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manding exhibition of lexicographical ability, publi city of New York. But not a word from then reader has already been put in possession of facts we trust, will easily enable him to divine the reaso gentlemen know better than to commit their re such a hazardous act as recommending such a gentlemen who have ventured to do so, we do hop will seriously reconsider this matter; for it is a than might at first be apprehended. The solid Hebrew literature are at stake in this country. greatly hazarded by such a book. The purchase thus been taken in, will be slow to repair the another and a better purchase. They will natura they may again be deceived.

We have adverted to the fact, that Mr. Roy claims in his Preface, that this work“ is designed act the German Neology of Gesenius.” Mr. Wo “Gesenius' Hebrew Lexicon is a dangerous book the hands of any student of theology, as the auth del, and his opinions are interspersed through ei his work.” This last statement is so utterly grou we are thrown into some perplexity respecting eit! ity or the veracity of Mr. Wolf, and left to a pair tive. We enter upon no contradiction of such an The Lexicon of Gesenius is before the world ; it through the hands of Professor Robinson, who ha least, as little zeal as Mr. Wolf to propagate neol

What progress such a scholar as Mr. Roy c opposing the Coryphæus of Hebrew literature ir cannot be doubtful for a single moment to any int well-informed reader. If we wished for neology we should wish it to have such opponents as Every man in our community, who understands ture of the case, and who wishes that neology make incursions upon our lexicography orth spontaneously say, respecting such a work as Mr.

“ Non tali auxilio, nec defensoribus istis,

Tempus eget.”

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manding exhibition of lexicographical ability

, published in the city of New York. But not a word from them; and the reader has already been put in possession of facts, which

, as we trust, will easily enable bim to divine the reason. These gentlemen know better than to commit their reputation by such a hazardous act as recommending such a book

. The gentlemen who have ventured to do so, we do hope and trust, will seriously reconsider this matter; for it is a than might at first be apprehended. The solid interests of Hebrew literature are at stake in this country. They are greatly hazarded by such a book. The purchasers who have thus been taken in, will be slow to repair the mischiel by another and a better purchase. They will naturally fear that

Some Inquiries in the Province of Kemaon re

Geology and other Branches of Natural Scier Assistant Surgeon John McClelLAND, Membe Royal College of Surgeons in London, &c. 1835. 8vo. pp. 384. With 10 Colored Plates.

graver

one

they may again be deceived.

We have adverted to the fact, that Mr. Roy openly pro-
claims in his Preface, that this work is designed to counter-
act the German Neology of Gesenius.” Mr. Wolf says, that
Gesenius' Hebrew Lexicon is a dangerous book to put into
the hands of

any

student of theology, as the author is an intidel

, and his opinions are interspersed through every page of his work." This last statement is so utterly groundless, that we are thrown into some perplexity respecting either the sanity or the veracity of Mr. Wolf, and left to a painful alternative. We enter upon no contradiction of such an affirmation

. The Lexicon of Gesenius is before the world ; it has passed through the hands of Professor Robinson, who has

, to say the least, as little zeal as Mr. Wolf to propagate neology.

What progress such a scholar as Mr. Roy can make is opposing the Coryphæus of Hebrew literature in Germany, cannot be doubtful for a single moment to any intelligent and well-informed reader. If we wished for neology to triumph, we should wish it to have such opponents as Mr. Roy. Every man in our community, who understands the true nature of the case, and who wishes that neology may never make incursions upon our lexicography or theology

, will spontaneously say, respecting such a work as Mr. Roy's

, Non tali auxilio, nec defensoribus istis,

Tempus eget."

It was always to us a matter of great regret, that we means of knowing any thing certain respecting the struc composition of the famous Himalaya Mountains. Hig tains present admirable facilities for ascertaining the situation and age of the rocky layers which repose up sides; and we justly supposed that the giant Himal opened wide the book of nature, and left its pages for struction of man. At this time, while public attention rope and America is devoted to the interesting su geological research, and the sublime revelations disco tables of stone,' call forth our feelings of admiration light, we cannot fail to rejoice to receive from the mountains of India, such evidence as is now before u wide

spreading of science in that portion of the world. It is surprising, that the British government has never a regular geological survey of its valuable possessions i It would seem, that a country teeming with mines of g diamonds, besides many other more useful minerals have called forth a most minute scrutiny, even were ti thing more to be gained than mere commercial wealth. few instances where the government has patronized the of scientific men, our author observes, that “the motiv been, rather the extension of commerce than the promotio ence; and often so exclusively, as was calculated to rather than to serve, even the mere object in view;' were generally so overloaded and crippled with instructic they were unable to make such explorations as would any account. Such instructions are altogether usele worse than useless ; for the scientific explorer knows b ought to be done, while those who give the instructions know nothing about the country in question, and are w competent to direct a complicated and difficult survey.

The author visited India as an Assistant Surgeon army, and while performing the arduous and responsibl VOL. XLVI. NO. 99.

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of his station, found time also to explore the geology ral history of the country over which his detachmen His observations appear to have been made with ca very numerous and varied. At one time he is on the m with his hammer, examining the rocks and minerals ; 1 him investigating the causes which produce some o liar diseases of the country:

Yet the work is reduc fectly scientific form, and shows correct judgment in ment.

Among the topographical remarks, we observe tha certained the limits of perpetual snow on the Hima tains to be at the altitude of 12,000 feet; and the h of those mountains he estimates at 24,000 feet ab level, thus making it from 1,500 to 2,000 feet lower formerly been reckoned.

It would be interesting to know by exact barometri ments and triangulation, what is the true altitude of tains. It is also very desirable, that some geole ascertain, whether there are any geological proc diluvial waters had ever swept over their summit aware, that those frozen regions would present a mountable obstacles in searching into the evidenc catastrophe; but if it can be ascertained, the fact in well be worth the labor and expense that would be determining its truth. How delightful must it be to ical traveller, to stand on one of these lofty pinna he could take in, at a single view, the conformation ous mountains around, and see at a glance the man they were raised to their present elevation throug incumbent strata !

We beg leave to quote the following passage for 1 the picturesque. Those who have seen the roseat Blanc at sunset, will be reminded of Alpine scener

“ The hour of the day, at which these awfully intere (the Himalaya Mountains) are seen most to advantage, fore sunrise or after sunset, when their soft crimson for relieved from the glowing tints of the sky by the golde play along their varied outlines." -- pp. 29, 30.

“In the infancy of civilization (says Humboldt) were chosen by the people to offer sacrifices to the first altars, the first temples, were erected on mounta author found, that in India, almost every mountain guished by some traditional name, derived from a sa ancient temple, which usually caps their summits. ly the poor Hindoos sacrifice their lives, in attempt some inaccessible summit, where a grotesque form is considered an emblem of the Deity.

We shall not have room, in this short notice, to give the reader an account of the remarkable rocks and curious minerals described in detail by the author. We must content ourselves with the remark, that the mountains described are extremely similar to those of the Tyrolese Alps, and, like those remarkable peaks, consist of a great variety of stratified and unstratified rocks, such as gneiss, talcose, mica, slates, hornblende, rockgreenstone-trap, granite, dolomite, and various limestones. The formations called primary, transition, secondary, tertiary, and alluvial, are all distinctly recognized in the descriptions before us.

The dolomite mountains are the most remarkable, and, like those of the Tyrol, consist of lofty cones and precipitous masses of a white granular kind of magnesian limestone, which rise to a considerable elevation, and present escarpments that defy the feet of the mountaineer, and do not even support a sufficiency of soil to nourish vegetation.

Rocks of an ancient igneous origin evidently abound; but no recent volcanoes are described as occurring among the Himalayas. A few mines of copper and iron were visited by our author, who found cause severely to censure the system of tyrannical abuse practised by the native contractors or Teekedars and the owners of slaves. It seems, that the method of mining practised in obtaining copper ores, is such, that only a very low and narrow drift, called by miners a creep, is opened, which is merely wide enough to admit the body of a man. Into these low, dark, and muddy excavations, troops of children are driven, and are forced to labor during their whole lives in carrying out bags of the ore.

“ At two of the mines there are from thirty to fifty children, under the age of twelve years, thus employed, without the hope of release during the period of their natural lives; but, if incapable of farther employment, they are left perfectly destitute.” — p. 175.

The geological portion of the work closes with an account of numerous Earthquakes, that have taken place in Kemaon. They appear to have been more violent within a few years, no less than eight shocks having taken place between December, 1831, and January, 1835. It is supposed that they are produced by violent subterranean movements of pent up gas or steam,

and that they are the phenomena preceding or accompanying the eruptions of volcanic mountains. No volcanoes occur in the Himalaya chain, although there are abundance of hot springs that burst forth from their sides. The nearest volcanoes are those of the Celestial Mountains, which lie to the North 720 miles distant, and have two cones, one of which is in active eruption, while the other is nearly extinct. The volcanic islands of the China Sea are 1,800 maritime miles distant. Our author is disposed to believe, that the abovementioned earthquakes proceed from the Celestial Mountains, but supposes that the shocks must necessarily augment in intensity as we approach the volcanic region. This is by no means necessary, at least within certain limits. An earthquake is as liable to be violent at a considerable distance from the chimney of its volcanic outlet, as at the very base of the volcano itself. At least such have been the results of our researches in Italy and Sicily.

We have not room to notice the catalogue of animals found in Kemaon, which is appended to this work, nor to enter into an analysis of the very interesting chapter on the causes of Goitre and Cretinism. The author has treated this latter subject in a manner that does him great credit as a medical philosopher; and every physician who reads his observations will at once perceive that there is such a science in nature as Medical Geology. We extract the following brief statement of some of his results.

“The proportion of the inhabitants of each rock, who are affected with Goitre and Cretinism, will stand to the healthy in the following order:

“ Granite and gneiss — Goitre, zbo; Cretins, none. “ Mica-slate and hornblende-slate Goitre, none; Cretins none.

Clay-slate — Goitre, iio; Cretins, none. “ Transition-slate — Goitre, z. ; Cretins, none. « Steatitic sandstone Goitre none; Cretins, none. “ Calcareous rocks Goitre, }; Cretins, 3.

Are we to suppose that these interesting results are the effects of chance, or of an accidantal association of circumstances confined to a particular spot? When we recollect, that a space of upwards of a thousand square miles has been made subject to the inquiry, and that in every portion of this space, the same invariable circumstances attended the presence of the disease, and that its absence was invariably distinguished by the absence of those circumstances, it is more philosophic to view them in the light of cause and effect.”pp. 310, 311.

2.- Historical Sketch of Amherst, in the County of Hillsbor

ough, in New Hampshire, from its first Settlement to the Year 1837. By John FARMER, Corresponding Secretary of the N. H. Historical Society. Second Edition, en

larged. Concord. 1837. 8vo. pp. 52. Mr. Farmer, the author of the above history, is well known as one of the most indefatigable and accurate antiquaries in the

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