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De Monfort.

Sonnet. Written at Malvern, July 11, 1793 519

Acl l.

332 Sonnet. On reviewing the foregoing, Septem-

II.

337 ber 21, 1797

519

III.

311

IV.

315

V.

319

COLERIDGE.

The Martyr.

Act I.

356 Sibylline Leaves.

II.

360 1. Poems occasioned by Political Events, or Feel-

III.

365

ings connected with them:

Christopher Columbus

370 Ode to the departing Year.

521

Lady Griseld Baillie

379 France. An Odo

523

Lord John of the East

Fears in Solitude. Written in April, 1798, dur-

Malcoin's Heir

32

ing the Alarm of an Invasion

524

The Elden Tree

390 Fire, Famine, and Slaughter. A War Eclogue

526

The Ghost of Fadon

392 Recantation, illustrated in the Story of the Mad

A November Night's Traveller

311

526

Sir Maurice. A Ballad

396 II. Love Poems:-

Aldress to a Steam-vessel

Introduction to the Tale of the Dark Ladie 528

To Mrs. Siddons

Lewti, or the Circassian Love-chant

529

A Volunteer Song

The Picture, or the Lover's Resolution

530

To a Child

400 The Nighl-scene. A Dramatic Fragment 531

To an unfortunate Woman, whom the Author

had known in the Days of her innocence 532

BLOOMFIELD.

To an unfortunate Woman at the Theatre 532

Lines composed in a Concert-room

533

I e Farmer's Boy.

The Keepsake

Spring

402

To a Lady. With Falconer's “Shipwreck” 533

Summer

405 Home-sick. Written in Gerinany

331

Autumn

401

Answer to a Child's Question

531

Winter

411 To a Young Lady. On her Recovery from a

Fever

531

The Visionary Hope

531

WORDSWORTH.

Something childish, bui

very

natural. Written

in Germany

535
The Excursion, being a Portion of the Recluse.

Recollections of Love

533

Book | The Wanderer

417 The Happy Husband. A Fragment

535

II. The Sunilary

4:23 On revisiting the Sea shore, ailer lung Absence,
JII. Despondency

under strong medical recommendations not to

IV. Desprindency corrected .

410

bathe

535

V. The Pastor

451

The Composition of a Kiss

536

VI. The Churchyard among the Mountains 439 III. Meditaiive Pums. In Wank verse:

VII. The Churchyard among the Mountains,

Hytno before Sunrise, in the Vale of Chamouny 536

continued .

468 Lines written in the Album at Elbingerude, in

VIII. The Parsonage

476

the Hartz Forest,

537

IX. Discourse of ihe Wanderer, and an Even- On observing a Blossom on the first of February;

ing Visit to the Lake

481

1796

537

The Armenian Lady's Love

409 The Eolian Harp. Composed at Clevedon, So-

The Somnambulist

489

537

Reflections on having left à Plach or Retiremeni 536

To the Rev. George Coleridge of Ollery St. Mary,

BOWLES.

Devon, with some Poems

539

A tombless Epitaph

539

The Missionary.

Inscription for a Fountain on a Heath

540

Canto I.

492 This Lime-tree Bower my Prison

510

II.

495 To a Gentleman. Composed on the Night after

III.

497

his Recitation of a Poem on the Growth of an

IV.

501

individual Mind .

541

V.

503 To a Friend, who had declared his Intention of

VI.

505

writin. no more Poetry

512

VII.

506 The Nightingale: a Conversation Poem. Writ-

VIII.

509 ten in April, 1798.

Song of the Cid

512 Frust at Midnight

513

Sonnets. Written chiefly during various Journeys. To a Friend, together with an unfinished Poem sit

Part I.

The Hour when we shall meet again. Composed

Sonnet. Written at Tynemouth, Northumber-

during Illness and in Ausence

511

land, after a tempestuous Voyage

514 Lines to Joseph Cottle.

511

Sonnet. Al Bamborough Castle

514 IV. Odes and Miscellaneous Poems :-

Sonnet. To the River Wensbeck

514 The Three Graves. A Fragment of a Sexton's

Sonnet. To the River Tweed

515

Tale

515

Sunnet

513 Djection. An Ole'

513

Sonnet. On leaving a Village in Scotland 515 Ode 10 Georgiana, Dutchess of Devonshire, on

Sonnel. To the River Itchin, near Winton 515

the twenty-fourth Stanza in her“ Passage over

Sonnet

515

Mount Gotharil"

Sonnet

. At Dover Cliff's, July 20, 1787

516 Odle w Tranquillity

531

Sonnet. At Ostend, landing, July 21, 1787 . 516 To a Young Friend, on his proposing to domesti.

Sonnet. At Ostend, July 22, 1787

516 cate with the Author. Composed in 1796

031

Sonnet. On the River Rhine

516 Lines 10 W. L. Esq., while he sang a Song to

Sonnet. At a Convent

516

Purcell's Music

552

Sonnet

516 Addressed to a Young Man or Fortune, who

Sonnet

abandoned himself to an indolent and cause.

Sonnet. On a distant View of England

517

less Melancholy :

Sonnet. To the River Cherwell, Oxford

517 Sonnet to the River Otter

Part II

Sonnei. Composed on a Journey homeward;

Sonnet

517 the Author having received Intelligence of the

Sonnet. October, 1792

517 Birth of a Son, September 20, 1796

532

Sonnel. November, 1792

517 Sonnel. To a Friend, who asked how I felt

Sonnel. April, 1793

518 when the Nurse first presented my Infant

Sonnet. May, 1793

518

to me

032

Sunnet. Nelley Abbey

518 The Virgin's Cradle Hynin. Copied from the

Sonnet

518 Print of the Virgin in a Catholic Village in

Sonnet. May, 1793

518 Germany

Sonnet

515 On the Christening of a Friend's

W3

Sonnet

. On revisiting Oxford

518 Epitaph on an Infant

Sonnet. Ou the Death of the Rev. William Ben-

Melancholy. A Fragment

533

well

A Christmas Carol

503

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519

SELECT WORKS

OF THE

BRITISH POETS,

IN

A CHRONOLOGICAL SERIES FROM FALCONER

TO SIR WALTER SCOTT.

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coast of America. Falconer skilfully heightens And, while around his sad companions crowd, this trait by showing its effect on the commisera- He guides the unhappy victim to the shroud. tion of Rodmond, the roughest of his characters,

Hie thee aloft, my gallant friend! he cries; who guides the victim of misfortune to lay hold of

Thy only succour on the mast relies!" the shrouds.

The effect of his sea phrases is to give a definite “A flash, quick glancing on the nerves of light,

and authentic character to his descriptions; and his Struck the pale helmsman with eternal night:

poem has the sensible charm of appearing a tranRodinond, who heard a pitious groan behind, script of reality, and leaves an impression of truth Touch'd with compassion, gaz'd upon the blind; and nature on the mind.

With living colours give my verse to glow,
THE SHIPWRECK.

The sad memorial of a tale of wo?

A scene from dumb oblivion to restore,
CANTO I.

To fame unknown, and new to epic lore!
ARGUMENT.

Alas; neglected by the sacred Nine,

Their suppliant feels no genial ray divine ! Proposal of the subject. Invocation. Apology. Alle. Ah! will they leave Pieriu's happy shore,

gorical description of memory. Appeal to her assist. To plongh the tide where wintry tempests roar ? ance. The story begun. Retrospect of the former

Or shall a youth approach their hallow'd fane, part of the voyage. The ship arrives at Candia. Ancient state of that island. Present state of the Stranger to Phæbus, and the tuneful train?adjacent isles of Greece. The season of the year.

Far from the Muses' academic grove, Character of the master and his officers. Story of 'Twas his the vast and trackless deep to rove. Palemon and Anna. Evening described. Midnight. Alternate change of climates has he known, The ship weighs anchor, and departs from the haven. And felt the fierce extremes of either zone; State of the weather. Morning. Situation of the Where polar skies congeal th' eternal snow, neighbouring shores. Operation of taking the sun's

Or equinoctial suns for ever glow. azimuth. Description of the vessel as seen from the land.

Smote by the freezing or the scorching blast,

A ship-boy on the high and giddy mast,"* The scene is near the city of Candia ; and the time about four days

From regions where Peruvian billows roar, and a half.

To the bleak coast of savage Labrador. While jarring interests wake the world to arms, From where Damascus, pride of Asian plains ! And fright the peaceful vale with dire alarms ; Stoops her proud neck beneath tyrannic chains, While Ocean hears vindictive thunders roll, To where the isthmus,t laved by adverse tides, Along his trembling wave, from pole to pole; Atlantic and Pacific seas divides. Sick of the scene, where war, with ruthless hand, But, while he measured o'er the painful race, Spreads desolation o'er the bleeding land ;

In Fortune's wild illimitable chase, Sick of the tumult, where the trumpet's breath Adversity, companion of his way! Bids ruin smile, and drowns the groan of death!

Suillo'er the victim hung with iron sway ; 'Tis mine, retired beneath this cavern hoar, Bade new distresses every instant grow, That stands all lonely on the sea-beat shore, Marking each change of place with change of wo: Far other themes of deep distress to sing

In regions where th’ Almighty's chastening hand Than ever trembled from the vocal string. With livid pestilence afflicts the land ; No pomp of battle swells th' exalted strain, Or where pale famine blasts the hopeful year, Nor gleaming arms ring dreadful on the plain : Parent of want and misery severe ; But, o'er the scene while pale Remembrance weeps, Or where, all dreadful in th' embattled line, Fate with fell triumph rides upon the deeps,

The hostile ships in flaming combat join : Here hostile elements tumultuous rise,

Where the torn vessel, wind and wave assail, And lawless floods rebel against the skies ; Till o'er her crew distress and death prevail Till hope expires, and peril and dismay

Where'er he wander'd thus vindictive Fate Wave their black ensigns on the watery way. Pursued his weary steps with lasting hate!

Immortal train, who guide the maze of song, Roused by her mandate, storms of black array To whom all science, arts, and arms belong; Winter'd the morn of life's advancing day; Who bid the trumpet of eternal fame

Relax'd the sinews of the living lyre, Exalt the warrior's and the poet's name!

And quench'd the kindling spark of vital fire.If e'er with trembling hope I fondly stray'd Thus while forgotten or unknown he woos, In life's fair morn beneath your hallow'd shade,

What hope to win the coy, reluctant Muse ? To hear the sweetly-mournful lute complain,

Then let not Censure, with malignant joy, And melt the heart with ecstasy of pain ;

The harvest of his humble hope destroy! Or listen, while th' enchanting voice of love,

His verse no laurel wreath attempts to claim, While all Elysium warbled through the grove ;

Nor sculptur'd brass to tell the poet's name. 0! by the hollow blast that moans around,

If terms uncouth, and jarring phrases, wound
That sweeps the wild harp with a plaintive sound ; The softer sense with inharmonious sound,
By the long surge that foams through yonder cave,
Whose vaults remurmur to the roaring wave;

Shakspeare.

Darien.

112-6.32

ADVERTISEMENT.

The following work has been executed with a view of completing the original design of Doctor Aikin, whose volume comprised “a chronological series of the classical poets of Great Britain, from Ben Jonson to Beattie, without mutilation or abridgment, with biographical and critical notices of the authors.” The present volume commences with Falconer and ends with Scott.

In the task of selecting, the compiler has kept in view, accord'ing to the best of his judgment, what appears to have been the leading principle of his predecessor, namely, to choose the most popular works of the best poets. The notices have been necessarily compiled entirely from British authorities.

It is intended to add one more volume to the series, which will commence with Southey, and include the principal works of all the classical poets of Great Britain, subsequent in chronological order to those comprised in the preceding volumes.

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