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public telephones in the railroad company's station, and the railroad company waived the payment by the telephone company of $16,000 per annum on account of telephone service.

August 15, 1898, this Company entered into an agreement with The New York Central and Hudson River Eail Road Company, lessee of the New-York and Harlaem Kail-Road Company, for the joint occupancy of the passenger station of the latter at 125th street, to accommodate passengers of this Company traveling from or to points north and east of Woodlawn station. This Company agreed to pay for the joint use of such station, $250 monthly.

September 19, 1902, this Company entered into an agreement with The New York Transfer Company, whereby the Transfer Company acquired the exclusive privilege of soliciting from passengers of the railroad company on its New York bound trains the transportation of such passengers and baggage in the city of New York. March 2, 1909, a new agreement was entered into by the same companies, to take effect January 1, 1909, and to continue in force for three years. Under this agreement the Transfer Company was required to pay to the railroad company $7,500 per annum for the privileges so enjoyed.

In October, 1904, the Company acquired a controlling interest in the New York, Ontario & Western Railway Company.

December 21, 1904, the Company entered into an agreement with the City of New York relative to the six tracking of its leased road, .The Harlem River.& Port Chester Rail Road Company, from the Harlem river to the northerly boundary of the city, Borough of Bronx, and the elimination of existing grade crossings along that line.

April 25, 1905, this Company entered into an agreement with the New York and Eastern News Company whereby the latter obtained the exclusive right to sell newspapers, periodicals and books in all the passenger trains and at the stations of the Company in the city of New York, except in the Grand Central station.

July 13, 1905, the Company as lessee of The Harlem River & Port Chester Railroad Company entered into an agreement with the City of New York, in which provision was made to close portions of Cypress avenue and other streets and avenues in the Borough of the Bronx.

December 11, 1905, this Company entered into an agreement with the Adams Express Company, whereby the latter obtained the right to transact all the express transportation business over the road of the Company. October 1, 1909, this Company entered into an agreement with the Westcott Express Company, to which agreement The New York Central and Hudson River Rail Road Company was also party, giving the express company the exclusive right to transport passengers and baggage to and from the Grand Central depot, in the city of New York.

June 30, 1906, a deed and agreement was entered into between the City of New York, The Harlem River & Port Chester Rail Road Company and this Company, relative to grants of lands in Bronx and Pelham Bay Parkway and in Pelham Bay Park authorized by chapter 670 of the laws of 1905.

In November, 1906, the Company acquired all the stock of the Millbrook Company.

June 12, 1907, an agreement was entered into between The Harlem River & Port Chester Rail Road Company, this Company as its lessee, and the City of New York, wherein provision was made to close a portion of Willow avenue in the Borough of the Bronx.

July 24, 1907, this Company entered into an agreement with The New York Central and Hudson River Rail Road Company, lessee of the New-York and Harlaem Rail-Road Company, for the accommodation of this Company in the new Grand Central depot, which was being constructed by the Central Company. The terms of this contract provided for the use in common with the Central Company of the railroad terminal under construction. This agreement supersedes the previous agreements between the companies made in 1872, 1885, 1897, 1898 and 1899, and is to continue in force during the corporate existence of the companies or their assigns. The Company was to pay a proportion of the various items of cost of the operation of the new terminal.

Mileage. The length of tracks in miles of the New York division of this Company, as shown for the year 1912, is as follows:

[merged small][graphic][graphic][table]

TRACKAGE RIGHTS Woodlawn Junction to Grand Central Terminal — mileage, main line.... 47.83 Woodlawn Junction to Grand Central Terminal — mileage, side tracks... 30.44

498 The New York, New Jersey and Eastern Railroad Company

(Manhattan and Brooklyn)

Incorporation. June 6, 1892, The Eailroad Law of 1890; for purpose of constructing an underground tunnel railroad to be operated by steam, electricity or some other power; corporate life 99 years, capital stock, $100,000; route (about five miles) as follows:

From some point in the city of Brooklyn at or near the junction of Flatbush and Atlantic avenues; thence by the most convenient or eligible route or routes under ground to and under the city of New York, and under the waters of the East and Hudson rivers to some convenient and eligible point in the boundary line between the state of New York and New Jersey, with a branch or branches running from boundary line aforesaid to some convenient and eligible point at or near the Battery in said city and county of New York, and said railroad may construct a part of its said road in the state of New Jersey from said point on said boundary line to some convenient point in Jersey City or the city of Hoboken.

Maps. December 6, 1892, the Company filed in the county clerk's office of Kings County

a map of its route from New Jersey state line to Cortlandt street and along Cortlandt street and Maiden lane to and across the East river, to and along Pineapple street and private property, to and along Fulton street and Flatbush avenue, to and along Atlantic avenue to Fifth avenue.

Intercorporate relations. May 11, 1893, this Company was consolidated with the New York and New Jersey Underground Railway Company to form The Brooklyn, New York and Jersey City Terminal Railway Company (no. 103),

Construction. No record of any construction.

499 The New York Quick Transit Railway Company

(The Bronx)

Incorporation. December 30, 1873; General Railroad Law of

1850; corporate life, 90 years; capital stock, $500,000; route

(about five miles) as follows:

From a convenient point on the northeasterly shore of the Harlem river, northerly through the town of Morrisania and the town of West Farms, to and across the Bronx river into the county and town of Westchester.

Map. December 30, 1873, this Company filed in the office of the register of Westchester County,

a map and profile of its route, dated the day of filing, which was transferred to the pffice of the register of New York County on November 17, 1905.

Construction. IsTo record of any construction. The Company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

500 The New York Rail Road Company

(Manhattan)

Incorporation. December 24, 1860, General Eailroad Law of

1850; for purpose of constructing and operating a horse railway;

corporate life 99 years, capital stock $1,500,000; route (about 30

miles) as follows:

From a point on the Harlem river at or near the termination of Fifth avenue to a point at or near the corner of Broadway and Barclay street on the line of such streets and highways as may be specially authorized by the legislature of the state and through such other streets, avenues, lanes, and highways, in the said city of New York as may have been or may hereafter be authorized by special act of the legislature whether directly to this Company or to other persons or companies and leased, sold, or assigned to them.

Construction. JsTo record of any construction. In the state engineer's report, 1878, the Company is marked extinct.

501 The New York Railway Company

(Manhattan and The Bronx)

Incorporation. April 5, 1871, chapter 300, laws of 1871; by Peter B. Sweeny, William M. Tweed, Jr. and others; for purpose of constructing a railroad to be propelled by steam or other power over and across streets, avenues, squares and grounds in the city of ~New York, and by viaduct or otherwise into the county of Westchester; corporate life 100 years; capital stock $25,000,000; route as follows:

Commencing at or near to Chambers street, between Broadway and Chatham street, and running from thence northwardly through the blocks and across streets between Broadway and Chatham street and the Bowery, to or near to Houston street or Bleecker street, and from thence with one branch of said viaduct and railway diverging easterly through the blocks and across the streets to and across the Bowery in the vicinity of Bond street or Great Jones street, and from thence passing northeasterly through the blocks and across the streets, roads or avenues, between the Third avenue and the East river to the Harlem river; and also with another branch of said viaduct and railway diverging westerly from the first mentioned line from near Houston street or Bleecker street, and running through the blocks and across the streets to and across Broadway near to Houston street or Bleecker street; thence running westerly through the blocks and across the streets to and across Carmine street or the Sixth avenue, and from thence through the blocks and across the streets, roads or avenues west of Sixth avenue and west of Central park to the Harlem river or Spuyten Duyvil creek, near to Kingsbridge.

By chapter 808, laws of 1871, chapter 300 incorporating the Company, was amended making it unlawful for the mayor, aldermen and commonalty of the city of New York to make any subscription whatever to the capital stock of the Company until other parties shall have actually subscribed for and taken at least $1,000, 000 of the capital stock of the said Company, and paid thereon to the treasurer of the Company in money at least 10 per cent of the par value thereof; also authorizing the Company to build a branch railway from any of its tracks or railways across any lands, streets or places to connect with any other railroad authorized by law, and to agree with the owners of such railroad for the running of trains partly on one railroad and partly on the other.

Construction. The plans of the Company were interfered with by Mr. Tweed's political difficulties and the proposed road was never constructed. In the state engineer's report for 1878 the Company was described as extinct.

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