Spirit of the English Magazines, Volum 14

Forside
Munroe and Francis, 1824
 

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Innhold

Del 9
129
Del 10
144
Del 11
169
Del 12
209
Del 13
220
Del 14
225
Del 15
235
Del 16
249
Del 25
385
Del 26
409
Del 27
413
Del 28
415
Del 29
417
Del 30
449
Del 31
456

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Populære avsnitt

Side 100 - And ever against eating cares Lap me in soft Lydian airs Married to immortal verse, Such as the meeting soul may pierce In notes, with many a winding bout Of linked sweetness long drawn out, With wanton heed and giddy cunning, The melting voice through mazes running, Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony; That Orpheus...
Side 102 - ALL worldly shapes shall melt in gloom, The Sun himself must die, Before this mortal shall assume Its immortality ! I saw a vision in my sleep, That gave my spirit strength to sweep Adown the gulf of Time ! I saw the last of human mould That shall Creation's death behold, As Adam saw her prime...
Side 103 - ... curtain fall Upon the stage of men. Nor with thy rising beams recall Life's tragedy again: Its piteous pageants bring not back, Nor waken flesh, upon the rack Of pain anew to writhe; Stretched in disease's shapes abhorred, Or mown in battle by the sword, Like grass beneath the scythe.
Side 102 - The Sun's eye had a sickly glare, The Earth with age was wan. The skeletons of nations were Around that lonely man ! Some had expired in fight, — the brands Still rusted in their bony hands ; In plague and famine some ! Earth's cities had no sound nor tread And ships were drifting with the dead To shores where all was dumb...
Side 209 - one half of the world does not know how the other half lives.
Side 166 - Inquireth if you have had your arms done on vellum yet; and did not know, till lately, that such-and-such had been the crest of the family. His memory is unseasonable; his compliments perverse; his talk a trouble; his stay pertinacious; and when he goeth away, you dismiss his chair into a corner as precipitately as possible, and feel fairly rid of two nuisances.
Side 103 - What though beneath thee man put forth His pomp, his pride, his skill ; And arts that made fire, flood, and earth, The vassals of his will ; — Yet mourn I not thy parted sway, Thou dim discrowned king of day...
Side 166 - He may require to be repressed sometimes — aliquando sufflaminandus erat — but there is no raising her. You send her soup at dinner, and she begs to be helped — after the gentlemen. Mr. requests the honour of taking wine with her; she hesitates between Port and Madeira, and chooses the former — because he does. She calls the servant Sir; and insists on not troubling him to hold her plate.
Side 43 - Sublime tobacco ! which from east to west Cheers the tar's labour or the Turkman's rest ; Which on the Moslem's ottoman divides His hours, and rivals opium and his brides...
Side 62 - If you pour a glut of water upon a bottle, it receives little of it; but with a funnel, and by degrees, you shall fill many of them, and spill little of your own; to their capacity they will all receive, and be full.

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