

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