Retrospect of Western Travel, Volum 3

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Saunders and Otley, 1838 - 293 sider
 

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Side 237 - I ask not for the great, the remote, the romantic; what is doing in Italy or Arabia; what is Greek art, or Provencal minstrelsy; I embrace the common, I explore and sit at the feet of the familiar, the low.
Side 234 - The office of the scholar is to cheer, to raise, and to guide men by showing them facts amidst appearances.
Side 235 - For the ease and pleasure of treading the old road, accepting the fashions, the education, the religion of society...
Side 25 - It is therefore ordered, That every township in this jurisdiction, after the Lord hath increased them to the number of fifty householders, shall then forthwith appoint one within their town to teach all such children as shall resort to him to write and read...
Side 236 - These being his functions, it becomes him to feel all confidence in himself, and to defer never to the popular cry. He and he only knows the world. The world of any moment is the merest appearance. Some great decorum, some fetish of a government, some ephemeral trade, or war, or man, is cried up by half mankind and cried down by the other half, as if all depended on this particular up or down. The odds are that the whole question is not worth the poorest thought which the scholar has lost in listening...
Side 25 - That the selectmen of every town in the several precincts and quarters where they dwell, shall have a vigilant eye over their brethren and neighbors, to see, first, that none of them shall suffer so much barbarism in any of their families, as not to endeavor to teach by themselves or others, their children and apprentices so much learning, as may enable them perfectly to read the English tongue...
Side 238 - Every thing that tends to insulate the individual, - to surround him with barriers of natural respect, so that each man shall feel the world is his, and man shall treat with man as a sovereign state with a sovereign state; tends to true union as well as greatness. "I learned...
Side 8 - Then did the rebels try their best our soldiers to surround, But they could not accomplish it, because there was a pond, To which our men retreated, and covered all the rear, The rogues were...
Side 234 - I hear therefore with joy whatever is beginning to be said of the dignity and necessity of labor to every citizen. There is virtue yet in the hoe and the spade, for learned as well as for unlearned hands.
Side 238 - If there be one lesson more than another which should pierce his ear, it is, The world is nothing, the man is all; in yourself is the law of all nature, and you know not yet how a globule of sap ascends...

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