History of Education

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American Book Company, 1904 - 343 sider
 

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Side 307 - diffuse such information respecting the organization and management of schools and school systems and methods of teaching as shall aid the people of the United States in the establishment and maintenance of efficient school systems, and otherwise promote the cause of education throughout the country.
Side 215 - I call, therefore, a complete and generous education that which fits a man to perform justly, skillfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Side 216 - The end then of Learning is to repair the ruines of our first Parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, and to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith makes up the highest perfection.
Side 216 - to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith makes up the highest perfection.
Side 246 - The whole education of women should be relative to men; to please them, to be useful to them, to make themselves honored and loved by them, to educate the young, to care for the older, to advise them, to console them, to make life agreeable and sweet to them, — these are the duties of women in every age.
Side 217 - As they begin to acquire character, and to reason on the difference between good and evil, there will be required a constant and sound indoctrinating to set them right and firm, instructing them more amply in the knowledge of virtue and the hatred of vice.
Side 313 - To elevate the character and advance the interests of the profession of teaching, and to promote the cause of popular education in the United States.
Side 217 - that which fits a man to perform justly, skillfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both public and private, of peace and war,
Side 28 - 6. Shall I tell you what knowledge is ? When you know a thing, to hold that you know it; and when you do not know a thing, to confess your ignorance.
Side 190 - socrates daily, without missing, every forenoon, and likewise some part of Tully every afternoon, for the space of a year or two, hath attained to such a perfect understanding in both tongues, and to such a ready utterance of the Latin, and that with such a judgment as there be few

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