From Milton to Johnson

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Side 26 - WHY so pale and wan, fond lover? Prithee, why so pale? Will, when looking well can't move her, Looking ill prevail? Prithee, why so pale?
Side 28 - Enlarged winds, that curl the flood, Know no such liberty. Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Side 153 - He cast (of which we rather boast) The gospel's pearl upon our coast, And in these rocks for us did frame A temple, where to sound His name. Oh, let our voice His praise exalt Till it arrive at Heaven's vault, Which then perhaps rebounding may Echo beyond the Mexique bay.
Side 334 - Is not a patron, my Lord, one who looks with unconcern on a man struggling for life in the water, and, when he has reached ground, encumbers him with help ? The notice which you have been pleased to take of my labours, had it been early, had been kind: but it has been delayed till I am indifferent, and cannot enjoy it; till I am solitary, and cannot impart it; till I am known, and do not want it.
Side 334 - Seven years, My Lord, have now passed since I waited in your outward rooms or was repulsed from your door, during which time I have been pushing on my work through difficulties of which it is useless to complain, and have brought it at last to the verge of publication without one act of assistance, one word of encouragement, or one smile of favour. Such treatment I did not expect, for I never had a patron before.
Side 295 - The noisy geese that gabbled o'er the pool, The playful children just let loose from school ; The watch-dog's voice that bayed the whispering wind, And the loud laugh that spoke the vacant mind, — These all in sweet confusion sought the shade, And filled each pause the nightingale had made.
Side 33 - For Books are not absolutely dead things, but do contain a potency of life in them to be as active as that soul was whose progeny they are ; nay they do preserve as in a vial the purest efficacy and extraction of that living intellect that bred them.
Side 153 - Apples plants of such a price, No Tree could ever bear them twice. With Cedars chosen by his hand, From Lebanon he stores the Land. And makes the hollow Seas, that roar, Proclaim the Ambergris on shore.
Side 57 - NATURE hath made men so equal in the faculties of body and mind as that, though there be found one man sometimes manifestly stronger in body or of quicker mind than another, yet when all is reckoned together the difference between man and man is not so considerable as that one man can thereupon claim to himself any benefit to which another may not pretend as well as he.
Side 148 - DIM as the borrow'd beams of moon and stars To lonely, weary, wandering travellers, Is Reason to the soul : and as on high. Those rolling fires discover but the sky, Not light us here ; so Reason's glimmering ray Was lent, not to assure our doubtful way, But guide us upward to a better day. And as those nightly tapers disappear, When day's bright lord ascends our hemisphere ; So pale grows Reason at Religion's sight ; 10 So dies, and so dissolves in supernatural light.

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