A Text-book in Citizenship: Community Civics, Economic Civics, Vocational Civics

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Allyn and Bacon, 1923 - 748 sider
 

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Innhold

General Features op Our Government
16
SOCIAL INSTITUTIONS CHAPTER III
19
Places Where People Live
20
The Ideal Home
22
Homes of Earlier Days and Now
24
Influences That Break Up the Home
25
Who Is to Blame?
27
Making Homes Better
28
Preparing for HomeMaking
30
CHAPTER IV
33
Why Do We Have Public Schools?
34
How Ora Schools Are Organized
36
The People Who Administer the Schools
38
The Pupils of the School
40
The Schools and the Public
42
The Schoolhwijse 4 Red and Otherwise
44
The Course is Stvby
47
_ Private Schools
50
21 JoLLepEgAND UNJVERS tflES
51
CHAPTER V
55
Laws Relating to Religious Belief
57
Promoting Our Religious Life
60
Differences among Churches
64
Friendliness among Churches
65
Making Churches Most Useful
68
CHAPTER VI
71
How Communities Grow
74
A Rural Community
76
A Small Town
78
City Life and Its Problems
81
Community Spirit
82
CHAPTER VII
86
The People of the United States
89
The First Americans
90
Later Americans
91
Why the Foreigner Comes
92
Problems That He Raises
95
Putting Up the Bars
97
Granting Citizenship
99
4H Making Americans
102
The Yellow Man in Our Country
104
Red Men and Black Men
107
Higher Races and Lower
110
HELPFUL CONDITIONS IN SOCIAL LIFE
114
Ways of Becoming Intelligent
115
Libraries
117
Newspapers and Magazines
120
Intelligence through Culture
122
CHAPTER IX
126
Peoples Attitude toward Disease
127
Health and Our Surroundings
128
Why Governments Must Look after Our Health
129
Elements Necessary to Health
132
Securing Pure Air
133
Providing Pure Water
134
Obtaining Pure Food
136
Disposing of Wastes
140
Caring for the Sick
142
Caring for the Defective
144
Restraining Bad Habits
146
Keeping in Health
149
CHAPTER X
153
What We Burn Up
155
Fire Fighting
156
Fire Prevention
159
Why We Have Policemen
162
Organizing the Police Force
164
How a State Protects Life and Property
167
The National Government as a Protection
169
Why People Do Wrong
171
Dealing with WrongDoers 174
174
Caring for Young Criminals
180
CHAPTER XI
184
The Home Beautiful
185
The City Beautiful
187
Keeping a Community Clean
193
Zoning
197
State and National Parks
200
CHAPTER XII
203
Constructing Streets and Highways
208
Roads and the Farmer
214
Old and Nbw Ways of Getting There
218
The Story of the Railroad
223
The Story of the Post Office
226
Traveling by Water
229
Electricity in Transportation
233
Other Means of Communication
238
The Prospects of the Future
240
CHAPTER XIII
245
How Standards Diffbr
247
Essentials and NonEssentials
248
Why Some People Are Poor
252
Charity Wise and Unwise
255
Preventing Poverty
258
Why Recreation Is Needed
260
Public Provision for Recreation
262
Private Amusement Enterprises
266
CHAPTER XIV
269
Handicaps to Overcome
271
Kinds of Cooperation
272
How a Crowd Acts
274
The Value op Leaders
275
Forming Public Opinion
277
Examples of Community Cooperation
281
Cooperation among Nations
284
EARNING A LIVING WORK AND WORKERS CHAPTER XV
287
Stages in Industrial Development
289
The Way Men Work
293
What Men Do
297
CHAPTER XVI
300
Deciding on a Vocation
302
Training for a Trade
305
Training for a Profession
308
Finding a Job
310
Keeping Up with the Job
311
The Girl and Her Life Work
313
CHAPTER XVII
318
Increasing Ones Income
320
Savings
323
Family and Personal Budgets
324
False Economy
325
Wise Economy Thrift
327
Investments Wise and Otherwise
329
Protecting the Unwary
331
The Responsibility of the Successful
332
CHAPTER XVIII
337
The Services of Land and Natural Resources
338
Private Ownership of Land
340
Methods of Cultivating Land
344
The Waste of Natural Resources
346
Conserving Natures Gifts
348
Labor and Its Services
353
Capital and Its Importance
356
Phases of Economic Interest
357
Keeping Labor Employed
361
ORGANIZING BUSINESS
362
CHAPTER XIX
366
The Corporation
367
The Trust
368
Producing Goods on a Large Scale
369
Factories and Their Effects
372
Financing Great Industries
373
Management and Business Efficiency
377
Farming Old and New
382
CONVENIENCES OF TRADE CHAPTER XXI
408
What Money Does for Us
410
Materials That Are Good for Money
412
Money the World Over
414
Good Money and Poor Money
415
The Money of the United States
419
CHAPTER XXII
424
Value of Credit
425
Safeguarding the Use of Credit
427
Hard Times
428
Keeping Ones Word in Business
430
CHAPTER XXIII
433
How Banks Safeguard Their Business
435
The Federal Reserve System
438
Banks for Farmers
439
CHAPTER XXIV
442
Why Nations Trade
443
Difficulties in Foreign Trade
445
Paying for Foreign Goods
446
Protective Tariffs and Their Effect
449
Carrying Goods in Foreign Trade
451
WORKERS AND EMPLOYERS CHAPTER XXV
454
Why Misunderstanding Occurs
456
Grievances op the Workers
458
Unions and Their Purposes
461
Methods of Unions
463
How Employers Look Out for Themselves
466
The Better Way
467
Employers of the Right Sort
470
Industrial Democracy
475
CHAPTER XXVI
479
Can the Government Help?
480
Arbitration Why?
481
The Rights of the People
482
CHAPTER XXVII
486
Right Conditions of Work
488
Social Insurance
491
Problems of Child Workers
493
Problems of Women Workers
496
CHAPTER XXVIII
500
The Government and Public Utilities
502
Government Ownership and Operation
503
What the Socialist Wants
506
Those Who Would Overturn Things
508
How Better Times Come
511
EXECUTING THE PEOPLES WILL SOME FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES CHAPTER XXIX
514
The Beginnings op Government
516
Forms op Government Today
517
What Our Governments Do por Us
521
The Great States op the World
523
The Progress of Democracy
525
CHAPTER XXX
528
Government in Colonial Days
529
Our Constitution
530
Changes in Our Constitution
532
Should We Have a Cabinet System?
534
The Making op States
536
The States and the Union
537
The States and Each Other
541
CHAPTER XXXI
546
How Parties Are Managed
548
Nominating Candidates
551
Holding Elections
555
Who May Vote?
557
Ballots
559
Finding the Peoples Opinion
562
CHAPTER XXXII
566
The Composition of LawMaking Bodies
567
The House op Representatives
568
The Senate
570
General Facts about Congress
572
Steps in Enacting a Law
575
Laws That Congress May Pass
578
Poor Kinds op Laws
579
Setting Laws Aside
580
CHAPTER XXXIII
584
The Men Who Hold the Office
585
The Presidents Election
588
What the President Does
590
CHAPTER XXXIV
593
Duties of the Departments
595
Special Commissions
600
Selecting Officials in the Civil Service
602
Removing Public Officers
603
Problems of Law Enforcement
604
CHAPTER XXXV
608
How Our National Courts Are Organized
610
Judges and Their Importance
612
The Power of Our Courts
613
CHAPTER XXXVI
616
Differences That May Arisf
617
Foreign Representatives
619
Treaties and Their Making
621
Ways of Settling Disputes
622
War Its Causes and Effects
624
Famous International Conferences
626
Our Foreign Policy Old and New
628
The League of Nations
629
CHAPTER XXXVII
633
State Constitutions
634
LawMakers for the States
635
State Governors and Administrators 036
636
State Courts
638
Special Problems for the States
639
CHAPTER XXXVIII
642
Types of Local Governments
643
Counties and Their Officers 044
644
Laying Out Towns and Townships 047
647
Governing New England Towns 048
648
Township Government Elsewhere
650
Boroughs and Villages 051
651
CHAPTER XXXIX
654
The Most Common Forms of City Government
655
Plans for Reform in City Government 058
658
Why City Government Is Difficult 059
659
What Cities Attempt to Do for Their People 061
661
CHAPTER XL
664
The District of Columbia
666
Protectorates
668
CHAPTER XLI
672
How Our Governments Meet Their Financial Needs
673
What We Have a Right to Ask about Taxes
675
Public Budgets 677
677
Borrowing and Repaying
680
Problems of National Finance
681
Problems of State Finances
684
Problems of Local Finance
686
Levying and Collecting Taxes
687
Proposed Tax Reforms
689
CHAPTER XLII
693
Guarantees of Security
694
Guarantees of Liberty
695
Guarantees of Property
696
How the Courts Conduct Their Business
698
The Duty of Loyalty
701
The Duty of Support
703
The Duty of Service
705
America Means Opportunity
707
Government of the People by the People and for the people
708
Appendix A The Constitution op the United States
711
Appendix B Some Common Customs in Parliamentary
730
Reference Books for Teacher and Pupil
737
Index
743
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Side 720 - ... 3. The trial of all crimes, except in cases of impeachment, shall be by jury; and such trial shall be held in the state where the said crimes shall have been committed; but when not committed within any state, the trial shall be at such place or places as the congress may by law have directed.
Side 721 - New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union ; but no new State shall be formed or erected within the jurisdiction of any other State ; nor any State be formed by the junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the consent of the legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress.
Side 717 - ... 2. No State shall, without the consent of the Congress, lay any imposts or duties on imports or exports, except what may be absolutely necessary for executing its inspection laws ; and the net produce of all duties and imposts^ laid by any State on imports or exports, shall be for the...
Side 726 - ... on the list the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States.
Side 719 - United States, whose appointments are not herein otherwise provided for, and which shall be established by law ; but the Congress may by law vest the appointment of such inferior officers, as they think proper, in the President alone, in the courts of law, or in the heads of departments.
Side 719 - President shall, at stated times, receive for his services a compensation, which shall neither be increased nor diminished during the period for which he shall have been elected, and he shall not receive within that period any other emolument from the United States, or any of them. 8. Before he enter on the execution of his office, he shall take the following oath or affirmation : " I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will,...
Side 716 - ... 2 The privilege of the writ of habeas corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in cases of rebellion or invasion the public safety may require it. 3 No bill of attainder or ex post facto law shall be passed. 4 No capitation, or other direct tax, shall be laid, unless in proportion to the census or enumeration herein before directed to be taken.
Side 720 - State, between citizens of different States, between citizens of the same State claiming lands under grants of different States, and between a State, or the citizens thereof, and foreign States, citizens, or subjects.
Side 721 - Treason against the United States shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort. No person shall be convicted of treason unless on the testimony of two witnesses to the same overt act, or on confession in open court.
Side 716 - No preference shall be given by any regulation of commerce or revenue to the ports of one state over those of another: nor shall vessels bound to, or from one state, be obliged to enter, clear, or pay duties in another.

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