The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volum 3

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T. Cadell jun. and W. Davies, 1802
 

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Side 328 - Son, by whom all things were made,48 had been begotten before all worlds, and the longest of the astronomical periods could be compared only as a fleeting moment to the extent of his duration; yet this duration was not infinite,49 and there had been a time which preceded the ineffable generation of the Logos.
Side 245 - The two emperors proclaim to the world that they have granted a free and absolute power to the Christians, and to all others, of following the religion which each individual thinks proper to prefer, to which he has addicted his mind, and which he may deem the best adapted to his own use.
Side 104 - A mind thus relaxed by prosperity and indulgence, was incapable of rising to that magnanimity which disdains suspicion, and dares to forgive. The deaths of Maximian and Licinius may perhaps be...
Side 101 - ... foes of the republic. He loved glory as the reward, perhaps as the motive, of his labours.
Side 336 - equally deplorable and dangerous, that there are as many creeds as opinions among men, as many doctrines as inclinations, and as many sources of blasphemy as there are faults among us ; because we make creeds arbitrarily, and explain them as arbitrarily. The Homoousion is rejected, and received, and explained away by successive synods.
Side 101 - In the despatch of business his diligence was indefatigable ; and the active powers of his mind were almost continually exercised in reading, writing, or meditating, in giving audience to ambassadors, and in examining the complaints of his subjects.
Side 243 - ... to point him out as the patron of a young hero. The altars of Apollo were crowned with the votive offerings of Constantine ; and the credulous multitude were taught to believe that the emperor was permitted to behold with mortal eyes the visible majesty of their tutelar deity ; and that, either waking or in a vision, he was blessed with the auspicious omens of a long and victorious reign.
Side 275 - Crispus the emperor could no longer hesitate in the choice of a religion ; he could no longer be ignorant that the church was possessed of an infallible remedy, though he chose to defer the application of it till the approach of death had removed the temptation and danger of a relapse.
Side 274 - Constantine forfeited the reputation which he had acquired in his youth. As he gradually advanced in the knowledge of truth, he proportionably declined in the practice of virtue ; and the same year of his reign in which he convened the council of Nice was polluted by the execution, or rather murder, of his eldest son.
Side 13 - But, when the passages of the Straits were thrown open for trade, they alternately admitted the natural and artificial riches of the north and south, of the Euxine, and of the Mediterranean. Whatever rude commodities were collected in the forests of Germany and Scythia...

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