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of it; but no request was made for an | (Ireland) Bill, and the great advisability answer, and no answer was given. of sending it up to the House of Lords

MR. MONTAGUE GUEST: I should in good time, so as not to give that like to ask the hon. Baronet, whether, in House any excuse on that account to his opinion, the French Government are reject it, he will postpone all other justified in following the precedent of Business not of the most urgent nature 1836 ?

in its favour and take it day by day? SIR CHARLES W. DILKE: I can MR. GLADSTONE, in reply, said, he only reply, in the words of the Govern- was sure the hon. Member would not ment on a former occasion—it is never accuse him of want of sympathy if he the custom of the Government to give declined to enter into the Question in answers to hypothetical Questions. detail. He would confine himself to

MR. OTWAY gave Notice that he saying that, as far as the Business of would ask the Secretary to the Admiralty, the Government was concerned, they If he would allow despatches to be attached the highest importance to the placed on the Table which should show progress of the Land Law (Ireland) Bill whether in 1864 the British fleet was being made as expeditiously as it could moved from Malta to the port of Tunis? | be done with due deliberation, and they

would allow nothing but what was absoARTIZANS' AND LABOURERS' DWELL. lutely necessary or of the very simplest

INGS ACTS-ALLEGED REMOVAL OF character to interfere with it.
FAMILIES.

PARLIAMENT-BUSINESS OF THE
MR. A. M. SULLIVAN asked the

HOUSE-PARLIAMENTARY Chairman of the Metropolitan Board of

OATHS BILL. Works, If it is the fact that the Metro

MR. RITCHIE asked, Whether the politan Board of Works, proceeding adjourned debate on the Parliamentary under the Artizans' Dwellings Acts, have Oaths Bill could be taken after 12.30, in given notice of immediate removal to the event of any opposition being offered nearly two hundred families, who are to the Bill ? chiefly dock labourers residing in courts

MR. SPEAKER said, that the Notice lying between Rosemary Lane (Royal of Opposition that had been given Mint Street) and St. Katharine's Docks ; applied only to the Motion of which the and, if he can say whether the new Attorney General had given Notice. dwellings which the Board proposes to The House was now engaged on an erect will be suitable as residences for the Order of the Day, altogether a different same classes as those who are now about matter; and as there was no Notice of being disturbed in the locality specified ? opposition to the Order of the Day, it

SIR JAMES M'GAREL-HOGG, in could come on at any hour. reply, said, that the hon. and learned

MR. A. J. BALFOUR wished for Member was under a misapprehension. a definite expression from the Prime The Metropolitan Board had given no Minister, whether it was on the question such notices as those to which he had of the Morning Sitting, or on this Billy referred; but they had, at the request that he intended to take the feeling of of the Trustees of the Peabody Fund, to the House ? Was it that the Governwhom the adjoining land had been sola ment meant to bring on the question of for the erection of artizans' dwellings, a Morning Sitting the next day, when obtained and furnished the names of the the Order of the Day was read? He persons residing in the locality men- believed it was competent to the Governtioned in the Question, and the Trustees ment to adopt either course. had issued notices to those persons that

MR. GLADSTONE: Sir, there is no their new buildings were ready for occu- intention on the part of the Government pation. The Board erected no dwellings to bring in anything relating to the prothemselves, but only sold or let the land posal of my hon. and learned Friend. for that purpose.

The question of the Morning Sitting

only will be considered to-night. LAND LAW (IRELAND) BILL.

In answer to Mr. ONSLOW,
MR. MACFARLANE asked the Prime MR. SPEAKER said, that the ad-
Minister, Whether, considering the su- journed debate on the Bill could come
preme importance of the Land Law on at any hour.

Sir Charles W. Dilke

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FRANCE-THE COMMERCIAL TREATY ASSASSINATION OF THE EMPEROR
- THE NEW FRENCH GENERAL

OF RUSSIA.
TARIFF.

REPLY TO THE MESSAGE OF CONDOLENCE.
MR. SLAGG asked the Under Secre-

THE MARQUESS OF TAVISTOCK, hav. tary of State for Foreign Affairs, Whe-ing been appointed, together with the Earl ther the present Treaty of Commerce PERCY, to attend upon Her Royal and with France will not expire on Nov. 8; Imperial Highness the Duchess of Edinand what attempt is being made to avoid burgh with a Message of Condolence of delay in fixing its future form ?

this

House, reported that Her Royal and
SiR : ,
Her Majesty's Government have been Imperial Highness had been pleased to

reply:
officially informed that the new French

Clarence House,
General Tariff was promulgated yester-

St. James's, S.W.
day, and accordingly, in pursuance of My Lords,
the Declaration signed on the 10th of I beg that you will have the goodness to
October, 1879, the Commercial Treaties convey to the House of Commons the assurance of
and Conventions between Great Britain my deep gratitude for the Message of Condolence
and France now in force will expire on which it has sent to me, and of which you have
the 8th of November next. To avoid been the bearers.
the delay referred to by the hon. Mem-

The feeling to which the House has given exo ber, I beg to state that Her Majesty's pression, on the subject of the death of my beloved Government urged on the 18th of June, father, has been to me and to the other members of 5th of August, 12th of October, 15th

my family a source of the greatest consolation. of November, 15th of February, and

MARIE. several times in March and April last, that negotiations should be entered upon;

ORDERS OF THE DAY. but the French Government replied that they could not proceed until the Bill for establishing the new General Tariff had MONUMENT TO THE EARL OF been passed by the Senate. When the

BEACONSFIELD, K.G. discussion in the Senate was approaching

COMMITTEE.
its conclusion, Her Majesty's Govern- Considered in Committee.
ment asked that, in order to avoid delay,

(In the Committee.)
some person should be sent to London
to furnish preliminary explanations on

MR. GLADSTONE, in rising to move
questions of detail. The French Go- the following Resolution :-
vernment, however, preferred to give

“That an humble Address be presented to them in Paris, and Mr. Kennedy was

Her Majesty, praying that Her Majesty will give

directions that a Monument be erected in the accordingly sent there for the purpose. Collegiate Church of Saint Peter, Westminster, It will thus be seen that there has been to the Memory of the late Right Hon. the Earí in the past no delay on the part of Her of Beaconsfield, with an Inscription expressive Majesty's Government. I would add of the high sense entertained by the House of that in the official notification from the his rare and splendid gifts, and of his devoted French Government to which I have re- State; and to assure Her Majesty that this

labours in Parliament and in great Offices of ferred, no proposal with respect to formal House will make good the expenses attending negotiations is made by that Govern- | the same,' ment. This point will not be lost sight said: Sir, considering the Notice that of in the answer which will be returned appears, in conjunction with my own, to M. Challemel-Lacour.

upon the Paper, I should, perhaps, be MR. BOURKE asked, whether in the too sanguine were I to express even the negotiations any hope had been held out faintest hope that this Motion might of changes beneficial to the commerce of receive the unanimous assent of the this country?

Committee. But, Sir, while I do not Sir CHARLES W. DILKE said, venture to press that hope, I do entertain that such hopes had been held out, the very earnest hope I would even say and that he hoped the French Govern. I offer the most earnest entreaty—that it ment woull be prepared to make such may not be made a subject of lengthened changes.

or contentious debate. I say that, Sir, in the position of one especially bound

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of it; but no request was made for an | (Ireland) Bill, and the great advisability answer, and no answer was given. of sending it up to the House of Lords

MR. MONTAGUE GUEST: I should in good time, so as not to give that like to ask the hon. Baronet, whether, in House any excuse on that account to his opinion, the French Government are reject it, he will postpone all other justified in following the precedent of Business not of the most urgent nature 1836?

in its favour and take it day by day? SIR CHARLES W. DILKE: I can MR. GLADSTONE, in reply, said, he only reply, in the words of the Govern- was sure the hon. Member would not ment on a former occasion—it is never accuse him of want of sympathy if he the custom of the Government to give declined to enter into the Question in answers to hypothetical Questions. detail. He would confine himself to

MR. OTWAY gave Notice that he saying that, as far as the Business of would ask the Secretary to the Admiralty, the Government was concerned, they If he would allow despatches to be attached the highest importance to the placed on the Table which should show progress of the Land Law (Ireland) Bill whether in 1864 the itish fleet was being made as expeditiously as it could moved from Malta to the port of Tunis? be done with due deliberation, and they

would allow nothing but what was absoARTIZANS' AND LABOURERS' DWELL. lutely necessary or of the very simplest

character to interfere with it. INGS ACTS-ALLEGED REMOVAL OF FAMILIES.

PARLIAMENT-BUSINESS OF THE MR. A. M. SULLIVAN asked the HOUSE_PARLIAMENTARY Chairman of the Metropolitan Board of

OATHS BILL. Works, If it is the fact that the Metro. MR. RITCHIE asked, Whether the politan Board of Works, proceeding adjourned debate on the Parliamentary under the Artizans' Dwellings Acts, have Oaths Bill could be taken after 12.30, in given notice of immediate removal to the event of any opposition being offered nearly two hundred families, who are to the Bill? chiefly dock labourers residing in courts Mr. SPEAKER said, that the Notice lying between Rosemary Lane (Royal of Opposition that had been given Mint Street) and St. Katharine's Docks; applied only to the Motion of which the and, if he can say whether the new Attorney General had given Notice. dwellings which the Board proposes to The House was now engaged on an erect will be suitable as residences for the Order of the Day, altogether a different same classes as those who are now about matter; and as there was no Notice of being disturbed in the locality specified ? opposition to the Order of the Day, it

SIR JAMES MÄGAREL-HOGG, in could come on at any hour. reply, said, that the hon. and learned MR. A. J. BALFOUR wished for Member was under a misapprehension. a definite expression from the Prime The Metropolitan Board had given no Minister, whether it was on the question such notices as those to which he had of the Morning Sitting, or on this Bill, referred; but they had, at the request that he intended to take the feeling of of the Trustees of the Peabody Fund, to the House ? Was it that the Governwhom the adjoining land had been sold ment meant to bring on the question of for the erection of artizans' dwellings, a Morning Sitting the next day, when obtained and furnished the names of the the Order of the Day was read ? He persons residing in the locality men- believed it was competent to the Governtioned in the Question, and the Trustees ment to adopt either course. had issued notices to those persons that MR. GLADSTONE: Sir, there is no their new buildings were ready for occu- intention on the part of the Government pation. The Board erected no dwellings to bring in anything relating to the prothemselves, but only sold or let the land posal of my hon. and learned Friend. for that purpose.

The question of the Morning Sitting

only will be considered to-night. LAND LAW (IRELAND) BILL.

In answer to Mr. Onslow, MR. MACFARLANE asked the Prime MR. SPEAKER said, that the adMinister, Whether, considering the su- journed debate on the Bill could come preme importance of the Land Law on at any hour.

Sir Charles W. Dilke

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FRANCE-THE COMMERCIAL TREATY ASSASSINATION OF THE EMPEROR - THE NEW FRENCH GENERAL

OF RUSSIA. TARIFF.

REPLY TO THE MESSAGE OF CONDOLENCE. MR. SLAGG asked the Under Secre

THE MARQUESS OF TAVISTOCK, haytary of State for Foreign Affairs, Whe-ing been appointed, togethor with the Earl ther the present Treaty of Commerce Percy, to attend upon Her Royal and with France will not expire on Nov. 8; Imperial Highness the Duchess of Edin. and what attempt is being made to avoid burgh with a Message of Condolence of delay in fixing its future form ?

this House, reported that Her Royal and

: , Her Majesty's Government have been Imperial Highness had been pleased to

reply :officially informed that the new French

Clarence House, General Tariff was promulgated yester

St. James's, S.W. day, and accordingly, in pursuance of My Lords, the Declaration signed on the 10th of I beg that you will have the goodness to October, 1879, the Commercial Treaties convey to the House of Commons the assurance of and Conventions between Great Britain

my deep gratitude for the Message of Condolence and France now in force will expire on which it has sent to me, and of which you have the 8th of November next. To avoid been the bearers. the delay referred to by the hon. Mem

The feeling to which the House has given exo ber, I beg to state that Her Majesty's pression, on the subject of the death of my beloved Government urged on the 18th of June, father, has been to me and to the other members of 5th of August, 12th of October, 15th of November, 15th of February, and my family a source of the greatest consolation.

MARIE. several times in March and April last, that negotiations should be entered upon; but the French Government replied that

ORDERS OF THE DAY. they could not proceed until the Bill for establishing the new General Tariff had MONUMENT TO THE EARL OF been passed by the Senate. When the

BEACONSFIELD, K.G. discussion in the Senate was approaching

COMMITTEE. its conclusion, Her Majesty's Govern- Considered in Committee. ment asked that, in order to avoid delay,

(In the Committee.) some person should be sent to London to furnish preliminary explanations on

MR. GLADSTONE, in rising to move questions of detail. The French Go the following Resolution :vernment, however, preferred to give

" That an humble Address be presented to them in Paris, and Mr. Kennedy was

Her Majesty, praying that Her Majesty will give

directions that à Monument be erected in the accordingly sent there for the purpose. Collegiate Church of Saint Peter, Westminster, It will thus be seen that there has been to the Memory of the late Right Hon. the Earl in the past no delay on the part of Her of Beaconsfield, with an Inscription expressive Majesty's Government. I would add of the high sense entertained by the House of that in the official notification from the his rare and splendid gifts, and of his devoted

labours in Parliament and in great Offices of French Government to which I have re

State; and to assure Her Majesty that this ferred, no proposal with respect to formal House will make good the expenses attending negotiations is made by that Govern- the same,” ment. This point will not be lost sight said: Sir, considering the Notice that of in the answer which will be returned appears, in conjunction with my own, to M. Challemel-Lacour.

upon the Paper, I should, perhaps, be MR. BOURKE asked, whether in the too sanguine were I to express even the negotiations any hope had been held out faintest hope that this Notion might of changes beneficial to the commerce of receive the unanimous assent of the this country?

Committee. But, Sir, while I do not Sir CHARLES W. DILKE said, venture to press that hopo, I do entertain that such hopes had been held out, ' the very earnest hope I would even say and that he hoped the French Govern. I offer the most earnest entreaty—that it mont wou'l be prepared to make such may not be made a subject of lengthened changes.

or contentious debate. I say that, Sir, in the position of ono especially bound

em

to consider what is for the dignity of crisis of the Anti-Corn Law movement the House ; but I say it also in the cha- which had brought them together, but racter of an old and keen opponent of to the long struggles of 30 years before ; Lord Beaconsfield ; and nothing would and Lord John Russell said, in very bebe so painful to me, except, indeed, the coming language—“I will not enter into rejection of the Motion, which I think the nature of the measures with which impossible, as that its grace should be his name is associated;" and, againentirely marred by its being made the “This is not the time to consider parsubject of angry disputation. It has not ticular opinions or particular measures." been unnatural that on a subject of this But he also quoted an earlier case, in kind, exciting so much and such varied which it happened that Colonel Barré public interest, criticism should have proposed a public monument to Lord been busy. But with regard to that Chatham, to whom he had been not very criticism, both with respect to what has long before in the sharpest opposition. been done and with respect to what has so that although the features of this not been done, I will simply say that case are marked features, yet we are not my object has been the fulfilment of my without guidance from the proceedings duty, and that the fulfilment of my duty of those who have gone before us. This has appeared to me to lie in a careful I will venture to say, that it is a case consideration of the rules and pre- with regard to which we who may be cedents applicable to the case. I think said to form the majority in this House that those precedents ought to be li- ought to be on our guard against giving berally interpreted ; but, for my own way to our own narrower political sympapart, in all these complimentary mat. thies. It would be better that propositers I have a great jealousy of addi- tions of this kind should be altogether tions. There is a temptation, under abandoned and forgotten than that they the influence of feeling, to make such should degenerate into occasions for issuadditions, and every addition made on ing the manifestoes of political alliances a particular occasion becomes an or of ordinary partizanship. If I am barrassment on the next occasion. I asked why, endeavouring to look withwill simply say, not that I have inter-out fear or favour at this case upon its preted precedent aright—I do not as merits and upon nothing else, and desume that-but I have endeavoured, sirous to speak the truth without constrictly and carefully, to make it my straint and without exaggeration, I venground. Everyone will feel that this is ture to recommend this proposition to not the occasion to attempt an historical the House, and why I think that the portraiture of Lord Beaconsfield. Nei- same reasons which have led the House ther is it the occasion to attempt, espe- to give in the case of other Prime cially from this side of the House-but Ministers of this country a testimony from no side of the House, I will ven- such as I now invite to the memory of ture to say, is it the occasion to attempt Lord Beaconsfield should actuate us now, a political eulogy of Lord Beaconsfield. I say that, in my judgment, we have to It would be mistaking the purposes for look to two questions, and to two queswhich we have met to-day. I will go a tions only; and they are, whether the little further and say that the position tribute that it is proposed to pay is of the House is in some respects and in to be paid to one who, in the first part peculiar. I do not know that it place, has sustained a great historic part has ever happened that a Parliament in and done great deeds written on the sharp antagonism to the policy of a par- page of Parliamentary and National histicular Minister has been called upon to tory; and next, whether those deeds have accept a proposal of this kind with re- been done with the full authority of the spect to the Minister whose policy is op- constituted organs of the nation and of posed. At the same time, though there the nation itself; and I think that an imis no case exactly analagous to this, partial survey of what has happened there are cases which make a material will satisfy the House that upon neither approximation to it. When Lord John of these points is there the smallest Russell proposed, in 1850, in a speech room for doubt. It may seem to be a of great good taste, a monument to the sharp mental transition for us to make, memory of Sir Robert Peel, he very when we pass from the balance of poli. naturally looked back, not merely to the tical opinion now prevailing in this

Mr. Gladstone

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