The History of Canada: Canada under French rule

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Rowsell & Hutchison, 1890

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Side 284 - Thereupon the general rejoined: "Go, one of you, my lads, to Colonel Burton — ; tell him to march Webb's regiment with all speed down to Charles River, to cut off the retreat of the fugitives from the bridge.
Side 506 - Lawrence : and his Britannic Majesty consents to leave to the subjects of the Most Christian King the liberty of fishing in the gulph of St. Lawrence, on condition that the subjects of France do not exercise the said fishery but at the distance of three leagues from all the coasts...
Side 489 - I had but too much reason to expect your Majesty's displeasure. I did not come prepared for this exceeding goodness; pardon me, Sir, it overpowers, it oppresses me...
Side 505 - His Britannic majesty, on his side, agrees to grant the liberty of the Catholic religion to the inhabitants of Canada ; he will, consequently, give the most precise and most effectual orders, that his new Roman Catholic subjects may profess the worship of their religion, according to the rites of the Romish Church, as far as the laws of Great Britain permit.
Side 505 - Xlllth article of the treaty of Utrecht : which article is renewed and confirmed by the present treaty, (except what relates to the island of Cape Breton, as well as to the other islands and coasts in the mouth and in the gulph of St. Lawrence :) And his...
Side 264 - In this situation there is such a choice of difficulties that I own myself at a loss how to determine. The affairs of Great Britain I know require the most vigorous measures, but then the courage of a handful of brave men should be exerted only where there is some hope of a favourable event.
Side 272 - The officers and men will remember what their country expects from them, and what a determined body of soldiers, inured to war, is capable of doing against five weak French battalions, mingled with a disorderly peasantry. The soldiers must be attentive and obedient to , their officers and resolute in the execution of their duty.
Side 505 - The Island called Newfoundland, with the adjacent Islands, shall from this time forward belong of Right wholly to Britain, and to that end the Town and Fortress of Placentia, and whatever other Places in the said Island are in...
Side 485 - I am sorry for it, since otherwise he would have certainly compelled us to leave him [Has ruled us, may not I say, with a rod of iron !] But if he be resolved to assume the office of exclusively advising his Majesty and directing the operations of the War, to what purpose are we called to this Council ? When he talks of being responsible to the People, he talks the language of the House of Commons; forgets that, at this Board, he is only responsible to the King.
Side 507 - France ; provided that the navigation of the river Mississippi shall be equally free, as well to the subjects of Great Britain as to those of France, in its whole...

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