The New sporting magazine, Volum 10

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Side 211 - That cast an awful look below; Whose ragged walls the ivy creeps, And with her arms from falling keeps: So both a safety from the wind On mutual dependence find. 'Tis now the raven's bleak abode ; 'Tis now the apartment of the toad ; And there the fox securely feeds, And there the poisonous adder breeds, Conceal'd in ruins, moss, and weeds ; While, ever and anon, there falls Huge heaps of hoary mouldered walls.
Side 39 - But to the particular species of excellence men are directed, not by an ascendant planet or predominating humour, but by the first book which they read, some early conversation which they heard, or some accident which excited ardour and emulation. It must at least be allowed that this ruling passion...
Side 348 - Sublime tobacco ! which from east to west Cheers the tar's labour or the Turkman's rest ; Which on the Moslem's ottoman divides His hours, and rivals opium and his brides ; Magnificent in Stamboul, but less grand, Though not less loved, in Wapping or the Strand...
Side 55 - June scarcely one single green feather is to be seen on the head and neck of the bird. By the 6th of July every feather of the former brilliant plumage has...
Side 339 - Honour and shame from no condition rise ; Act well your part, there all the honour lies.
Side 211 - Pliny has, as well as I recollect, compared a river to human life. I have never read the passage in his works, but I have been a hundred times struck with the analogy, particularly amidst mountain scenery. The river, small and clear...
Side 211 - Huge heaps of hoary moulder'd walls. Yet Time has seen, that lifts the low, And level lays the lofty brow, Has seen this broken pile complete, Big with the vanity of state ; But transient is the smile of Fate...
Side 212 - In this, its state of infancy and youth, it may be compared to the human mind in which fancy and strength of imagination are predominant — it is more beautiful than useful. When the different rills or torrents join, and descend into the plain, it becomes slow and stately in its motions ; it is applied to move machinery, to irrigate meadows, and to bear upon its bosom the stately barge; — in this mature state, it is deep, strong, and useful. As it flows on towards the sea, it loses its force and...
Side 33 - WHEN Time, who steals our years away, Shall steal our pleasures too, The memory of the past will stay, And half our joys renew.
Side 348 - Divine in hookas, glorious in a pipe, When tipp'd with amber, mellow, rich, and ripe ; Like other charmers, wooing the caress More dazzlingly when daring in full dress ; Yet thy true lovers more admire by far Thy naked beauties — Give me a cigar...

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