A treatise on maritime law: Including the law of shipping; the law of marine insurance; and the law and practice of admiralty, Volum 2

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Little, Brown and company, 1859
 

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Side 236 - People, of what Nation, Condition, or Quality soever, Barratry of the Master and Mariners, and of all other Perils, Losses, and Misfortunes, that have or shall come to the Hurt, Detriment, or Damage of the said Goods and Merchandises and Ship, &c., or any Part thereof...
Side 362 - Assured, his or their factors, servants and assigns, to sue, labor and travel for, in and about the defense, safeguard and recovery of the said goods and...
Side 288 - Merchandises until the same be there discharged and safely landed ; and it shall be lawful for the said Ship, &c., in this Voyage to proceed and sail to and touch and stay at any Ports or Places whatsoever without Prejudice to this Insurance.
Side 512 - ... where is drawn in question the validity of a treaty or statute of, or an authority exercised under the United States, and the decision is against their validity ; or where is drawn in question the validity of a statute of, or an authority exercised under any state, on the ground of their being repugnant to the constitution, treaties, or laws of the United States...
Side 93 - That no bill of sale, mortgage, hypothecation, or conveyance of any vessel, or part of any vessel of the United States, shall be valid against any person other than the grantor or mortgagor, his heirs and devisees, and persons having actual notice thereof; unless such bill of sale, mortgage, hypothecation, or conveyance be recorded in the office of the Collector of the Customs where such vessel is registered or enrolled...
Side 755 - In all cases where a writ of error or an appeal shall be brought to this court from any judgment or decree rendered thirty days before the...
Side 50 - ... as by the known usage of trade or the like, acquired a peculiar sense distinct from the popular sense of the same words; or unless the context evidently points out that they must, in the particular instance and in order to effectuate the immediate intention of the parties to that contract, be understood in some other special and peculiar sense.
Side 528 - That all the before-mentioned courts of the United States shall have power to issue writs of scire facias, habeas corpus, and all other writs, not specially provided for by statute, which may be necessary for the exercise of their respective jurisdictions, and agreeable to the principles and usages of law.
Side 717 - But unless it appears to the satisfaction of the court that the witness is then dead, or gone out of the United States, or to a greater distance than one hundred miles from the place where the court is sitting, or that by reason of age, sickness, bodily infirmity, or imprisonment, he is unable to travel and appear at court, such deposition shall not be used in the cause...
Side 745 - ... to abide by and pay the money awarded by the final decree rendered by the court or the appellate court, if any appeal . intervenes, as the one or the other course shall be ordered by the court.

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