Eustace Conway, Or, The Brother and Sister: A Novel, Volum 2

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Side 103 - A perfect Woman, nobly planned, To warn, to comfort, and command ; And yet a Spirit still, and bright With something of an angel 13 light. XV.— I WANDERED LONELY. 1804. I WANDERED lonely as a cloud...
Side 74 - As meant to indicate a God to man, Gives him his praise, and forfeits not her own. Learning has borne such fruit in other days On all her branches; piety has found Friends in the friends of science, and true prayer Has flowed from lips wet with Castalian dews.
Side 80 - ... a supply of good ordinary men is to attempt nothing higher. I know that nine-tenths of those whom the University sends out must be hewers of •wood and drawers of water ; but, if I train the ten-tenths to be so, depend upon it the wood will be badly cut, the water will be spilt.
Side 247 - More like a grave reality: Thou art to me but as a wave Of the wild sea : and I would have Some claim upon thee, if I could, Though but of common neighbourhood. What joy to hear thee, and to see ! Thy elder brother I would be, Thy father, anything to thee.
Side 247 - Adopt your homely ways, and dress, A Shepherd, thou a Shepherdess ! But I could frame a wish for thee More like a grave reality: Thou art to me but as a wave Of the wild sea; and I would have Some claim upon thee, if I could, Though but of common neighbourhood. What joy to hear thee, and...
Side 162 - That other does not liberty constrain, But man may either act, or may refrain. Heaven made us agents free to good or ill, And forced it not, though he foresaw the will.
Side 150 - Yet cousin, Even from the bottom of these miseries, From all that fortune can inflict upon us, I see two comforts rising, two mere blessings, If the gods please to hold here ; a brave patience, And the enjoying of our griefs together.
Side 26 - Oh, most noble sir, Though I have lost my fortune, and lost you For a worthy father, yet I will not lose My former virtue ; my integrity Shall not yet forsake me : But as the wild ivy Spreads and thrives better in some piteous ruin Of tower, or defaced temple, than it does Planted by a new building, so shall I Make my adversity my instrument To wind me up into a full content.
Side 188 - Faith evermore looks upwards and descries Objects remote ; but reason can discover Things only near — sees nothing that's above her : They are not matches— often disagree, And sometimes both are clos'd, and neither see.
Side 26 - I have lost my fortune, and lost you For a worthy father, yet I will not lose My former virtue ; my integrity Shall not yet forsake me : but, as the wild ivy Spreads and thrives better in some piteous ruin Of tower or defac'd temple than it does Planted by a new building, so shall I Make my adversity my instrument To wind me up into a full content. Alb. 'Tis worthily resolved. Our first adventure Is to stop the marriage : for thy other losses, Practised by a woman's malice, but account them Like...

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