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Construction and operation. Main line/ Astoria ferry to Hunter's Point ferry (four miles) opened about 1869; branch on Thompson avenue never constructed.

2 Astoria and Hunter's Point Rail Road Company

(Queens)

Incorporation. January 31, 1877; General Railroad Law of

1850; reorganization of The Astoria and Hunter's Point Railroad Company (see no. 1); corporate life, 50 years; capital stock, $75,000.

Franchise rights. Acquired all franchise rights of original company, and also tracks and equipment of railroad extending from Astoria to Hunter's Point.

Stock and bonds. In 1877, the Company had -a funded debt of $21,750 and capital stock paid in to the amount of $36,250. In 1882, the capital stock had all been paid in, and the funded debt reduced to $25,000. The Company at this time had a floating debt of $8,080. In 1884, it appears that the floating debt had been reduced to $1500, the capital stock and funded debt remaining the same as before. In 1885, in a report made by the Steinway and Hunter's Point Railroad Company, it appears that that company assumed the floating debt of the Astoria and Hunter's Point Rail Road Company, amounting to $17,556. It appeared also that the Steinway Company had purchased $20,000 mortgage bonds of the Steinway Avenue and Bowery Bay Railroad Company besides the $25,000 bonds and most of the capital stock of the Astoria Company.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart III, no. 14.) November 27, 1877, road leased to Patrick J. Gleason, rent to commence May 1, 1877, at an annual rental of $4,000. It appears from the state engineer's report that the Long Island City and Newtown Rail Road Company, successor company to the Long Island City and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company, of which Mr. Gleason was president and superintendent, operated the Astoria and Hunter's Point Railroad until October 31, 1884, when lease was abrogated. The rental paid by the Long Island City and Newtown Railroad Company was $3,000 yearly.

July 25, 1883, the Astoria and Hunter's Point Rail Road Company took a lease of the property of the Steinway Avenue and Bowery Bay Railroad Company. By agreement, dated August 5, 1883, and filed in the secretary of state's office, April 16, 1885, the Steinway Avenue and Bowery Bay Railroad Company (no. 648) surrendered its capital stock to the Astoria and Hunter's Point Rail Road Company. In the meantime, on January 27, 1885, the Astoria and Hunter's Point Rail Road had been leased to the Steinway and Hunter's Point Railroad Company.

November 26, 1887, a certificate of surrender of capital stock of the Astoria and Hunter's Point Rail Road Company to the Steinway and Hunter's Point Railroad Company (no. 647) was filed in the office of the secretary of state, in accordance with an agreement entered into by the two companies on April 13, 1885.

3 Astoria, Blissville and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company

(Queens)

Incorporation. December 8, 1891; Railroad Law of 1890; for the purpose of constructing a street surface railroad, part single and part double track; corporate life, 99 years; capital stock, $100,000; route, as follows:

From foot of Fulton street at the East river, in Long Island City (Astoria ferry), through Fulton street, the Boulevard, Main street, Grand, Newtown and Baldwin avenues, (across) Jackson avenue, Gosman avenue and Greenpoint avenue to Bradley avenue, at or near the entrance to Calvary cemetery. As an alternative route, instead of passing through the Boulevard and Main street, the Company was authorized to go along any street or avenue that might in the future he opened in the general direction of Grand avenue, connecting Grand avenue east of Main street with Fulton street.

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

4 Astoria Street Railroad Company

(Queens)

Incorporation. November 16, 1891; for the purpose of constructing a double-track street railroad in Long Island City; corporate life, 99 years; capital stock, $100,000; route as,follows:

Commencing at the East river, at the foot of Fulton street (Astoria ferry); running thence along Fulton street, the Boulevard, Main street and Grand avenue to the boundary line of the town of Newtown (Bowery Bay road) ; or in lieu of the Boulevard and Main street, traversing any street that may hereafter be opened in the general direction of Grand avenue, connecting at Grand avenue, as at present laid out east of Main street with Fulton street.

Special franchise. December 8, 1891, received a franchise from the common council of Long Island City, which appears never to have been acted upon by the mayor. The route described in the franchise, commences at the East river, at the foot of Fulton street, along Fulton street, the Boulevard, Main street and Grand avenue to the town of Newtown.

Construction. No record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

5 The Atlantic Avenue Elevated Railroad Company

(Brooklyn)

Incorporation. April 15, 1890, Eapid Transit Act of 1875; article of association prepared by the board of commissioners, appointed by the mayor in the city of Brooklyn, December 23, 1889; for purpose of constructing an elevated railroad to be operated by steam, corporate life 99 years; capital stock $1,000,000; route as follows:

(1) Commencing at or near the Union Ferry Company's building at the western termination of Atlantic avenue, and running thence easterly through Atlantic avenue to the city line (line between Brooklyn and Queens);

(2) commencing at a point in Atlantic avenue between Sackman street and Jardine place, and running thence southerly over, under, through or across private property to connect with the New York, Brooklyn and Manhattan Beach Railway at a point between Liberty avenue and Eastern parkway;

(3) a single track spur branching from, the main line on Atlantic avenue at a point between Fifth and Sixth avenues, and continuing easterly and southerly over, through, under or across private property in the block bounded by Sixth avenue, Carlton avenue, Atlantic avenue and Pacific street; also a single track spur connecting at the point in Atlantic avenue between Berriman street and Shepard avenue, and continuing easterly with a curve to the south over, through, under or across private property to a point between Berriman street and Montauk avenue and north of Liberty avenue; also a track branching from the main line in Atlantic avenue between Montauk and Atkins avenues, and continuing westerly with a curve to the south, over, through, under or across private property so as to make a Y; also a curve from the main line at a point between South Elliott place and Fort Greene place, thence running northerly and westerly over, through, under or across private property into the existing yard of The Long Island Railroad Company east of Flatbush avenue. The road on Atlantic avenue and the branch to connect with the New York, Brooklyn and Manhattan Beach Railway were to be double track elevated railroads.

The specifications adopted by the rapid transit commissioners and made a part of this Company's articles of association provided that no freight trains should be run on the elevated structure west of Flatbush avenue.

The fares to be charged on Company's road were not to exceed 10 cents; and between five and eight o'clock in the morning and 4:30 and 7:30 o'clock in the evening on week days, and between seven and 10 o'clock in the morning on Sundays not to exceed five cents.

The validity of the Company's charter was attacked, but was sustained by the Court of Appeals December 20, 1892 (136 K Y. 292).

Stock. In the Company's report to the Railroad Commission for 1890, the amount of capital stock subscribed and paid in was given as $50,000.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart V, no. 1.) This Company was incorporated in the interests of The Long Island Railroad Company. By its articles of association it was required before it undertook to construct any part of its road, to first enter into an agreement with The Long Island Railroad Company and The Atlantic Avenue Railroad Company, for the use of Atlantic avenue. In case such agreement should be terminated by either of the parties, and steam cars should be restored to the surface of Atlantic avenue by the Long Island Railroad Company, the right to maintain the elevated road should thereupon cease.

Atlantic avenue improvement. The improvement provided for in chapter 499, laws of 1897, affecting Atlantic avenue and which made the Long Island Railroad a combination elevated and tunnel railroad from Flatbush avenue to the easterly city limits, apparently rendered the project of The Atlantic Avenue Elevated Railroad Company unnecessary, though the Company's corporate existence is still maintained by the Long Island Railroad Company. It reported to the Railroad Commission, and has since 1907 reported to the Public Service Commission.

6 The Atlantic Avenue Railroad Company of Brooklyn

(Brooklyn)

Incorporation. May 1, 1872; General Railroad Law of 1850; corporate life, 1,000 years; capital stock, $700,000; route (about 20 miles) as follows:

Commencing at the Fulton ferry in the city of Brooklyn, running thence through and along Furman street with a double track to Atlantic avenue; thence and also from South ferry through and along Atlantic avenue with double tracks to the termination of Atlantic avenue at the dividing line between the counties of Kings and Queens; thence upon and along and over the tracks and land now or formerly laid and owned by the Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad Company to the village of Jamaica in the county of Queens. Also from Atlantic avenue through and along Flatbush avenue in the city of Brooklyn with double tracks to Fifth avenue; thence through and along Fifth avenue with double tracks to 36th street. Also commencing at Bridge street ferry in the city of Brooklyn and running thence with double or single tracks through and along Bridge street to John street; thence through and along John street with single or double tracks to Hudson avenue; thence and also from the ferry at the foot of Hudson avenue through and along Hudson avenue with double or single tracks to and across Fulton street to Flatbush avenue; thence through and along Flatbush avenue to Prospect park, diverging at the Park plaza and across the same to Ninth avenue; thence through and along Ninth avenue with double tracks to Greenwood cemetery. Also from Atlantic avenue with double tracks through and along Vanderbilt avenue to and across Prospect Park plaza to Ninth avenue, connecting with the double tracks therein.

William Richardson, on November 14, 1867, acquired by lease portion of The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railway Company (no. 50) within the city of Brooklyn and at the same time purchased the rolling stock and real estate owned in fee by that company. November 1, 1872, Richardson acquired by deed from one Stevens, referee, the property and franchises of The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railway Company. The property acquired by this deed included that part of the railroad of The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad Company extending from its commencement at the ferry at the foot of Atlantic street, Brooklyn, to its termination in the village and town of Jamaica; including the right to construct branches to Flushing or Flatbush as secured by the act incorporating The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railroad Company together with the real estate upon which the railroad was at that time, or had been constructed, and a strip of land 25 feet wide extending from the easterly limits of the city of Brooklyn through the center of Atlantic avenue, easterly therefrom to Van Sinderin avenue, and thence in a curved line to the existing track of The Brooklyn and Jamaica Railway Company, in the village of East New York, at or near the Howard house,* also including all the privileges

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