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May 31, 1898, with the Brooklyn, Bath and West End Railroad Company, the Nassau Electric Railroad Company and the Prospect Park and Coney Island Railroad Company whereby agreements of April 30 and June 29, 1895, were modified so as to cancel the provisions for the lease to the Brooklyn, Bath and West End Railroad Company by the Prospect Park and Coney Island Railroad Company of lands and trackage rights in the Union depot property between 36th and 37th streets, and Fifth and Seventh avenues, and so as to give the Prospect Park and Coney Island Railroad Company sole and exclusive right of way over two tracks leading from the Union station to the old city line, instead of over one and part of another, it being the intention that the Prospect Park Company should have u the sole and exclusive use and control of, and right of way over the whole length of the two tracks leading out of the Union depot grounds at Seventh avenue between said Union depot and the tracks of the Prospect Park Company at or near the old city line, forever."

Consolidation agreements. By indenture made May 27, 1887, pursuant to chapter 282, laws of 1886, this Company merged the Prospect Park and Coney Island Railroad Company (no. 5,58).

By certificate of surrender of capital stock, filed in the office of the secretary of state December 27, 1893, the South Brooklyn Central Railroad Company (no. 607) was merged into- this Company.

By a merger agreement filed in the secretary of state's office September 21, 1898, this Company merged the Brooklyn, B'ath and West End Railroad Company (No. 66).

By a merger agreement, filed in the office of the secretary of state January 26, 1899, this Company was merged into the Nassau Electric Railroad Company (no. 390).

Operation. The routes of this Company are now being operated by the Nassau Electric Railroad Company.

7 The Atlantic Cable Railroad Company

(Brooklyn)

Incorporation. September 24, 1888, General Street Railroad Law of 1884; for purpose of constructing a street surface railroad; corporate life 100 years; capital stock $150,000; route (about 1% miles) as follows:

At or near the intersection of Surf avenue and West 20th street (Coney Island), running thence along Surf avenue, West Fifth street, Sea Breeze avenue and East Fifth street to or near the Brighton hotel.

Construction. ]STo record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

8 Avenue C Railroad Company

(Manhattan)

Incorporation. December 18, 1868; General Eailroad Law of

1850; corporate life, 99 years, from December 10, 1868; capital

stock, $500,000; route (about 6% miles) as follows:

Commencing at Duane street and West street; thence along Duane street to Greenwich; along Greenwich to Charlton; along Charlton to Prince; along Prince to the Bowery; along the Bowery to Stanton and along Stanton to Pitt; along Pitt to Avenue C; along Avenue C to Third street; along Avenue C from Third to the northern extremity of said Avenue C; also through and along Third to First; along First to East Houston; along East Houston to the Bowery; along the Bowery to West Houston, and through and along West Houston to Washington; along Washington to Duane; along Duane to the place of beginning; single track, except between Duane and Greenwich; along Avenue C from Third street to extremity of Avenue C, and along Duane street, which is double track.

Legislative franchise. By chapter 625, laws of 1868, Alfred B. Darling and others, the grantees and incorporators of this Company, were authorized to construct a railroad on the streets as set forth above in the charter.

By chapter 19, laws of 1871, the Company was granted an extension to construct its road on the following streets:

On 17th street from Avenue C to Avenue A, single track; on 18th street from Avenue C to Avenue A, single track; on Avenue A from 17th street to ISth street, single track; on Avenue A from 18th street to 23d street, double track; on 23d street from Avenue A to First avenue, double track; on First avenue from 23d street to 36th street, double track; on 36th street from First avenue to Lexington avenue, single track; on 35th street from First avenue to Lexington avenue, single track; on Lexington avenue from 35th street to 4'2d street, single or double track; on 42d street from Lexington avenue to Fourth avenue, double track; on Charlton street from Greenwich street to West street, single track; on West Houston street from Washington street to West street, single track; on West street from West Houston street to Chambers street, double track; on 10th street from Avenue C to Avenue D, single track; on 10th street from Avenue D to the East river, double track; on 11th street from Avenue D to Avenue C, single track; on Avenue D from 10th street to 11th street, single track.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart I, no. 16.) April 21, 1874, the Company and the Christopher and Tenth Street Railroad Company entered into an agreement providing for the joint use of tracks in Tenth street from Avenue C east to the foot thereof.

May 26, 1874, the Company's property and franchises were sold under foreclosure, and on June 9, 1874, transferred to the Houston, West Street and Pavonia Ferry Rail-Road Company (no. 279).

Construction and operation. The Company's road was constructed and opened for operation in 1870. The present operation is by the Now York Railways Company.

9 Bath and Coney Island Bridge Company

(Brooklyn)

This is not a railroad company. It was organized April 26, 1861, under chapter 338 of the laws of 1861, as a plank road and bridge company. Prior to May 25, 1868, it had acquired a right of way which on that date it conveyed together with its franchises to the Brooklyn, Bath and Coney Island Rail Road Company (no. 64). The Company's relation to the railroad system of Brooklyn is also shown on chart IV, no. 34.

io The Bay Ridge and Sea Shore Railroad Company of Long

Island

(Brooklyn)

Incorporation. January 15, 1873; General Railroad Law of 1850; corporate life 1,000 years; capital stock $135,000; route (about 13 miles) as follows:

From Bay Ridge in the town of New Utrecht to Canarsie in the town of New Lots.

Maps. January 15, 1873, the Company filed in the register's office of Kings County a map of its route.

Construction. ~Eo record of any construction. In the state engineer's report of 1878, the Company is described as extinct.

Ii The Bayridge and Seaside Railroad Company

(Brooklyn and Queens) Incorporation. August 8, 1871, General Railroad Law of 1850; corporate life 1,000 years; capital stock $250,000; route (about

12 miles) as follows:

From Bay Ridge, town of New Utrecht, to the township qf JJemrjstead.

Construction. N0 record of any construction, and the state engineer's report for 1878, describes the Company as extinct. The Company's enterprise seems to have been abandoned in 1873, when John Mackay, one of the directors of this Company and several of his associates organized The Bay Eidge and Sea Shore Railroad Company of Long Island, the route of which was in part identical with that of this Company.

12 Bay Shore Rail-road Company

(Queens)

Incorporation. December 2, 1865; General Railroad Law of 1850; for the purpose of building a street railroad from a point in the village of Flushing to a convenient point in the village of Whitestone; corporate life, 99 years; capital stock, $50,000; route, three miles.

Stock. In a report made to the state engineer and surveyor, under date of December 28, 1869, it was stated that $4,500 of the Company's capital stock was subscribed, and $450 paid in.

Construction. Under date of November 29, 1867, the president of the Company reported that the route of the road had been denned by order of the Supreme Court, and surveyed, and that construction of the road had been commenced. On December 28, 1868, the secretary of the Company reported that in consequence of alterations in the grade of some of the streets on which the track was to be laid it had become necessary to defer work for the present. Finally, under date of December 28, 1869, the following was reported: "In consequence of the building of a steam road from Flushing to Whitestone, the two places intended to be connected, work on this road has been abandoned.''

13 Beach Pneumatic Transit Company

(Manhattan)

Incorporation. August 28, 1868; chapter 842, laws of 1868; for the purpose of transmitting letters, packages and merchandise in the cities of 'New York and Brooklyn and across the North and East rivers, by means of pneumatic tubes, to be constructed beneath the surface of the streets and public places in said cities, and under the waters of said rivers; corporate life 50 years; capital stock, $5,000,000.

Legislative franchise. By chapter 842, laws of 1868, Alfred E. Beach and his associates who formed the Company, were given a franchise to construct and operate pneumatic tubes under the streets and public places of New York and Brooklyn, under the East river, and also under the North river as far as the shore of New Jersey. It was provided in this act that the grantees should first construct one line of pneumatic tubes from the post office in Nassau street between Liberty and Cedar streets northwardly not extending above 14th street, and operated successively for a period of three months before proceeding to lay down any other lines of tubes. In the city of New York the tubes; were to be laid under the supervision of the Croton aqueduct department, and in the city of Brooklyn under the supervision of the board of water commissioners.

By chapter 512, laws of 1869, the act of 1868 was amended by requiring that if the postmaster should neglect or refuse to give his consent to connect the tube with the post office, the grantees should, in lieu of building the line as required in the original act, construct a line of tubes from Warren street at its connection with Broadway, southerly under Broadway to Cedar street or to some point within 200 feet of it.

By chapter 185, laws of 1873, this Company was authorized

to "construct, maintain and operate an underground railway for

the transportation of passengers and property in the city of New

York under the following streets:"

Under Broadway from the Battery and Bowling Green to Madison square, and thence to Central park and Eighth avenue; under Madison square and Madison avenue, from Broadway to the Harlem river and under the bed of the river to the northerly shore.

This railway was to be operated " by means of tubes of enlarged interior diameter sufficient for the construction of a railway or railways therein, and for the running of cars and the carrying of passengers therein "; the Company was authorized to lay in connection with its tubes two or more railway tracks with the necessary turnouts and stations for the accommodation of passengers and for the handling of packages and freight, and was authorized to make connection " with the Harlem and connecting railroads" at 42d street or any point north of that street, and also to make

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