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kunde und Infectionskrankheiten, II Abtheil, Vol. 25, pages 161-178

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CHAPTER V

EGGS

DOUBTLESS eggs of various kinds were among the very earliest of human foods. At the present time only the eggs of hens, ducks, geese, guinea fowl, and turkeys are commonly used for food; and of these, hens' eggs are so much more abundant than all others that, unless otherwise explained, all statements made here may be understood as referring to hens' eggs.

Production The production of eggs is widely distributed. It is estimated that about nine tenths of all farms in the United States keep chickens and produce eggs. It will be seen from Fig. 9 that in poultry culture there is less tendency toward concentration in particular regions than is the case with many other food industries.

It is difficult to measure the egg production of the country, because eggs are so largely consumed by the producer or sold at retail without going through trade channels from which accurate statistics can be obtained. The United States Census Bureau estimates the egg industry at seventeen and one half dozen eggs per capita per year, i.e. an average of 210 eggs per year or 4 eggs per week for each person in the United States.

Pennington and Pierce, writing in 1910,' reported that only the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Texas, Tennessee, and Kentucky produce more eggs than are consumed within their own borders, and this

1 United States Department of Agriculture, Yearbook for 1910.

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