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this influence has been increased immensely by posits, which opened a door to its tenfold activity of our present embarrassments, Mr. Adams does upon, whereas we cannot but think it deserves a pr

He dwells particularly upon the excessive is which, in his last pamphlet, he calls rags, a rhetor tion of paper not practically at the moment rede precious metals, which has run through the ni declamations, but which is not, we think, entitle a grave pamphlet; for, though the paper is not ex dollars in specie, on presentment at the bank, stil valid lien on the lands, houses, and goods of the debtors; a lien which will be available, though t] be a dollar in specie in the country. This is which does not belong to rags.

In connexion with this subject of excessive i Mr. Adams lays down one proposition fortified b of David Hume, who has been followed by sund which is made the foundation of a broad theory b, viz, that the value (in exchangeable commodities mass of currency will depend upon its proportio mass of property in the community, and accor value of a given quantity of currency, a specie dol. will be inversely in that proportion. This is prec propositions to build theories of and upon; but, as of very little weight in practical discussions. L doctrines in theoretical political economy, it is sp a remote, partial, qualified verity; that is, it is gree or two degrees, more or less, out of ten, so dertake to apply it practically, the chance is fiv that you may have got it in one of its false d other words, applied it to a wrong case. This the Adams to attribute too great an effect to expar lation beyond the wants of the community.” 1 been too much expanded, almost immeasurably t is no doubt ; and this everybody understands well understood by everybody. also, that the ba hand in hand with the community in expanding has brought on embarrassments, that cost ardu perate struggling for disentanglement. But as to of excess of either paper or metallic currency,

ij excessive facility and extension of credits, it is, us, an evil not weighty or difficult of remedy. therefore, that Mr. Adams underrates and does gi Mr. Webster's remark, that, before the explos

this influence has been increased immensely by the public de posits, which opened a door to its tenfold activity

. This cauze of our present embarrassments, Mr. Adams does not lay stress upon, , whereas we cannot but think it deserves a prominent place

. He dwells particularly upon the excessive issues of paper

, which, in his last pamphlet

, he calls rags, a rhetorical denomination of paper not practically at the moment redeemable in the precious metals, which has run through the newspapers declamations, but which is not, we think, entitled to a place in a grave pamphlet ; for, though the paper is not exchangeable for dollars in specie, on presentment at the bank, still it does give a valid lien on the lands, houses, and goods of the bank and its debtors; a lien which will be available

, though there should not be a dollar in specie in the country. This is a vital eficacy which does not belong to rags. In connexion with this subject of excessive issues of paper

, Mr. Adams lays down one proposition fortified by the authority of David Hume, who has been followed by sundry writers

, and which is made the foundation of a broad theory by Adam Smith

; viz. that the value (in exchangeable commodities

) of the whole mass of currency will depend upon its proportion to the whole mass of property in the community, and accordingly that the value of a given quantity of currency, a specie dollar for instance

, will be inversely in that proportion. This is precisely one of the propositions to build theories of and upon; but, as we apprehend, of very little weight in practical discussions. Like many other doctrines in theoretical political economy, it is specious

, and has a remote, partial, qualified verity; that is, it is true in one de gree or two degrees, more or less, out of ten, so that if you lidertake to apply it practically, the chance is five or ten to one, you may

it in one of its false degrees ; or, in other words, applied it to a wrong case. This theorem leads Nr. Adams to attribute too great an effect to “expanding the circulation beyond the wants of the community." That credit has been too much expanded, almost immeasurably too much, there is no doubt ; and this everybody understands ; and it is as well understood by everybody. also, that the banks have gone hand in hand with the community in expanding credit

. This has brought on embarrassments

, that cost arduous

, long, des perate struggling for disentanglement

. But as to the mere fact of excess of either paper or metallic currency, independently of excessive facility and extension of credits, it is

, as it appears us, an evil not weighty or difficult of remedy. It seems to us, therefore, that Mr. Adams underrates and does great injustice to Mr. Webster's remark, that, before the explosion

, and while

prices still maintained themselves, and demand great cause of embarrassment was the disturbance a This was at the time the main disorder of the syste become actually developed. The seeds of other di germinating, and must have shot forth, even tho changes had not been deranged. But what would the result had the previously existing complete sy changes been maintained throughout the storm, it conjecture. That the force of the shock would have we can hardly doubt. But we agree with Mr. Ac reverse must have happened, though the system had been maintained. His speculations upon the ating towards a collapse are able and just, as far as to the credit system. And in this excess, the ba have said, went hand in hand with the rest of the And to his remarks on this subject we will add, that bly went greater lengths with the rest of the commus ing this tide of credit, than a central institution done ; for through such an institution, all parts of being in quick communication, earlier notice of catastrophe would thus have been obtained. On t however, different opinions are entertained, and we into a subject that may lead us towards the vortex cussions.

The second pamphlet, on the remedy to be resort very strongly a return of the banks to specie paymen pressure it may cost. This we understand to be present policy of the banks.

As to the permanent guaranty against disorders rency,

Mr. Adams considers the most effectual one sumption of the regulation of the currency by government, by means of a national bank.

These pamphlets are well worthy of the attenti who take an interest in the vitally important subjec they treat.

have got

that

9.

The Lyrist; consisting of a Selection of I

Duetts, and Trios from Recent Works Authors. Compiled by Lowell MASON Webb, Professors in the Boston Academy Boston. Wilkins & Carter. 1838. 4to. pp

10

Music has been compared to a picture, or rather drawing, expressing by sounds, what the artist

shades and color. The graces are the finishin if not freely and naturally employed, are the the picture. So too has it been justly observed. 'performers, there is but one step from the subli lous. Where a great degree of excellence car correctness is to be aimed at; the correctnes other. But how often has one to endure the mo of half formed and vain performers, to give e mere notes placed before them. The great fa in the teacher, though it is still too often thi trusted to the training of those, of whom there have discovered that more money can be ma music than by beating the base drum or jingling the orchestra.

If the multiplication of musical publications to be taken as evidence of the increasing atte given to the divine art, then are we fast beco people. But we are not sure that it is not an contrary ; that it does not arise from the injudic which music is allowed to be generally taught, impatience for display and novelty. We are patience and perseverance, which can alone in music. The noble simplicity of the great masi despised and neglected for the fantastic, wild, a ties, that have nothing to recommend them but

True, indeed, the number of our performers i manufacture of Piano Fortes is carried to great us. There are probably few manufactories whi better instruments than those from the hands of C manufacturers of instruments and of performers pushed; while the instrument is building, the taught. Woe to the reputation and pocket of th pupil be not ready to astonish the friends ass judgment on both instrument and performer, former has received its last coat of varnish.

We cannot condemn teachers, composers, ( suiting their labors to the knowledge, taste, i their employers, and to the capacities of their as the first are compelled to resort to rapid, imf our most accomplished instructers will aim at more than mechanical dexterity of voice an parents can be made to understand, that music in execution alone, and that a Catalani or a Bee manufactured in

a quarter,” we fear we shall to boast of our progress in musical taste.

shades and color. The graces are the finishing touches, which, if not freely and naturally employed, are the greatest blots on the picture. So too has it been justly observed that, in the best 'performers, there is but one step from the sublime to the ridiculous. Where a great degree of excellence cannot be attained, correctness is to be aimed at; the correctness of time, if no other. But how often has one to endure the miserable attempts of half formed and vain performers, to give even correctly the mere notes placed before them. The great fault is not always in the teacher, though it is still too often that pupils are intrusted to the training of those, of whom there is no lack

, who have discovered that more money can be made by teaching music than by beating the base drum or jingling the triangle in the orchestra.

If the multiplication of musical publications in our vicinity is to be taken as evidence of the increasing attention which is given to the divine art, then are we fast becoming a musical people

. But we are not sure that it is not an evidence of the contrary; that it does not arise from the injudicious manner in which music is allowed to be generally taught, and the feverish impatience for display and novelty

. We are wanting in that patience

and
perseverance,

which can alone insure success in music. The noble simplicity of the great masters is to often despised and neglected for the fantastic

, wild, and frothy novelties, that have nothing to recommend them but their dificulties

. True, indeed, the number of our performers is large, and the manufacture of Piano Fortes is carried to great perfection with us. There are probably few manufactories which can produce better instruments than those from the hands of Chickering

. The manufacturers of instruments and of performers are alike hard pushed; while the instrument is building, the pupil must be taught. Woe to the reputation and pocket of the teacher, if the pupil be not ready to astonish the friends assembled to pass judgment on both instrument and performer, as soon as the former has received its last coat of varnish.

We cannot condemn teachers, composers, or compilers for suiting their labors to the knowledge, taste

, and judgment of their employers, and to the capacities of their pupils. As long as the first are compelled to resort to rapid, imperfect teaching, our most accomplished instructers will aim at imparting little more than mechanical dexterity of voice and finger. Until parents can be made to understand, that music does not consist in execution alone, and that a Catalani or a Beethoven cannot be manufactured in “ a quarter," we fear we shall have little cause to boast of our progress in musical taste.

number of these keys at a time, to apply by his owi has learned the ready application of all. The last, to the gradual process, in which the principles geometry are taught and applied, will be found hope, in the following pages." - Pp. 3, 4.

The execution of this book is admirable. Te the author for having used so clear and so simp pression, as to make oral explanations almost u arrange and select the praxis upon each section from it every word involving a principle not yet learner, and yet to present a series of neat sente then of elegant and interesting extracts from cl quired an amount of care and labor which can ciated by those who enjoy the benefit of them nating mind and good taste are visible througho

There are some faults in the mechanical book. For instance, the Latin words introdu sentences are not indicated by italics, nor in guished from their neighbours, the vernaculars this occasions less confusion and inconvenience ers, than we might at first suppose. A Latin or a person unacquainted with the language, English ones by its side, (though in the same ty tenance of a stranger is unlike the “old famili family; and though they may be " dressed all crape over their faces,” his eye has an instincti tinguishing the unknown from the familiar, ai much puzzled and embarrassed as we might fea

We cannot dismiss the work without mentio suitableness for fireside instruction; as parents long ceased to attend to the study of Latin, wil this volume, find a pleasant refreshment of their and be sure of laying, in the minds of their cl foundation for farther attainments.

7. — Annual Report of the Board of Truste

chusetts General Hospital for the Year James Loring. 1838. 8vo. pp. 30.

This Report presents a gratifying view of th usefulness of each department of the Hospita creditable, that gentlemen busily engaged, as Trustees, in the active concerns of life, should to devote their time and attention with so much

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