Memoirs of the Public Life and Administration of the Right Honourable, the Earl of Liverpool

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Saunders and Otley, 1827 - 649 sider
 

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Side 473 - That an humble address be presented to His Royal Highness the Prince Regent to...
Side 105 - His Majesty is persuaded that the unremitting industry with which our enemies persevere in their avowed design of effecting the separation of Ireland from this kingdom cannot fail to engage the particular attention of Parliament. And His Majesty recommends it...
Side 568 - Did his noble friend conceive, that the commercial greatness of England had arisen from any superior advantage in its climate, any superior fertility in its soil ? No. He might go to the east or to the west, to the north or to the south...
Side 636 - That this House is anxious for the accomplishment of this purpose, at the earliest period that shall be compatible with the well-being of the slaves themselves, with the safety of the colonies, and with a fair and equitable consideration of the interests of private property.
Side 131 - ... higher orders of the Catholics, and by furnishing to a large class of your Majesty's Irish subjects a proof of the good 'will of the United Parliament, afford the best chance of giving full effect to the great object of the Union, — that of tranquillizing Ireland, and attaching it to this country. ' It is with inexpressible regret, after all he now knows of your Majesty's sentiments, that Mr. Pitt troubles your Majesty, thus at large, with the general grounds of his opinion, and finds himself...
Side 381 - Highness effectually to maintain the great and important interests of the United Kingdom. " And Mr. Perceval humbly trusts, that whatever doubts your Royal Highness may entertain with respect to the constitutional propriety of the measures which have been adopted, your Royal Highness will feel assured that they could not have been recommended by his Majesty's servants, nor sanctioned by Parliament, but upon the sincere, though possibly erroneous, conviction, that they in no degree trenched upon the...
Side 42 - ... that nation which calls herself the most free and the most happy of them all. Even if these miserable beings were proved guilty of every crime before you take them off (of which, however, not a single proof is adduced), ought we to take upon ourselves the office of executioners ? And even if we condescend so far, still can we be justified in taking them, unless we have clear proof that they are criminals ? But if we go much...
Side 130 - ... that if such an Oath, containing (among other provisions) a denial of the power of Absolution from its obligations, is not a security from Catholics, the sacramental test is not more so : — that the political circumstances under which the exclusive laws originated...
Side 162 - This, it was true, had been found unattainable; but we had the satisfaction of knowing, that we had survived the violence of the revolutionary fever, and we had seen the extent of its principles abated. We...
Side 59 - England will never consent that France shall arrogate the power of annulling at her pleasure, and under the pretence of a natural right of which she makes herself the only judge, the political system of Europe, established by solemn treaties, and guaranteed by the consent of all the powers.

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