The Political Life of the Right Honourable George Canning: From 1822 to the Period of His Death, in August, 1827. Together with a Short Review of Foreign Affairs Subsequently to that Event, Volum 3

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown and Green, 1831
 

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Side 410 - I called the New World into existence, to redress the balance of the Old.
Side 56 - ... who, incapable of reaching the heights from which alone extended views of human nature can be taken, console and revenge themselves by calumniating and misrepresenting those who have toiled to those heights, for the advantage of mankind.
Side 125 - Greenwich,) the said line shall ascend to the north along the channel called Portland channel, as far as the point of the continent where it strikes the 56th degree of north latitude; from this last-mentioned point, the line of demarcation shall follow the summit of the mountains situated parallel to the coast as far as the point of intersection of the 141st degree of west longitude...
Side 125 - Island, which point lies in the parallel of 54 degrees 40 minutes north latitude, and between the 131st and the 133d degree of west longitude, (meridian of Greenwich,) the said line shall ascend to the north along the channel called Portland channel, as far as the point of the continent where it strikes the 56th degree of north latitude...
Side 386 - At a late period in life the Duke of Wellington wrote to a friend : " I am not in the habit of deciding upon such matters hastily or in anger ; and the proof of this is, that I never had a quarrel with any man in my life!
Side 358 - Grace yesterday the command which I had just received from his Majesty, to add, that, in the present instance, his Majesty does not intend to depart from the usual course of proceeding on such occasions. I am sorry to have delayed some hours this answer to your Grace's letter; but, from the nature of the subject, I did not like to forward it without having previously submitted it (together with your Grace's letter) to his Majesty.
Side 226 - I have said) put up with almost any thing that did not touch national faith and national honor, rather than let slip the furies of war, the leash of which we hold in our hands— not knowing whom they may reach, or how far their ravages may be carried.
Side 225 - It is the contemplation of this new power in any future war which excites my most anxious apprehension. It is one thing to have a giant's strength, but it would be another to use it like a giant. The consciousness of such strength is, undoubtedly, a source of confidence and security ; but in the situation in which this country stands, our business is not to seek opportunities of displaying it, but to content ourselves with letting the professors of violent and exaggerated doctrines on both sides...
Side 226 - ... which this country stands, our business is not to seek opportunities of displaying it, but to content ourselves with letting the professors of violent and exaggerated doctrines on both sides feel, that it is not their interest to convert an umpire into an adversary. The situation of England, amidst the struggle of political opinions which agitates more or less sensibly different countries of the world, may be compared to that of the Ruler of the Winds, as described by the poet: — " Celsa sedet...
Side 56 - These persons seem to imagine that, under no possible circumstances, can an honest man endeavour to keep his country upon a line with the progress of political knowledge, and to adapt its course to the varying circumstances of the world. Such an attempt is branded as an indication of mischievous intentions, as evidence of a design to sap the foundations of the greatness of the country.

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