The Woodlanders

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Penguin, 1. aug. 1998 - 464 sider
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‘Tis a pity to let such a girl throw herself away upon him – a thousand pities!’

When country-girl, Grace Melbury, returns home from her middle-class school, she feels she is now above her suitor, the simple woodsman Giles Winterborne. Though marriage has been discussed between her and Giles, Grace soon finds herself captivated by Dr Edred Fitzpiers, a sophisticated newcomer to the area – a relationship that is encouraged by her socially ambitious father. Hardy’s novel of betrayal, disillusionment and moral compromise depicts a secluded community coming to terms with the disastrous impact of outside influences. And in his portrayal of Giles Winterborne, Hardy shows a man who responds deeply to the forces of the natual world, which, ultimately, betray him.

In her introduction Patricia Ingham examines class and gender differences, the influence of Darwinism, Hardy’s use of language and the symbolism of nature in the novel. This edition also includes a chronology, a map of Hardy’s Wessex, a list for further reading, appendices and a glossary.



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Review: The Woodlanders

Brukerevaluering  - Jessica - Goodreads

Anyone expecting a happy ending should not be reading this book. It is a literary masterpiece and a great demonstration of how life is not fair and how the different classes and society groups operate ... Les hele vurderingen

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Innhold

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
GENERAL EDITORS PREFACE
HARDYS LIFE AND WORKS MAP THE WESSEX OF THE NOVELS
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
INTRODUCTION
FURTHER READING
A NOTE ON THE HISTORY OF THE TEXT THE WOODLANDERS
VOLUME I
CHAPTER XVI
VOLUME II
CHAPTER XVII
VOLUME III
CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV

CHAPTER I
CHAPTER II
CHAPTER III
CHAPTER IV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII
CHAPTER XIII
CHAPTER XIV
CHAPTER XV
CHAPTER V
CHAPTER VI
CHAPTER VII
CHAPTER VIII
CHAPTER IX
CHAPTER X
CHAPTER XI
CHAPTER XII
CHAPTER XIII
CHAPTER XIV
CHAPTER XV
APPENDIX I
NOTES
GLOSSARY
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Om forfatteren (1998)

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840. In his writing, he immortalized the site of his birth—Egdon Heath, in Dorset, near Dorchester. Delicate as a child, he was taught at home by his mother before he attended grammar school. At sixteen, Hardy was apprenticed to an architect, and for many years, architecture was his profession; in his spare time, he pursued his first and last literary love, poetry. Finally convinced that he could earn his living as an author, he retired from architecture, married, and devoted himself to writing. An extremely productive novelist, Hardy published an important book every year or two. In 1896, disturbed by the public outcry over the unconventional subjects of his two greatest novels—Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Jude the Obscure—he announced that he was giving up fiction and afterward produced only poetry. In later years, he received many honors. He died on January 11, 1928, and was buried in Poet’s Corner, in Westminster Abbey. It was as a poet that he wished to be remembered, but today critics regard his novels as his most memorable contribution to English literature for their psychological insight, decisive delineation of character, and profound presentation of tragedy.

Patricia Ingham is senior research fellow and reader at St. Anne's College, Oxford. She is the general editor of Thomas Hardy's fiction in Penguin Classics and edited Gaskell's North and South for the series.


Patricia Ingham is senior research fellow and reader at St. Anne's College, Oxford. She is the general editor of Thomas Hardy's fiction in Penguin Classics and edited Gaskell's North and South for the series.

Bibliografisk informasjon