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POEMS. PART I.

589

Then Britain seiz'd the favourable hour,

To fix the basis of her future rest; To mark the limits of asserted pow'r,

The prince still blessing, and the people bless'd! Then safe from all the malice of its foes,

Time's iron hand, and war's repeated rage! Explain'd, confirm'd, her ancient charter rose,

And,clear* d fromdust, display'd its sacred page: The guardian star! whose future influence bright Might guide her happy sons, with ever friendly light'

Belgia, in fate's dark hour, the hero's care,

Britain defended, and Hibernia sav'd! Europe protected from the Gallic spear,

Shall stand on William's monument engrav'd! The studious eye, that runs his labours o'er,

Shall print his image on the grateful mind; Shall own, how mean the pride of lawless pow'r,

ComparM with his who fights to save mankind! And every Briton shall be just to own, Virtues like his deserv'd their abdicated throne.

Nor was to William's life his worth confin'd,

To her deliv'rer Britain still was dear;
That passion grew, when all the rest declin'd,

In death her welfare was his latest care:
T was then his calmly comprehensive thought,

Intent to future ages to secure
The blessings, his distinguish'd arm had wrought,

By one bequest establish'd freedom sure: And, in illustrious Brunswic's godlike race, Left us the settled hopes of long-enduring peace!

From the departing monarch's dying hand, Anna the delegated sword receiv'd;And Marlbro', mighty chief! at her command, High deeds perform'd, and matchless toils achiev'd!By land she triumph'd, triumph'd on the main,

Period to Britain's glory ever dear! Were not the honours of a ten years reign

Dash'd by the peace of one inglorious year; And veil'd in darkness set her ev'ning hour, As shooting stars that fall,—to rise again no more!

The Muse now meditates a nobler strain,

New plumes her wings, and fondly seeks to rise! Attentive views great Brunswic cross the main,

While Britain's joys exulting reach the skies; Soon as the monarch reach'd her happy shore,

Upwards to Heav'n her grateful eye she cast; Her fears, her doubts, her dangers now no more!

In present bliss dissolv'd each trouble pass'd: As men delighted view the solar ray Burst from the dark eclipse,—and kindle into day!

O could the Muse in equal lay recite

The scene attentive Europe once beheld, When from Vienna's towers, auspicious sight!

Fled the fierce Ottoman in arms repell'd: Then Brunswic's maiden sword, in conquest dy'd,

Gave signal proofs of his illustrious birth; Nassau well pleas'd the rising hero spy'd,

And by adoption own'd his kindred worth: And now his brow those regal honours grace, His virtues more than claim'd—familiar to his race!

Hence a glad era takes its fairer date, Whose rolling years in smiles of glory dress'd, Britain with pleasure sees revolv'd by fate, And treasure* up her hopes of lasting rest;

In George the founder of her brightest line,
Whose royal veins her ancient blood retain'd;

This happy period first was taught to shine,
And in its course increasing lustre gain'd!

Till the bless'd joys the godlike sire begun,

Establish'd stood fulfill'd, in his imperial son!

Great prince! whose early age in arms excell'd,

Valour confess'd by Britain's constant foe! When on fair Oudenarde's distinguish'd field.

Thy arm victorious dealt the deadly blow: To the high laurels which thy youth acquir'd,

Oh be the peaceful olive gently join'd! Let Britain's hand, by faithful duty fir'd,

Around thy head the grateful honours bind! Whose goodness drew from conquest and from war The nobler principle, to bless mankind and spare!

While mercy forms our monarch's dear delight, And gains new beauties from his royal smile;While truth and justice in his rule unite,

And freedom warms, and plenty gilds our isle:While Peace with guardian wings protects the throne,

And o'er the quiet land, and subject sea, Sheds the eternal sweets of safety down.

Warm as the Sun! and constant as the day! What heart so savage, not the joy to prove? What honest breast but glows with loyalty and love?

Thus while Britannia, of her wish possess'd,

Enamour'd gazes on her sov'reign's face; While in each potent charm of beauty dress'd,

She looks and moves with still improving grace: While from her ambient main, where'er she turns,

She sees her form reflected strongly bright; With grateful transport as her bosom burns,

Intent she presses to the royal sight: To thank him for the peace his presence brings, And welcome to her arms—the noblest, best of kings.

Oh let, great king! her pray'rs assume the pow'r,

With humble zeal, to reach thy gracious ear! Let thy Britannia mourn thy loss no more,

Nor for her prince's safety feel a fear:
Since by thy influence from her doubts reliev'd,

Europe to thee directs her grateful eyes!
Here let her vows, by ours increas'd, receiv'd

Before thy throne in glad memorial rise; And let conspiring gratulations bless [cess!

Tby peaceful labours, crown'd with ever just suc- Ambitious Gaul shall Nature now confine,

Her boundless pride shall vex the world no more; Defended by his old barrier the Rhine,

The German safe shall dare the hostile pow'r: Fair Lusitania, by Britannia freed,

Shall open all her hospitable shores; Her grateful prince shall pay his thanks decreed,

And pour his golden urn to swell her stores 1 Proud to confess the friendship of that reign, That calms the continent, and guards the distant main.

Transplanted now, the fair Austrasian line,

To Arno's banks along th' Etrurian plain, Shall feel the friendly warmth, nor more decline

Beneath encroaching Gallia's fatal chain; Her eldest hope, with regal honours grae'd.

Shall rise adopted to th' imperial throne; Shall reap the high reward of sufferings past,

And guard those rights for which ha lost bis own:

For which his ancestors of old have stood

So oft inarms renown'd,—and shed the noblestblood.

Meanwhile Britannia from her cliffs surveys

The distant world its various offerings bring; Receives th' accumulated wealth, and pays,

From thence, her willing homage to the king. In ev'ry port her anchor'd vessels ride,

Her canvass'd navies whiten all the main; Wealth to her bosom flows from ev'ry tide,

And golden plenty waves along her plain! What nation can such countless blessings boast, From Afrie's burning sands, to Zembla's icy coast?

Nor is she in her sovereign bless'd alone,

Though that alone might speak her glory great! While godlike Carolina shares the throne,

Her heav'nly goodness makes the bliss complete! When she revolves, with calm attentive mind,

The greatest queens her sacred purple wore; No princess on record her search can find,

Whose virtues more deserv'd imperial pow'r '. Whose conduct heightens all the pride of blood, Whose truly royal heart still flows in streams of good!

Angelic queen! whose unexampled worth,

Whose spotless piety, and sponsal love, Shine out a pattern to th' admiring Earth,

And saints regard with wonder from above! Whose royal wisdom, and maternal care,

So oft experiene'd, and so lately found! Has justly made thy name to Britain dear,

Has all her highest expectations crown'd: Still may thy brow that semblant circle boast/ Which for Heaven's holy truth, Bohemia's princess lost!

Illustrious pair! could virtue force impart,

O'er a degen'rate age to shed its pow'r! Yours would convey a beam to ev'ry heart,

And peace harmonious here below restore: Your Britons, while they saw such union bright,

Would feel of goodness the prevailing charms; Such as the royal meeting gave the sight,

When the king rested in his consort's arms: Oh! when did love, or sacred honour shine [line? In such bright forms confess'd, as George and Caro

Nor thou, dear prince, whom Britain fondly views,

Dress'd in benevolence! the softest light! Whosa gentle aspect, like descending dews,

Cheers a whole world !—the joy of every sight! Whether thy future beam the nations warms,

With heav'nly virtues fair meridian course; Or shines reflected from victorious arms,

With stronger lustre, and augmented force: Still may the faithful Muse select thy name To grace the fairest page, in all the rolls of fame!

Close by her much-lov'd Frederic's royal side

With native beauty and imperial air! Augusta shines our ornament and pride,

Who view enamour'd the distinguish'd pair;
While we revolve his princely humane mind,

His love of learning, liberty, and truth!
With her unblemish'd faith and candour join'd,

Her matchless sweetness, and unspotted youth! How does the happy contrast charm our eyes? From union so complete, whatfuture bliss shall rise?

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Already are Britannia's vows repaid,

So smiles the bounty of indulgent Heav'n;
Charm'd she beholds an infant princely-maid, A new Augusta to her arms is giv'n!As when the orient Sun restores the day, Fair Nature blooms to the delighted eye;So from this new-born star's propitious ray,

We feel young hope, and unabated joy!And in this happy gift prophetic find
A long heroic line, to bless and save mankind.

Nor does at home Britannia's glory shine,

Confin'd the mighty blessings to her breast: Her sea-born sister she invites to join, ■

And with her share of happiness be bless'd: Her eldest princess, fix'd on Belgia's shore,

A free-born people's duteous love shall claim; Destin'd a line of heroes to restore,

And spread new honour o'er the lasting name! For when her godlike sire her hand bestow'd, He amply paid the debt to Nassau Britain ow'd!

Young William's princely form she pleas'd survey!

With manly air and grace peculiar shine;If early worth insures a lasting praise,

Fame's noblest wreaths shall one great day be thine. As Pallas once in Mentor's shape confess'd, The Grecian prince the love of virtue taught:With fortitude and patience steel'd bis breast.

And by degrees the finish'd hero wrought:So, in thy cares, the picture, Poyntz, we see, And Britain safe confides her second hopes to thee!

Ravish'd she views Amelia's angel-truth,

Mildness divine! that ev'ry bosom warms! With Carolina's bright accomplish'd youth.

Where virtue lends to beauty stronger charms: Maria rises next in blooming pride,

A name belov'd! the owner's charms endears! And fair Louisa by her sister's side, In soft maternal majesty appears! Happy the prince such consorts shall obtain. Happier the favour'd land, where Heaven shall fix their reign!

Around their sov'reign, an illustrious band

With cheerful smile and glad attendance wait! And Britain pours the beauty of the land,

To swell the honour of her monarch's state: But oh! to speak each loyal patriot's fame,

To paint the charms of each distinguish'd fair, Might Pindar's fire with Sappho's softness claim,

The lofty note, and heart-dissolving air! One blaze of light the galaxy appears, 'Tis knowledge only tells, the trkole it made of start.

But here the Muse suspends her hardy flight,

Returning reason bids the rover pause! Dazzled with beams of unfrequented light,

Back to the earth receding now she draws: Yet if th' excursion pleasing seem to thee,

Walpole, whose studious thought the nation sees, From force and faction guard her safety free;

And in surrounding storms preserve her ease: At least, she has not aim'd to sing in vain, [gaia' Her labour so receiv'd, the noblest thanks shall

Now war, with all her ghastly train withdrawn,
From beauteous Europe's happy field is fled;And screen'd behind the marshy banks of Don,
Or Neyster's noisy falls, reclines her head:

POEMS. PART II.

591

O patriot-counsellor! the praise receive,
Return'd with every grateful Briton's voice;Thy country only greater thanks can give To George, to hitn, who made thy worth his With royal confidence thy virtues grae'd, [choice,

And on thy faithful breast his social honours plac'd.

What though dark Envy, studious to defame,

Which taints all objects with a jaundie'd sight, Wings close its pointless arrows at thy name,

Fur merit still envenoms Envy's spite: As when the cloud obscures the radiant Sun [way, Through the weak shroud he marks his golden So shall its destin'd course thy honour run,

And shed to future times its hlameless ray! For virtue with prevailing lustre glows, [pose! Too bright for all attempts, its passage would opWhile thus beneath our greater Caesar's sway Domestic jars, and foreign broils suppress'd Britain beholds to gentler toils give way, And cultivates the nobler arts of rest: While he, Augustus-like, with godlike hand,

Bids the refolding gates of Janus close! And makes the glory of his wide command, To give his people and the world repose: The Muse, that sees with joy the storm suhside. Hangs up her lyre to peace, with grateful honest . - , j

APOLLO AND DAPHNE.

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BAVWS.

Nihil est quod credere de se Non possit.

St nature madman, and by study fool,
Bavins turns doctor, and destroys by rule;With heavy face our dubious health presides,
Speaks without judgment, and by guess prescribes;Awkwardly gay, and stupidly alert!In every conversation tops his part:Talks much of travel, books, and state-affairs,
And takes a thousand fashionable airs!He rattles, plays quadrille, sometimes can drink,
Make love en hete—do any thing but think:Yet to convince this leaden lump can wound,
He weds a fortune of six thousand pound:And such the influence of Corinthian brass,
As wit unquestion'd all his blunders pass:For which a poorer or less noisy fool
Would stand the butt of public ridicule!
You'll ask why Bavius meets a different fate,
The 1

Cease, thoo hright god of poetry and light,
To urge relentless Daphne's rapid flight! [came,
Think on th' inconstant source from whence she
Well might she run, whose parent was a stream!

POETICAL LOVE.

As Daphne did from tuneful Phoebus fly,
Still must his sons expect an equal fate!

For cruel beauty doom'd in vain to sigh,
And find their tenderness repaid with hate.

PHCEBUS MISTAKEN.

When Apollo pursu'd his coy mistress of old, If his harp, as they tell us, was made of right gold;He should not have plagued her with verses and sighs, But set the fair gift in the reach of her eyes! Had she seen but the work, and been told what it

weigh'd, [stay'd;He need not have run,—for the nymph would have Comply'd with his flame, granted all his desire. And .urrender'd her charms in exchange for the

lyre.

SUSANNA AND LUCRETIA.

SriAs-N*. take Lucretia's hoasted place,
Superior virtue claims superior pow'r!

The Roman could not live with her disgrace(
But thou more nobly chose to die heforei!

Yet to reward her gen'rous high design,
Her hleeding hosom set her country free;

While Heav'n, in juster recompense to thine,
Restor'd hoth life and fame entire to thee!

HOMER.

He forwhosc hirth seven states could zealous strive,
Why did he wander round from door to door?

Rever' d when dead, neglected while alive,
With all his genius—still the bard was poor!

THE WISH. Hoc erat in votis.

The various ills below content I'll bear,

Grant me, indulgent Heav'n! this sole request;

Nor life to overprize, nor death to fear,
Let Fortune shuffle as she please the rest!

i Part of this thought is taken from two lines placed under the statue of Susanna, in the electoral hall of the palace at Munich in Bavaria.

Casta Susanna placet, Lucretia cede Susannae;

Tit post, ilia mori maluit ante scelus.

ON THE FOLLOWING MOTTO OF AN

EMINENT FRAUDULENT BANKRUPT,

AT EDINBURGH.

CAVE.DEU5.VIDET.

Good master C—— his majesty's engraver
Chose out a motto odd for his behaviour;
Well might he bake (he thought) as well as brew,
God sees (says the professor) all we do:
Who could suspect the end of such a song?
Was the man right, or was the motto wrong?
To tell the truth, and make the matter plain, C thought to turn religion into gain;But finding men began to doubt bis play,
The knave, like Jonas, fairly run away.

THE GOLDEN RULE.

Honest friend! say all you can,
In life still holds the golden rule: That riches make a fool a man,
And poverty a man—a fool!

JUSTICE, WHY BUND t

Says Will to Matt—" What cause can be assign'd,
Why sacred Themis still is pictured blind ?'*
"Because,"says Will," when tow'ring vice prevails,
She may excuse the errour of her scales j .
For most who know this present age agree,
Whate'er she thinks, she does not care to see!"

WRITTEN IN LORD DORSET'S POEMS.

He, whose accomplish'd hand this volume writ,
Possess'd in full perfection genuine wit;In which this property is always found,
'Tis doubly arm'd both to defend and wound.

STANZAS

OCCASIONED BY MB. POPE'S TKANSLATION OP HORACE,

BOOK IV. BOOK I. ADDRESSED TO THE HONOURABLE MR. MURRAY.

While Pope to friendship consecrates the lyre, The Loves to hear the notes assembled throng!And, with the softness of renew'd desire, Inspire the dear re-animated song! Unrival'd bard, the kindly task forbear!The youth before had worth too much to boast; You, Orpheus-like, but raise the syren air,

The British nymphs approach!—your friend is lost!Hard fate! a praise so wish'd as yours to shun, Or by the soft encomiums risk to be undone.

But oh I err—and Murray must forgive

A praise that brings such unexampled bliss; To love is sure the noblest way to live, [this:

Wealth, pride, and fame are faint comparM to Descend, dear youth, the shiuing guest await,

For beauty's queen the roseate bow'r prepare! Let her bright presence mark thy rising state,

And soften all the pomp of future care: And boast distinguish'd the delightful pow'r, To charm the wise and fair—when Pope must charm no more!

TO A YOUNG LADY,

WITH A TRANSLATION FROM VOITURE.

Such were the tender lines a Voiture writ,
That first-rate star of gallantry and wit!
To matchless Rambouillet he thus address'd
The grateful passion that inflam'd his breast;
Though cruel Fate has stop'd the poet's breath.
And all her beauties lie conceal'd in death!
To equal merit, equal praise is due,
He wrote to her what I translate for you!

A LADY ON A SINGLE PATCH.

— Urit grata protervitas
Et vultus nimium lubricus aspici.
Hor.
ODE.

Chi.oe, in vain with study'd arts,
You strive a charm to hide;

The sufferings of a thousand hearts
Those vain efforts deride.

No matter though one spot appear On such a perfect face >The Sun with many more is clear, Yet warms us ne'er the less!

INSCRIPTION

DESIGNED FOR THE PEDESTAL OF A WHITE MARBLE «TA-
TOE OF DIANA, TO BE FIXED AT THE ENTRY OF A W
L1TARY W1LDERHESS IN THE GARDENS AT EGLIKTOF
CASTLE.

Stranger! lest rash Actawn's fate you prove.
With caution enter this distinguish'd grove,
To meditation sacred—not to love!
Hence Venus and her boy are banish'd far.
Their sportive sparrows, and their shining car'.
But if thy heart in all its wishes be
Unsully'd,—as the marble form you see,
Approv'd of by the goddess freely pass,
And view the native beauties of the place!
Where, oft descending with her lovely maids,
Confess'd they wander through these happy shades;
Shine in the deep recesses of the wood,
Or trace the flow'ry margin of the flood I
With lively looks appear, and cheerful hearts
Secure from love, and all its poison'd darts.

POEMS. PART II.

593

wirrm In

MR. THOMSON'S ESSAYS ON LIBERTY.

Nihil est faxlius scrvituti, ad dec us et libertatem nati sumus—non potest parvo constare lihertas, banc si juste aestimas, omnia alia parvo aestimawla sunt. Cicero.

Wbew Liberty celestial goddess saw
Thomson's bold hand her matchless beauties draw;
Pleas'd, as the work intently she survey'd,
How bright the colours! and how strong the shade!
Fondly she cry'd—" In this immortal page,
My charms shall bloom untouch'd to latest age;
Though Britain should like Rome of old divide,
And sink the prey of luxury and pride!
Though every heart the love of me should lose,
Here shall they learn the blessings they refuse!
Though from this fav'rite isle, my last retreat!
Constrain'd I should be fnrc'd—and with regret:
Though servitude should overwhelm the ball,
Here I shall live !—and sigh to see the fall!"

TO SEMANTRE.

ODE.

Foacm, fair nymph, an unsuccessful lyre,
That would so bright a character essay;If tuneful numbers merit could inspire, Yours should be sung the most distinguish'd way.

Oft had I heard indeed the voice of fame
Repeat the wonders of Semanthe's yonth;

Till prepossess'd like Sheba's queen I came, And found, like her, that fame fell short of truth. But different widely was our fate in this,
With Solomon conversing long she stay'd;I only snatch'd an accidental bliss,

Nor could I know the treasure I survey'd. Yet as the smallest diamond's lustre shows The genuine splendour of its parent mine;So did her every charming thought disclose Her soul, and with reflected value shine. So soft the accents dwelt around her tongue, Such reason sparkled in her lively thought;Not sweeter notes divine Cecilia sung, Not juster sentiments a Prior wrote!Go en, accomplish']! fair! secure to charm, Vain is resistance, and as vain were flight;Submission only can our fate disarm,

Where sense and beauty, perfect thus, unite!

While intermingling virtues grace thy breast,
No wonder if so well they flourish there!

The soil so richly is by nature blest,
The climate is so like their native air.

So rich Sahara's aromatic land

Does without toil its spicy products yield; Odours profusely rise on every hand!

And native sweets embalm the happy field!

THE PARALLEL.

ODE.

Ai.inau with an angel-face Her form with pride surveys!And, as she moves with matchless grace,
The conquer'd world obeys!

Her eyes dispense resistless darts,

To set mankind on fire;
To youth she ecstasy imparts,

And to old age desire!

As the bright Sun, in Afric's clime,
His burning beams displays;Alike her torrid beauties shine
So fierce,—'t is fate to gaze!

Ocilia bless'd with milder charms
Takes gentler ways to please;Insensibly the heart she warms,
And gains by soft degrees!

So Cynthia HeavVs enliv'ning queen

Serenely sheds her ray! Glides o'er the skies with placid mien,

And half restores the day.

Such is Cecilia!—sweetly bright,

Still easy—still the same!
She guides us with a pleasing light,

And cheers without a flame!

Happy, so near ally'd is found

The safety to the woe! One sister's smiles relieve the wound,

The other's charms bestow.

CLARISSA, WITH A ROSE-BUD.

ODE.

Quam longa una dies, aetas est tarn longa rosarum.

Anon.

Clarissa, view this newly-nascent rose,

How sweet its fragrance! but how short the date!

And think distinct the lovely emblem shows
Thy equal beauty's bloom, its equal fate.

Like that in fair perfection's opening dawn,
Your roseate charms the ravish'd sense delight;

Pass but a few short years, and then withdrawn,
They all must fade, conceal'd in endless night!

Yet from the parent-plant's exhausted side,
See yon fair shoot its lively odours spread!

Rising in early beauty's native pride,
And softly blushing with maternal red!

Then haste, thou beauteous charmer! to employ
The treasures which indulgent Nature gave;

Nor longer shun to taste the genial joy,
Which youth alone can give—alone receive!

So when dark Fate, irrevocably cross,

Shall snatch you hence to grace the radiant skies; A self-born beauty may repair your loss,

A new Clarissa charm succeeding eyes!

The phenix so, amidst the spicy blaze

Consuming, does the fate of mortals shun;

The infant bird its radiant crest displays.
And men enjoy the rival of the Sun!

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